Science

4:21pm

Fri May 2, 2014
Animals

How A Pan, A Lamp And A Little Bit Of Water Can Trap A Stink Bug

Originally published on Sat May 3, 2014 11:17 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The brown marmorated stink bug is a real pest. It can be found now in 41 states, the District of Columbia and also Canada. The bugs destroy crops and frustrate humans because they, too, like to shelter indoors when it's cold outside. Scientists at Virginia Tech say they have come up with a trap that can be made for just a couple of dollars.

From member station WVTF, Robbie Harris has the story.

ROBBIE HARRIS, BYLINE: No matter how good a housekeeper you are, it's not easy to keep stink bugs from ruining your image.

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1:21pm

Fri May 2, 2014
The Two-Way

Rock-Paper-Scissors Strategy Could Be More Than Mere Child's Play

Originally published on Fri May 2, 2014 4:22 pm

Contestants compete in a rock-paper-scissors tournament in Gainesville, Fla., in 2012. A new study indicates it's not as random as it seems.
Matt Stamey Gainesville Sun/Landov

The child's game rock-paper-scissors is designed for a random outcome in which no player has an advantage over any other.

While that might be true based solely on random probability, it ignores the way humans actually play the game, according to a new study published by Cornell University.

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10:37am

Fri May 2, 2014
Krulwich Wonders...

'Wassup, Sheep?' He Asked

Originally published on Fri May 2, 2014 2:39 pm

YouTube

4:54pm

Thu May 1, 2014
Health

'Provocative' Research Turns Skin Cells Into Sperm

Originally published on Fri May 2, 2014 8:46 am

New research could be promising for infertile men. Scientists were able to make immature sperm cells from skin cells. Their next challenge is to make that sperm viable.
iStockphoto

Scientists reported Thursday they had figured out a way to make primitive human sperm out of skin cells, an advance that could someday help infertile men have children.

"I probably get 200 emails a year from people who are infertile, and very often the heading on the emails is: Can you help me?" says Renee Reijo Pera of Montana State University, who led the research when she was at Stanford University.

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4:13pm

Thu May 1, 2014
Shots - Health News

Contagious Aphrodisiac? Virus Makes Crickets Have More Sex

Originally published on Fri May 2, 2014 8:47 am

Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Imagine if there were a virus that could get inside you and dial up your libido, so that you all of a sudden start mating more (more frequently and with more partners), so that the virus — the tricky, tricky, clever, little virus — could transmit itself through your lovemaking to somebody else, then somebody else, and somebody else after that.

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4:13pm

Thu May 1, 2014
Animals

For Red Deer, Iron Curtain Habits Die Hard

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 8:32 pm

Two decades after a Cold War-era fence came down, red deer in the Czech Republic remain reluctant to cross into Germany — a fact suggesting that some deer are capable of teaching certain behaviors. Pavel Sustr headed the research team on the red deer, and he explains more.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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10:46am

Thu May 1, 2014
Shots - Health News

New Virus Related To Smallpox Is Found In Republic Of Georgia

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 4:24 pm

Disease detective Neil Vora of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention looks for the new smallpox-like virus in Georgian cattle.
Darin Caroll CDC

Two herdsmen in the country of Georgia have been infected with a brand-new virus, scientists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday.

The newly identified virus is a second cousin to smallpox. And, like smallpox, it causes painful blisters on the hands and arms‎. Other symptoms include a fever, swollen lymph nodes and overall weakness, CDC scientists reported at a meeting in Atlanta.

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10:37am

Thu May 1, 2014
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Fighting To Save The Forest: Interview With A Yanomami Shaman

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 2:51 pm

Shaman Davi Kopenawa Yanomami is an advocate for his people and president of the Hutukara Yanomami Association.
Fiona Watson Survival International

Last week, Davi Kopenawa Yanomami, a shaman of the Yanomami peoples who is sometimes called "the Dalai Lama of the forest," visited the United States. Survival International, an organization that fights for tribal peoples' rights, sponsored his trip and invited me to interview him by Skype.

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9:13pm

Wed April 30, 2014
Shots - Health News

Experimental Technique Coaxes Muscles Destroyed By War To Regrow

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 9:35 am

A cross-section of skeletal muscle in this light micrograph shows the individual, parallel muscle fibers (red). These fibers work in concert to power movement.
Thomas Deerinck, NCMIR ScienceSource

Ron Strang was on patrol in Afghanistan when a primitive land mine exploded.

"When it went off, it came across the front of my body," Strang says. Though he survived the blast, his left leg was never the same. Shrapnel destroyed most of the muscle on his left thigh. He used to run, swim and hike. But even after he recovered, those days of carefree movement were gone.

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6:06pm

Wed April 30, 2014
It's All Politics

Nino's No-No: Justice Scalia Flubs Dissent In Pollution Case

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 7:28 pm

Whether the error in Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia's recent dissent was originally his fault or a clerk's doesn't make it less cringeworthy.
Alex Wong Getty Images

All of us who write for a living know what it's like to completely forget something you wrote 13 years ago.

But when a Supreme Court justice pointedly cites the facts in a decision he wrote, and gets them exactly wrong, it is more than embarrassing. It makes for headlines among the legal cognoscenti.

I'm not sure I rank as one of the cognoscenti, but here's my headline for Justice Antonin Scalia's booboo: "Nino's No-No."

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