Science

6:14pm

Mon October 29, 2012
All Tech Considered

Why Is This Supercomputer So Superfast?

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 4:46 pm

Cray employees put the finishing touches on Titan at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. The supercomputer may be the world's fastest. It's designed to do 20 petaflops — or 20,000 trillion calculations — each second. It consumes enough electricity to power a small city of 9,000 people.
Courtesy of Nvidia

The world's fastest supercomputers have come back to the U.S. In June, the title was claimed by a machine named Sequoia at Lawrence Livermore Labs. Monday, at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, what could be an even faster computer comes online. It's called Titan and it would not have been possible were it not for the massive market for video games.

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2:27pm

Mon October 29, 2012
The Salt

As U.S. States Look To Add Food Labels, Denmark Looks To Subtract Some

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 7:58 pm

Just some of the food labels a Danish government group is evaluating.
forbrug.dk

Wherever you look these days, it seems labels that strive to send a message about our food are on the table. In California, there's a vote coming up on whether genetically modified foods should be labeled. A few weeks ago, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission updated its guidelines for "green" labeling.

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1:51pm

Mon October 29, 2012
The Two-Way

Tracking Hurricane Sandy: Handy Maps And Apps

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 2:35 pm

NASA Earth Observatory

Hurricane Sandy is bearing down on the East Coast of the U.S., bringing sustained wind, heavy rain, and flooding that's forcing roads, bridges and mass transit systems to close from New York City to Washington. We're following the storm's progress and its impacts here on The Two-Way .

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12:42pm

Mon October 29, 2012
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Is It Silly To Seek Purpose In The Natural World?

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 11:45 am

Does it have a purpose? Does it need a purpose?
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Science and religion alike grapple with some of our deepest questions: What is the purpose of life? Why is the natural world just so? Why does the biological world strike us as so exquisitely designed?

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12:01pm

Mon October 29, 2012
The Two-Way

The Science Of Why Sandy Is Such A Dangerous Storm

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 11:33 am

A Dare County utility worker checks on conditions along a flooded Ride Lane in Kitty Hawk, N.C., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012.
Gerry Broome AP

Here are a few reasons government forecasters at the National Hurricane Center and emergency management officials are so concerned about Sandy:

1. Sandy is one of the largest hurricanes ever to strike the U.S. Sandy's winds cover an area of more than 1,000 miles in diameter. That's enormous by hurricane standards. So instead of affecting an area a couple of hundred miles across, Sandy will cut a huge swath. That means many millions of people are probably going to be exposed to high winds, heavy rains, and, for those on the coast, powerful storm surge.

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8:59am

Mon October 29, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

Celebrating Autumn All Year Round ... By Becoming A Leaf

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 11:04 am

Piotr Naskrecki

It is autumn, and where I live the leaves are peaking; there is a riot of them everywhere, narrow ones, broad ones, droopy ones, crunchy ones. Leaves come in so many shapes, hues, textures — the closer you look, the more differences you see. Botanists have names for every leaf type, and clumped together, says writer Robert Dunn, they sound like free verse poetry ...

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5:14am

Mon October 29, 2012
Science

Ocean City, Md., Jersey Shore In Sandy's Path

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

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5:14am

Mon October 29, 2012
Around the Nation

New York City Goes Quiet As Storm Nears

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 8:12 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

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5:14am

Mon October 29, 2012
Science

The Science Behind Hurricane Sandy

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 6:52 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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3:26pm

Sun October 28, 2012
Science

Millennia Of Stargazing At 'African Cosmos' Exhibit

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 6:33 pm

Untitled, by South African artist Gavin Jantjes, is one of the works in the "African Cosmos" exhibition.
National Museum of African Art

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