Science

2:48pm

Thu August 13, 2015
The Salt

You Don't Need To Go Low-Carb To Burn Body Fat, Study Says

Originally published on Fri August 14, 2015 2:43 pm

Low-carb diet or low-fat one? Either diet will trigger the body to burn off fat, a new study finds.
Mahafreen H. Mistry/NPR

If you've ever tried to lose weight, you've probably gotten drawn into the argument over whether it's better to cut carbs or fat from your diet. A new study doesn't completely resolve that question, but it does provide an important insight.

Some proponents of the low-carb diet insist that you must cut carbs to burn off body fat. Their reasoning goes that when you cut carbs, your body's insulin levels drop, and that's essential in order to burn fat.

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2:17pm

Thu August 13, 2015
Shots - Health News

Chatty Marmosets Have Something To Say About Vocal Learning

Originally published on Mon August 17, 2015 5:06 pm

Common marmosets can copy the sounds and intonations of their parents.
iStockphoto

Learning to make sounds by listening to others is a skill that helps make us human.

But research now suggests a species of monkey may have evolved similar abilities.

Marmosets have the capacity to learn calls from their parents, according to research published Thursday in the journal Science. The results mean that studying marmosets might provide insights into developmental disorders found in humans. It also suggests that vocal learning may be more widespread than many researchers thought.

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12:51pm

Thu August 13, 2015
All Tech Considered

Drones Increase Heart Rates Of Wild Bears. Too Much Stress?

Originally published on Fri August 14, 2015 12:52 pm

A brown bear in its natural habitat. Wildlife ecologists in Minnesota found that black bears in their study experienced an increase in heart rate when buzzed by drones.
iStockphoto

For wildlife biologists, unmanned aerial vehicles are like a dream come true.

Instead of struggling through rugged, difficult terrain to get to the animal they want to study, they can just send in a drone with a camera.

And as drones get cheaper and more available, everyone in biology seems to have new ideas for how to use them, says Mark Ditmer, a wildlife ecologist at the University of Minnesota, St. Paul.

But how do the animals feel about these little UFOs hovering overhead?

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5:24am

Thu August 13, 2015
Research News

Matchmakers Are Happier Than Non-Matchmakers, Research Shows

Originally published on Thu August 13, 2015 8:20 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

5:24am

Thu August 13, 2015
Science

Listening To Whale Migration Reveals A Sea Of Noise Pollution, Too

Originally published on Wed August 19, 2015 4:24 pm

Humpback whales and tanker in Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary in Massachusetts Bay.
Green Fire Productions/Flickr

Christopher Clark, who directs the bioacoustics research program at Cornell University, is among the world's best scientific listeners. His work has revealed how human-made noise is filling the ocean, making it harder for marine animals to hear their own world. But Clark didn't start out with much interest in whales at all.

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4:59am

Thu August 13, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Sharing Grief Across Species Lines

Originally published on Thu August 13, 2015 11:48 am

Barbara J. King says that caring for Bootsie has helped her deal with her grief over the death of her mother.
Courtesy of Barbara J. King

A few months ago, a 10-year-old gray-and-white cat called Bootsie was taken, together with his mother and brother, to an animal shelter in Virginia. The caretakers of the cats said they were just too old to care for animals anymore.

Bootsie's mother and brother were sent away to another animal shelter in the state. Bootsie, deemed "too shy" and thought to have a low chance of being adopted, ended up at the Animal Resource Foundation a few miles from my house, where the hope was that he might be socialized with some extra attention in a place quieter than the shelter.

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3:52am

Thu August 13, 2015
Shots - Health News

Sutures With A Soundtrack: Music Can Ease Pain, Anxiety Of Surgery

Originally published on Thu August 13, 2015 3:52 pm

We all get by better with a little help from our tunes.
iStockphoto

Hospitals have a free and powerful tool that they could use more often to help reduce the pain that surgery patients experience: music.

Scores of studies over the years have looked at the power of music to ease this kind of pain; an analysis published Wednesday in The Lancet that pulls all those findings together builds a strong case.

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6:04pm

Wed August 12, 2015
The Salt

Don't Worry, Honey, The Other Bees Have Your Back

Originally published on Fri August 14, 2015 11:09 am

Maryann Frazier, a researcher at Penn State's Center for Pollinator Research, checks on one of her experimental honeybee hives.
Courtesy of Lou Blouin

If you want to hang out with a bunch of bees, you'd better be prepared for a little pain.

Mario Padilla, a honeybee researcher at Penn State University, can usually tell when his hives are getting agitated. But he's already been stung three times today. And he's about to get it again.

"I got stung!" Padilla says, half-laughing. "And that was a sting that was not even an invited sting. That was an I-was-minding-my-own-business sting."

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5:38pm

Wed August 12, 2015
Science

Research Biologist Coins Term 'Kilo-Author' For Scientific Journal Articles

Originally published on Fri August 14, 2015 7:20 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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4:42pm

Wed August 12, 2015
Space

Perseid Meteor Shower To Reach Its Peak Tonight

Originally published on Thu August 13, 2015 5:38 am

NPR's Melissa Block talks with Kelly Beatty, senior contributing editor for Sky & Telescope, about the annual Perseid meteor shower, which reaches its peak Wednesday night. The event is a cascade of particles traveling at about 37 mph and appearing in the sky as purple streaks. They show up in August every year because Earth is in the path of the Comet Swift-Tuttle.

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