Science

5:28am

Fri January 16, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Making A Brain Map That We Can Use

iStockphoto

It is now conventional wisdom that the brain is the seat of the mind; it is alone through the brain's workings that we think and feel and know.

But what is a brain, anyway?

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3:23am

Fri January 16, 2015
Shots - Health News

By Making A Game Out Of Rejection, A Man Conquers Fear

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 7:56 am

Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Fear is one of the strongest and most basic of human emotions, and it's the focus of Fearless, the second episode of Invisibilia, NPR's new show on the invisible forces that shape human behavior.

This segment of the show explores how a man decided to conquer his fear of rejection by getting rejected every day — on purpose.

The evolution of Jason Comely, a freelance IT guy from Cambridge, Ontario, began one sad night several years ago.

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5:14pm

Thu January 15, 2015
NPR Ed

Do Fictional Geniuses Hold Back Real Women?

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 8:39 am

Geniuses in movies aren't always played by Benedict Cumberbatch, but they are almost always men.
Weinstein Co./Studiocanal/Kobal Collection

The "Lone Genius" character is hot right now in television and movies. Sometimes the genius is real (think Benedict Cumberbatch in The Imitation Game), and sometimes he's fictional (think Benedict Cumberbatch in Sherlock). But one thing is almost always certain: He's a guy.

Now one researcher says that gender stereotype in art may have a real impact on women in academia.

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2:51pm

Thu January 15, 2015
Science

Highflying Geese Save Energy By Swooping Like A Roller Coaster

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 7:59 am

Bar-headed geese after a molt, hobnobbing in Mongolia.
Charles Bishop Science

The bar-headed goose is famous for its long, annual migration from the Indian subcontinent to central Asia, a flight that takes it over snowcapped Himalaya Mountains so high and dangerous that human climbers struggle just to stay alive.

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5:58am

Thu January 15, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

What's Right About A 6-Year-Old Who Breast-Feeds

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 9:09 am

Mothers breast-feed their children of different ages during the Second Synchronized Breastfeeding Worldwide event near Manila, Philippines, in October 2008.
Pat Roque AP

When the British newspaper The Mirror reported in late December that a UK mother named Denise Sumpter was still breast-feeding her daughter Belle, who is 6 and a half years old, two experts were invited to weigh in on the practice.

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4:51pm

Wed January 14, 2015
Environment

New EPA Guidelines Limit Methane Release From Drilling

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 6:33 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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4:33pm

Wed January 14, 2015
Shots - Health News

From The Mouths Of Apes, Babble Hints At Origins of Human Speech

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 8:56 am

Tilda the orangutan, relaxing between gabfests at the Cologne Zoo.
Cologne Zoo

An orangutan named Tilda is providing scientists with fresh evidence that even early human ancestors had the ability to make speechlike vocalizations.

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1:21pm

Wed January 14, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Capturing Changes In The Way We Connect

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 4:13 pm

Courtesy of Jacob F. Lucas

After reading a recent post of mine focusing on whether we should be living our lives, or capturing them, photographer Jacob F. Lucas got in touch. He recently put together a book called Commute Culture that addresses this same topic through pictures.

I decided to find out what inspired him to delve into this subject matter. Here are some highlights from our discussion:

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4:30pm

Tue January 13, 2015
The Salt

GMO Potatoes Have Arrived. But Will Anyone Buy Them?

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 2:43 pm

After a turn in the tumbling machine, these conventional russet Burbank potatoes are starting to show signs of bruising. New GMO potatoes called Innate russet Burbanks have been bred not to bruise as easily as these.
Dan Charles NPR

On the face of it, the new potato varieties called "Innate" seem attractive. If you peel the brown skin off their white flesh, you won't find many unsightly black spots. And when you fry them, you'll probably get a much smaller dose of a potentially harmful chemical.

But here's the catch: Some of the biggest potato buyers in the country, such as Frito-Lay and McDonald's, seem afraid to touch these potatoes. Others don't even want to talk about them because they are genetically modified organisms, or GMOs.

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4:16pm

Tue January 13, 2015
Space

Stars Shine Bright In Ireland's Dark Sky Reserve

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 6:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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