Science

5:10pm

Mon April 21, 2014
The Salt

UPDATE: Feds Say Powdered Liquor Not Actually Legal

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 10:30 am

Margarita in a moment's notice: A powdered version of the classic cocktail is in the works. But will the so-called Powderita tastes as good as one made with fresh lime juice?
Lee Coursey/Flickr

UPDATE at 10:29 a.m. Tuesday: The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau told CNN that its approval of Palchohol was an error. We've amended our headline and Monday's story accordingly.

We're growing accustomed to mixologist mavericks vaporizing, freezing and whipping our cocktails. So why not turn a margarita or cosmopolitan into a powder?

Read more

4:39pm

Mon April 21, 2014
Health

Robotic Exoskeleton Helps Get Vets Back On Their Feet

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 7:26 pm

Several bio-tech companies are developing exoskeletons that give people superhuman abilities. These robotic suits are also doing something simpler: They're helping people who are paralyzed, including many veterans, stand up and walk. As Erin Toner of WUWM reports, the technology helps improve patients' mental and physical health, but it's far from changing their lives entirely.

Read more

4:16pm

Mon April 21, 2014
Environment

Forced To Put Its Nets Away, One Fla. Town Clams Up — Literally

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 7:26 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Many commercial fishermen in Florida faced a tough decision 20 years ago: retire or find another way to make a living. That reality set in after voters passed a constitutional amendment intended to prevent overfishing. It banned the use of gill nets in state waters. Gill nets are large nets that are suspended vertically in the water. NPR's Greg Allen went to an island where former fishermen have found new careers since the ban.

Read more

12:27pm

Mon April 21, 2014
Around the Nation

No Longer Marching Out To Work, More Mothers Stay Home

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 3:24 pm

A growing number of American mothers are staying home to raise their children, according to a new report from the Pew Research Center. Listeners share their own stories about making that choice.

12:24pm

Mon April 21, 2014
The Two-Way

VIDEO: Leopard Attacks Residents In Central India

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 2:17 pm

Video of a leopard attacking residents in the town of Chandrapur, Maharashtra, in central India.
NDTV

You can see the video here. New Delhi Television calls it "an indication of increased conflicts between man and animal."

In the footage, a leopard is seen bursting through roof tiles of a one-story building in the central city of Chandrapur, Maharashtra, about 400 miles east of Mumbai.

NDTV says:

Read more

5:00pm

Sun April 20, 2014
Around the Nation

A Scientific Experiment: Field Trips Just For Teachers

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 6:43 pm

Science teachers huddle over bacteria colonies at Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry. The museum plans to train 1,000 area educators to be better science teachers in the next five years.
Linda Lutton WBEZ

In a classroom across from the coal mine exhibit at the Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry, students are huddled around tables, studying petri dishes of bacteria.

But these aren't school-age kids — these students are all teachers, responsible for imparting science to upper-elementary or middle-school students.

That's a job that many here — and many teachers in grammar schools around the country — feel unprepared for.

Read more

5:00pm

Sun April 20, 2014
Author Interviews

Far From 'Infinitesimal': A Mathematical Paradox's Role In History

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 6:43 pm

The 17th-century rivalry between English philosopher Thomas Hobbes, left, and English mathematician John Wallis lasted decades.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Here's a stumper: How many parts can you divide a line into?

It seems like a simple question. You can cut it in half. Then you can cut those lines in half, then cut those lines in half again. Just how many parts can you make? A hundred? A billion? Why not more?

You can keep on dividing forever, so every line has an infinite amount of parts. But how long are those parts? If they're anything greater than zero, then the line would seem to be infinitely long. And if they're zero, well, then no matter how many parts there are, the length of the line would still be zero.

Read more

12:25pm

Sat April 19, 2014
The Two-Way

Ancient Landscape Is Found Under 2 Miles Of Ice In Greenland

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 1:36 pm

A new study suggests the Greenland Ice Sheet did not fully melt during previous periods of global warming — and that it preserved a tundra beneath it.
Joshua Brown University of Vermont

In a surprising discovery, scientists have found evidence of a tundra landscape in Greenland that's millions of years old. The revelation goes against widely held ideas about how some glaciers work, and it suggests that at least parts of Greenland's ice sheet had survived periods of global warming intact.

Read more

11:03am

Sat April 19, 2014
Krulwich Wonders...

So This Is How They Do It! Zebras Getting Stripes

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 12:42 pm

Ricardo Solis

How did it happen? How'd the zebra get its stripes?

In Rudyard Kipling's version, a gray, horsey-looking beast went into "a great forest 'sclusively full of trees and bushes and stripy, speckly, patchy-batchy shadows," stayed there awhile, and after a "long time"... got stripy.

OK. Not bad.

Read more

4:37pm

Fri April 18, 2014
Shots - Health News

One Scientist's Quest To Vanquish Epileptic Seizures

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 7:13 pm

The dream of epilepsy research, says neurobiologist Ivan Soltesz, is to stop seizures by manipulating only some brain cells, not all.
Steve Zylius UC Irvine Communications

In the early 1990s, a young brain researcher named Ivan Soltesz heard a story that would shape his career.

His adviser told him about a school for children whose epileptic seizures were so severe and frequent that they had to wear helmets to prevent head injuries. The only exception to the helmet rule was for students who received an award.

"The big deal for them is that they can take the helmet off while they're walking across the stage," Soltesz says. "And that thing struck me as just wrong."

Read more

Pages