Science

3:38pm

Wed July 25, 2012
The Picture Show

Changing The Image Of AIDS

Originally published on Sat February 2, 2013 10:03 am

David Binder

Photographer David Binder began documenting stories about AIDS in the late 1980s and became well known for humanizing the epidemic for various publications, including Life magazine and The Philadelphia Inquirer.

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2:17pm

Wed July 25, 2012
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Cosmic Rays: 100 Years Of Mystery

Originally published on Wed August 1, 2012 12:02 pm

An artist's impression of the quasar 3C 279, about five billion light years away. This quasar contains a black hole with a mass about one billion times that of the sun.
M. Kornmesser ESO

This August, physicists are celebrating the 100th anniversary of the discovery of cosmic rays, showers of particles raining down on us from outer space. Although much has been learned about the nature and composition of cosmic rays, many puzzling questions remain. No one knows what physical processes could possibly accelerate particles to energies millions of times higher than those reached at CERN's Large Hadron Collider, where the Higgs was recently discovered.

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11:51am

Wed July 25, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Epidemics Prefer Changing Planes In JFK Over ATL

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 12:34 pm

Travelers crowd around a ticketing counter at John F. Kennedy International Airport in April 2010 in New York.
Jason DeCrow AP

When the next epidemic comes, there's a good chance it will switch flights at John F. Kennedy Airport in New York.

Researchers at MIT have developed a pretty nifty computer model to figure out the most influential airports in the early stages of an epidemic's spread.

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10:26am

Wed July 25, 2012
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Hyperdrive? What Hyperdrive? We're Stuck Here

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 11:26 am

I just want to point out to regular readers of 13.7 that co-founder and regular contributor Adam Frank has a piece worth reading on the NYT op-ed page today. It's titled "Alone In The Void" and it really puts the human race in its place. Here's a taste:

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4:55am

Wed July 25, 2012
Joe's Big Idea

Summer Science: Clothes Keep You Cool, More Or Less

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 10:05 am

United States runner Kam Conley sheds layers to train for the Olympics in England on Monday. Less clothing means more evaporation, keeping athletes cooler.
Hussein Malla AP

The cool weather in London is good news for the Olympic athletes because their bodies won't need to put as much energy into cooling off.

But most of us aren't lucky enough to be headed to London, and we could use some help keeping cool.

When you get hot you sweat โ€” but it's not enough to just sweat. To cool off, you need that sweat to evaporate. It's evaporation that drains the heat from your body.

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4:46pm

Tue July 24, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Tie My Shoes, Please: How Persuasion Works

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 5:23 pm

Can You Help Me Tie My Shoe? Researchers found that when study participants were asked an unusual request, they were more likely later on to perform a favor.
iStockphoto.com

Marketers, managers and panhandlers all have something in common: They regularly want to make you do things they want. Marketers want you to buy stuff, managers want you to finish projects on time, and panhandlers want you to spare a buck, or three.

Over the years, psychologists have studied the techniques of manipulation and found several that seem to work. (Read on only if you agree to use these techniques for good and not for evil!)

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4:28pm

Tue July 24, 2012
Space

NASA Already Planning Meals For 2030 Mars Mission

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 8:51 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now, to a food menu that's out of this world. Specifically, it's meant for Mars. That's right. NASA is already cooking up a menu for astronauts on a planned mission to the red planet in the 2030s and, lucky for those aboard the spaceship, the cuisine will include more than just Tang and freeze-dried ice cream.

Maya Cooper is a senior research scientist at Lockheed Martin. She told us that NASA's current space food doesn't last long enough.

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12:10pm

Tue July 24, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

Which Is Bigger: A Human Brain Or The Universe?

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 1:46 pm

Robert Krulwich NPR

This is one of those fun-to-think-about questions. A brain isn't much to look at, after all. It's about the size of your two fists put together, three pounds to hold, but oh my, what it can do.

With our brains, we can think backwards, imagine forwards, conjure, create things that don't exist, leap vast distances. For example, suppose I say to you, close your eyes and imagine this:

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12:10pm

Tue July 24, 2012
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Why We Must Keep Reaching For The Stars

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 2:52 pm

Astronaut Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin รขย€ย” lunar module pilot for the Apollo 11 mission รขย€ย” walks on the moon in July 1969.
Neil A. Armstrong NASA

Field Log, Imperial Archeological Expedition IV-V, May 21, 2750 CE: Spent the better part of the day bringing artifacts up from the mud-caves. It's hard to believe what we are finding. It's impossible really. Lifan-Alfred says she has deciphered a good portion of the documents. They speak of rockets and journeys into space. There are even detailed accounts of trips to the moon, seven of them! Some of the technology described in the documents matches closely with the artifacts we are finding. These stories, they could be true.

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11:52am

Tue July 24, 2012
Remembrances

The Humility And Determination Of Sally Ride

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 10:47 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, as sports fans around the world look forward to the start of the Olympics, we'll check in with a star of the U.S. women's soccer team, Sydney Leroux. We'll have that conversation in just a few minutes.

But first, we are taking a closer look at the life and legacy of a pioneering American, Sally Ride, the first American woman in space. She died yesterday after a battle with pancreatic cancer. She was 61 years old.

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