Science

1:49pm

Fri August 3, 2012
Science

Making Movies That Zoom Into Foreign Worlds

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 2:29 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

You're listening to SCIENCE FRIDAY; I'm Ira Flatow. A little later in the program, we'll be talking about NASA's landing of its new probe, Curiosity, to the Martian surface. But with us now is Flora Lichtman with our Video Pick of the Week. Hi, Flora.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Ira.

FLATOW: This is a soothing...

(LAUGHTER)

FLATOW: I mean, I saw the video pick. It's so soothing, although it's on a topic that you wouldn't think is soothing at all.

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1:44pm

Fri August 3, 2012
Technology

Tech Giants Gear Up For Patent Battle

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 2:29 pm

A court battle between Apple and Samsung is underway in California, with each side arguing over intricate patent and trademark claims covering how the companies' phones and tablets work, look, and feel. Robin Feldman, professor at the UC Hastings College of the Law, explains some of the key issues in the court case and how it might affect the technology industry.

1:30pm

Fri August 3, 2012
Environment

Changing Views About A Changing Climate

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 2:29 pm

What is the role of humans in climate change? "Call me a converted skeptic," physicist Richard Muller wrote in an Op-Ed in the New York Times this week, describing his analysis of data from the Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature project. Though Muller was once a notable skeptic regarding studies connecting human activity to climate change, he has now concluded that "humans are almost entirely the cause" of global warming.

1:28pm

Fri August 3, 2012
NPR Story

Planning For 'Curiosity' On Mars

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 2:29 pm

If all goes according to plan, the Mars Science Laboratory rover, nicknamed 'Curiosity,' will touch down on the red planet this weekend following what NASA has called 'seven minutes of terror' during the descent. NPR science correspondent Joe Palca and John Grunsfeld, head of NASA's Science Directorate, give a preview of the mission and talk about what scientists hope to learn from the latest ambassador to Mars.

11:49am

Fri August 3, 2012
NPR Story

For Mars Rover, Curiosity Is The Limit

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 2:53 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Today, we begin our summer BRIC-tion series. That's where we're going to check out literature from countries that are rising on the global stage, the so-called BRICS nations: Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. We're going to start the series with Brazil, and that's in just a few minutes.

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4:56am

Fri August 3, 2012
Joe's Big Idea

Crazy Smart: When A Rocker Designs A Mars Lander

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 6:43 pm

NASA engineer Adam Steltzner led the team that designed a crazy new approach to landing on Mars.
Rachael Porter for NPR

It's called the seven minutes of terror. In just seven minutes, NASA's latest mission to Mars, a new six-wheeled rover called Curiosity, must go from 13,000 mph as it enters the Martian atmosphere to a dead stop on the surface.

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5:20pm

Thu August 2, 2012
Animals

Discovery Of 7,000th Amphibian Celebrated In Song

Originally published on Thu August 2, 2012 6:39 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now to a celebration. Well, it's actually more along the lines of...

(SOUNDBITE OF FROGS CREEKING)

CORNISH: Yes. Today, we, the warm-blooded, honor those who are not - namely, amphibians. That's because of the discovery of the 7,000th species of amphibian. A website called AmphibiaWeb at the University of California, Berkeley is keeping count.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "7,000 KINDS OF AMPHIBIANS")

CONNOR LOCKRIDGE: (Singing) From the slimiest frog to the tiniest toad...

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5:20pm

Thu August 2, 2012
The Salt

Extreme Makeover, Potato Edition

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 11:12 am

Jane Greenhalgh NPR

The sizzle seems to be gone from America's long-term relationship with the potato. Consumers are eating fewer of them, especially the kind that's not fried in a vat of hot oil. But what if a new and different potato arrived in town? A stylish one, with colorful flesh that was good for you, too?

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1:55pm

Thu August 2, 2012
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Killer Whale's Message To SeaWorld Captured On Video

Originally published on Thu August 2, 2012 4:18 pm

An image provided by SeaWorld San Diego shows Kasatka in December 2004 with a calf she had given birth to just days before.
Mike Aguilera/SeaWorld San Diego Getty Images

On July 24, video of a 5,000-pound killer whale nearly drowning her trainer came to public light via the FOIA (Freedom of Information Act). The 15-minute clip filmed at SeaWorld-San Diego in 2006 shows killer whale Kasatka dragging her trainer Ken Peters to the bottom of the show tank, then taking him back up to the surface, and back down for a lengthier period.

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10:35am

Thu August 2, 2012
The Salt

How Climate Change Is Changing The Oyster Business

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 11:30 am

Scientists blame higher levels of carbon dioxide in Pacific Ocean waters caused by global warming for the failure of oyster seeds to thrive in hatcheries.
Eric Risberg AP

Austin Docter has worked at a shellfish plant in Shelton, Wash., for 18 years and has a lot of words to describe what he calls the flavor profiles of oysters: Minerally. Metallic-y. Sweet. Buttery.

"Wherever oysters are grown, they take on the characteristics of the algae and water that they grow up in," Docter says. "It's a lot like French wine."

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