Science

1:53pm

Tue April 21, 2015
The Two-Way

Iowa Farm To Kill 5 Million Chickens In Effort To Contain Avian Flu

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 2:07 pm

A farm in Iowa is going to euthanize more than five million chickens in response to an outbreak of bird flu.
CHARLIE NEIBERGALL ASSOCIATED PRESS

A farm in Iowa is going to destroy more than five million of its chickens in an attempt to curb the spread of the highly infectious avian flu.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed the H5N2 avian influenza outbreak Monday, adding that the agency says that there is little chance that humans could become infected. According to the department's press release:

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6:04am

Tue April 21, 2015
Research News

3-D Printers Are Changing The Way People Think About Manufacturing

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 9:52 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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3:58am

Tue April 21, 2015
Religion

Construction Of Giant Telescope In Hawaii Draws Natives' Ire

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 3:27 pm

Native Hawaiians dance in honor of Mauna Kea at the base of Pu'u Huluhulu on the Big Island.
Molly Solomon NPR

In Hawaii, a battle is going on over the future of a mountaintop. Native Hawaiians say it's sacred ground, while astronomers say it's the best place in the world to build a massive, 18-story telescope.

This is not simply a story of religion versus science. Activists consider the construction of a giant telescope on the island of Hawaii to be a desecration of their sacred land.

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3:58am

Tue April 21, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

25 Years On: How Hubble's Vision Became Our Own

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 11:32 am

The Horsehead Nebula, as seen with infrared light, shows clouds surrounding it have already dissipated. The Horsehead formation has about 5 million years left before it, too, disintegrates.
NASA/ESA

When I was a young astrophysics grad student, I'd return home a couple of times a year. Eating dinner with some of my extended family, one of my great aunts would invariably ask why, at age 28, I was still in school.

I'd tell her about my work studying the evolution of stars — how they're born, how they die. But no matter how poetic or uplifting I tried to make my explanations, she'd always bring the conversation to an abrupt halt with the same question: "So what's it good for?"

Then they launched the Hubble Space Telescope.

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5:27pm

Mon April 20, 2015
The Salt

When Danish Cows See Fresh Spring Pasture, They Jump For Joy

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 2:21 pm

Near the Danish city of Ikast, some 1,500 spectators gathered on April 19 to celebrate what has become something of a national holiday at organic dairy farms around Denmark.
Courtesy of Organic Denmark

"They're running a little late," chides an elderly gentleman, tapping his watch at 12:02 p.m. He's come to this farm near the Danish city of Ikast, along with about 1,500 others, to celebrate what has become something of a national holiday in Denmark. It's the Sunday in mid-April when thousands of organic dairy cows at 75 farms across the country are released into the green fields of spring. At exactly noon. Eh hem.

Ah, but here they come!

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3:09pm

Mon April 20, 2015
Shots - Health News

Doctors Don't Always Ask About Pet-Related Health Risks

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 11:07 am

Reptiles like leopard geckos can bring Salmonella along with them.
iStockphoto

If you're being treated for cancer, an iguana might not be the pet for you.

Ditto if you're pregnant, elderly or have small children at home.

Pets can transmit dozens of diseases to humans, but doctors aren't always as good as they should be in asking about pets in the home and humans' health issues, a study finds.

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11:46am

Mon April 20, 2015
Shots - Health News

Humans' Use Of Pain-Relief Creams Proves Fatal To Felines

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 4:02 pm

Contact between cats and their owners may have exposed the animals to toxic levels of medication.
iStockphoto

Veterinarians have long warned that pain medications like ibuprofen are toxic to pets. And it now looks like merely using a pain relief cream can put cats at risk.

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10:01am

Mon April 20, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Considering 'The Philosophy Of The Web'

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 11:56 am

iStockphoto

We associate technology with the shiny and new. But humans have been using technology to change the environment and themselves since at least the lower Paleolithic period, when our ancestors were making stone tools.

Is the technology of today fundamentally different? In particular, does it change the way we think of ourselves or our relationships to each other and the environment? Does it change the way we think about what exists (metaphysics), about what and how we can know about it (epistemology), or about how we ought to live (ethics)?

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5:24am

Mon April 20, 2015
Research News

Why Handsome Men May Be At A Disadvantage When It Comes To Hiring

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 7:49 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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4:30am

Mon April 20, 2015
All Tech Considered

Social Media Can Help Track Tornadoes, But Was That Tweet Real?

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 7:49 am

Purdue University students are testing new software that may track and warn about tornadoes, such as this one which struck Rochelle, Ill., in early April.
Walker Ashley AP

Last week, as a big storm bore down on Rockford, Ill., students in a Purdue University classroom prepared to track its effects using Twitter.

Using software jointly developed by Purdue, the Department of Homeland Security and the National Weather Service, they huddled around laptops to analyze a tiny sample of the tweets from the storm's immediate vicinity. They were looking for keywords like "damage" or "tornado" and for pictures of funnel clouds.

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