Science

5:03pm

Mon March 23, 2015
The Salt

Even Neil DeGrasse Tyson Is Now Munching On Bugs

Neil deGrasse Tyson with a Cambodian cricket rumaki canape, wrapped in bacon. "I have come to surmise, in the culinary universe, that anytime someone feels compelled to wrap something in bacon, it probably doesn't taste very good," he said skeptically before taking a bite.
Carole Zimmer for NPR

More than 1,000 guests in gowns and tuxedos crowded into a two-story hall on Saturday night at the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

Standing among a pack of well-preserved African elephants, they sampled the delicacies offered by waiters wending their way through the throngs. They had come for the annual dinner of the Explorers Club — and the cocktail-hour fare certainly required an adventurous palate: All of it was made of insects.

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3:53pm

Mon March 23, 2015
Shots - Health News

Stats Split On Progress Against Cancer

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 8:33 am

Find other stories in the Living Cancer series at WNYC.org.
WNYC

When someone asks whether we're winning the war on cancer, the discussion often veers into the world of numbers. And, depending on which numbers you're looking at, the answer can either be yes or no.

Let's start with the no.

The number of cancer deaths in this country is on the rise. It climbed 4 percent between 2000 and 2011, the latest year in official statistics. More than 577,000 people died of cancer in 2011. That's almost a quarter of all deaths. Those aren't just personal tragedies – the figure represents a growing burden on America.

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12:56pm

Mon March 23, 2015
Goats and Soda

You Think Your City Is Full Of Trash? Ha!

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 6:51 pm

Even Oscar the Grouch might be put off by the growing heaps of trash in the center of Kathmandu.
Donatella Lorch

They don't call it Trashmandu for nothing.

In Nepal's capital city of Kathmandu, garbage is pretty much everywhere. It's stuffed in plastic bags and dropped in drainage ditches. It's piled high in empty lots, on the roadside and on the edges of the city's sewage-filled rivers.

It is thrown out of bus windows and off rooftops into neighbors' yards.

It's hard to believe Kathmandu could get any worse. But this month, it did.

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4:57am

Mon March 23, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Don't Be Myopic About Heritability

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 1:37 pm

Thomas Bradford iStockphoto

According to a news feature from the journal Nature, shortsightedness could be on the rise because children are spending less time outdoors than they used to.

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3:33am

Mon March 23, 2015
Shots - Health News

Rethinking Alcohol: Can Heavy Drinkers Learn To Cut Back?

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 8:34 am

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

The thinking about alcohol dependence used to be black and white. There was a belief that there were two kinds of drinkers: alcoholics and everyone else.

"But that dichotomy — yes or no, you have it or you don't — is inadequate," says Dr. John Mariani, who researches substance abuse at Columbia University. He says that the thinking has evolved, and that the field of psychiatry recognizes there's a spectrum.

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1:48pm

Sun March 22, 2015
The Two-Way

Top Beijing Scientist: China Faces 'Huge Impact' From Climate Change

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 7:06 pm

Smoke billows from chimneys of a steel plant on a hazy day in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, earlier this month.
Reuters/Landov

China's top weather scientist has made a rare official acknowledgement: climate change, he says, could have a "huge impact" on the country's crop yields and infrastructure.

Zheng Guogang, the head of China's meteorological administration, tells Xinhua news agency that China is already experiencing temperature increases that outpace those in other parts of the world.

As a result, China — the world's biggest emitter of greenhouse gases — faces a possible "ecological degradation," he says.

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12:54pm

Sun March 22, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Take A Shorter Shower — It's World Water Day

iStockphoto

Even though water scarcity is probably among the top of our list of 21st century worries, few people stress about it unless directly lacking a safe source of ample water.

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7:11am

Sat March 21, 2015
Your Health

How The First Bite Of Food Sets The Body's Clock

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 10:56 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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7:11am

Sat March 21, 2015
Science

Why Some Mushrooms Glow In The Dark

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 10:56 am

N. gardneri mushrooms grow at the base of young babassu palms in Brazil. A bland tan by day, the fungi emit an eerie green light by night.
Michele P. Verderane/IP-USP

A team of scientists recently created some fake, glowing mushrooms and scattered them in a Brazilian forest in hopes of solving an ancient mystery: Why do some fungi emit light?

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5:12pm

Fri March 20, 2015
Shots - Health News

Scientists Urge Temporary Moratorium On Human Genome Edits

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 7:58 pm

Microbiologist Jennifer Doudna at the University of California, Berkeley. She's co-inventor of the CRISPR-Cas9 technology — a tool that's recently made the snipping and splicing of genes much easier.
Cailey Cotner UC Berkeley

A new technology called CRISPR could allow scientists to alter the human genetic code for generations. That's causing some leading biologists and bioethicists to sound an alarm.

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