Science

4:17pm

Mon April 28, 2014
Around the Nation

Between Farmers And Frackers, Calif. Water Caught In Tussle

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 1:08 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Water supplies in California are tight with the state's severe drought and that's putting a spotlight on hydraulic fracturing or fracking. The controversial oil and gas extraction technique uses freshwater, which can mean millions of gallons for each fracking site.

Lauren Sommer of member station KQED reports from California's Central Valley, where tensions between oil and agriculture are on the rise.

(SOUNDBITE OF BEES)

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4:17pm

Mon April 28, 2014
Space

To Save A Satellite, Former NASA Guy Takes Crowdfunding To Space

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 6:18 pm

An artist's rendering depicts the satellite ISEE-3/ICE during its planned lunar fly-by in August 2014.
Mark Maxwell Courtesy ISEE-3 Reboot Project

Keith Cowing discusses his campaign to save an old 1970s NASA spacecraft from becoming space junk. ISEE-3/ICE is a satellite that was once used to monitor space weather, but it's been unused for decades. NASA doesn't want to spend the money to bring it back to life, but Cowing and his colleagues are determined to do it. If they can raise $125,000 on a crowdfunding site called RocketHub, Cowing says they'll contact ISEE-3/ICE, wake it up and put it back to good use.

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1:43pm

Mon April 28, 2014
The Salt

Got Gas? It Could Mean You've Got Healthy Gut Microbes

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 12:02 pm

Sulfur-rich foods, such as cabbage, bok choy and kale, can be popular with gut bacteria. And we all know how much the critters enjoy beans.
Meg Vogel/NPR

Not long ago, we heard about a catchy idea for a cookbook: "Fart-free food for everybody."

In theory, these recipes would be helpful for some people — and those in their vicinity.

But being a bit gassy may actually be a small price to pay for a lot of benefits to our health.

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9:56am

Mon April 28, 2014
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Rational Debate: We Can't Live (Together) Without It

iStockphoto

In a recent post at New APPS: Arts, Politics, Philosophy, Science, philosopher Helen De Cruz asks important questions about the role of evidence, arguments and debate in public discussions about evolution and creationism:

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3:34am

Mon April 28, 2014
The Salt

Fire-Setting Ranchers Have Burning Desire To Save Tallgrass Prairie

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 12:02 pm

A line of fire turns brown grass into black earth.
Dan Charles/NPR

For the past month, in part of eastern Kansas, the prairie has been burning, as it does almost every spring. On some days, you could look toward the horizon in any direction and see pillars of smoke. The plumes of pollution have traveled so far that they've violated limits for particulates or ozone in cities as far away as Lincoln, Neb.

But here's the twist: Environmentalists have come to celebrate those fires.

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5:21pm

Sun April 27, 2014
Science

Astronaut Twins To Separate For The Sake Of Space Travel

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 6:23 pm

Mark Kelly (left) will stay on Earth while his brother, Scott Kelly, spends a year on the International Space Station. NASA will test how the environments affect them differently.
NBC NewsWire NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

This month, NASA revealed new details of the plan to send humans to Mars by 2030. It's an elaborate and expensive mission, involving a giant deep-space rocket, and roping an asteroid into the moon's orbit to use as a stepping stone to Mars.

But there are still some serious questions about a manned expedition to Mars. Namely, is it safe? That's where astronauts Scott and Mark Kelly come in. The Kelly brothers are identical twins, and the only siblings ever to both fly in space.

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10:45am

Sun April 27, 2014
Science

Fossil Fans Get Their Dino-Fix Before Smithsonian Renovates

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 6:45 pm

A cast of a Tyrannosaurus rex skull greets visitors as they enter the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Huge lines of people, kids in tow, are waiting to get into the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, the world's second-most visited museum.

Right inside the lobby, a cast of the skull of the new Tyrannosaurus rex the museum just acquired is stopping visitors dead in their tracks.

"We wanted to get up here before the exhibit for the dinosaurs closed," says Crystal Epley, who took a three-hour trip from Broadway, Va., to bring her son, John.

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5:41am

Sun April 27, 2014
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Rare Observations Appear To Show Marmoset Grief In The Wild

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 7:02 am

Yasuyoshi Chiba AFP/Getty Images

In the Atlantic forest of Brazil, a female marmoset monkey — a small, arboreal primate — fell from a tree to the ground, striking her head. This female, known to observing scientists as F1B and as dominant to other females in her group, was severely injured and died two-and-a-half hours later.

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9:58am

Sat April 26, 2014
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Are Physicists Ready To Give Up The Chase For SUSY?

The Large Hadron Collider's ATLAS detector under construction in 2005. ATLAS is one of the tools physicists are using to try and understand how the universe works.
Maximilien Brice CERN

Is physics in crisis? An article in the May issue of Scientific American by physicists Joseph Lykken, from Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, and Maria Spiropulu, from the California Institute of Technology, lay bare an issue that is keeping a growing number of physicists up at night.

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5:51pm

Fri April 25, 2014
The Two-Way

For New York, The '10-Year Storm' Isn't What It Used To Be

Sandbags protect the front of the New York Stock Exchange on Oct. 29, 2012, in preparation for Hurricane Sandy.
Richard Drew AP

New York City is 20 times more likely to flood during a storm than it was in the mid-1800s, partly owing to sea-level rise linked to global climate change, according to a new study.

The maximum water height at New York Harbor during storms such as Hurricane Sandy has risen nearly 2.5 feet since 1844, says the study, which was published in a recent issue of Geophysical Research Letters.

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