Science

12:11pm

Fri October 5, 2012
NPR Story

Starfish Blamed For Great Barrier Reef Coral Loss

Originally published on Fri October 5, 2012 1:03 pm

Over the past 27 years, Australia's Great Barrier Reef has lost half of its live coral cover, and a type of starfish is partly to blame for the alarming decline. Mark Eakin, head of NOAA's Coral Reef Watch program, discusses how to save the world's largest coral reef system.

12:11pm

Fri October 5, 2012
NPR Story

A Beetle That Puts The 'Extreme' in Extremity

Originally published on Fri October 5, 2012 1:03 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Flora Lichtman is here with our Video Pick of the Week. Hi, Flora.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Ira.

FLATOW: What you got for us this week?

LICHTMAN: This week's video pick is about a very menacing creature, and I want to give our listeners a chance to guess what it is based on some clues from University of Montana, biologist Doug Emlen and Erin McCullough.

ERIN MCCULLOUGH: These males have a giant pitchfork sticking out of their forehead.

Read more

10:29am

Fri October 5, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

Animals Who Love to Rub Themselves With Ants. Is This Addictive?

Originally published on Fri October 5, 2012 11:28 am

Adam Cole NPR

This is how we do it.

This is how they do it.

Read more

5:33am

Fri October 5, 2012
Research News

Scientists Use Stem Cells To Create Eggs In Mice

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Scientists have, for the first time, used stem cells to create eggs in mice. This long-sought breakthrough raises the possibility of some day doing the same thing to help treat infertility in people. As NPR's Rob Stein reports, that's generating a lot of debate.

Read more

2:28pm

Thu October 4, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Scientists Create Fertile Eggs From Mouse Stem Cells

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 8:45 pm

Each of these mouse pups was born from an egg scientists created using embryonic stem cells. It's possible the technology could change future treatment for human infertility.
Katsuhiko Hayashi

Scientists in Japan report they have created eggs from stem cells in a mammal for the first time. And the researchers went on to breed healthy offspring from the eggs they created.

While the experiments involved mice, the work is being met with excitement — and questions — about doing the same thing for humans someday.

Read more

1:25pm

Thu October 4, 2012
The Salt

The Cost Of Saving Lives With Local Peanuts In Haiti

Originally published on Fri October 5, 2012 4:05 pm

Alex E. Proimos flickr

How much extra would you pay for local food? It's a familiar question. We face it practically every time we shop for groceries, either at the store or at the farmers market. But what about food that can save the lives of severely malnourished children?

Read more

10:29am

Thu October 4, 2012
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Is There A Right Way To Be Gay?

Originally published on Fri October 5, 2012 9:11 am

Men holding hands.
iStockphoto.com

In an essay titled "How to be Gay" written for the review section of The Chronicle of Higher Education last month, David M. Halperin offered this provocative passage:

"Same-sex desire alone does not equal gayness. 'Gay' refers not just to something you are, but also to something you do. Which means that you don't have to be homosexual in order to do it. ... In short, it is a practice. And if gayness is a practice, it is something you can do well or badly."

Read more

11:10am

Wed October 3, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

Are Those Spidery Black Things On Mars Dangerous? (Maybe)

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 4:43 pm

Michael Benson NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/Kinetikon Pictures

You are 200 miles directly above the Martian surface — looking down. This image was taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on Jan. 27, 2010. (The color was added later.) What do we see? Well, sand, mostly. As you scroll down, there's a ridge crossing through the image, then a plain, then dunes, but keep looking. You will notice, when you get to the dunes, there are little black flecks dotting the ridges, mostly on the sunny side, like sunbathing spiders sitting in rows. Can you see them?

Read more

11:08am

Wed October 3, 2012
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Welcome To The Third Copernican Revolution

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 2:36 pm

Just the tiniest slice of what's out there: the Pencil Nebula is pictured in an image from the European Southern Observatory's La Silla facility in Chile. This peculiar cloud of glowing gas is part of a huge ring of wreckage left over after a supernova explosion that took place about 11,000 years ago.
ESO

When Einstein proposed the first cosmological model of the modern era in 1917, he had no reason to suppose that the Universe had a beginning. Everything indicated that the Universe was static and infinitely old, without an "origin" event. (A few redshift measurements made by Vesto Slipher in the United States were inconclusive and probably didn't make it to Europe, anyway.) Everything also indicated that the Milky Way was all there was out there. Other nebulae, seen with telescopes, were considered to be part of our galaxy.

Read more

3:33am

Wed October 3, 2012
Science

How Politicians Get Away With Dodging The Question

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 10:14 am

In a 2004 debate in St. Louis, President Bush answers a question as his opponent, Sen. John Kerry, listens. Both candidates used a number of "pivots" in their debates.
Ron Edmonds AP

Brett O'Donnell is a debate consultant who trains Republican candidates. He has worked with George W. Bush and John McCain, and for a short time earlier this year, he helped prep Mitt Romney.

O'Donnell is an expert on "the pivot."

Read more

Pages