Science

12:35pm

Tue May 19, 2015
The Two-Way

Plan Bee: White House Unveils Strategy To Protect Pollinators

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 3:50 pm

The federal government hopes to reverse America's declining honeybee and monarch butterfly populations.
Andy Duback AP

There is a buzz in the air in Washington, and it's about honeybees. Concerned about an alarming decline in honeybee colonies, the Obama administration has released a National Strategy to Promote the Health of Honey Bees and Other Pollinators.

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11:14am

Tue May 19, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

One Concept That Gives Physicists A Casper-Like Haunting

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 3:25 pm

Here at 13.7: Cosmos & Culture, we strive to bring you only the finest, most complete "big answers" to life's enduring "big questions."

And when there is more than one point of view to be explored, we lock our jaws onto the issue like a metaphysical pit bull and stay that way until someone calls animal control on us. It is that relentless commitment to the truth that brings us back today to the eternal question of why, exactly, your butt doesn't fall through your chair.

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3:24am

Tue May 19, 2015
Goats and Soda

They're Going Door To Door In The Amazon To See Why People Get Sick

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 10:14 am

Researchers meet participants: (from left) investigator Jose Luis Roca; Dr. Ernesto Ortiz; study participants Rainer Leon and his mother, Rina Leon Chanbilla; and nurse Jennifer Rampas.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Is it the mercury or the malaria?

Or maybe it's something else entirely that's making people sick in the Peruvian Amazon.

Those questions are bedeviling researchers from Duke University who have been studying gold mining in the region. Illegal mining has exploded in the area in the past decade, and the people living downriver have a variety of medical issues, from malaria to anemia to high blood pressure.

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6:07pm

Mon May 18, 2015
The Salt

Urban Farmers Say It's Time They Got Their Own Research Farms

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 1:56 pm

Mchezaji "Che" Axum stands in a hoop house at the University of the District of Columbia's Muirkirk Research Farm, a resource for urban farmers in the city.
Whitney Pipkin for NPR

About 80 percent of Americans now live in urban areas, and more and more of us are growing food in cities as well.

But where's an urban farmer to turn for a soil test or when pests infiltrate the fruit orchard?

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11:53am

Mon May 18, 2015
Shots - Health News

Does A Foreign Accent Mess Up Our Memory Of What's Said?

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 5:28 pm

Sometimes I look at my husband and think, "I really don't remember what you just said." Is that because of his charming European accent, or because hey, we're married?

Don't leap to blame the accent, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis say. They are trying to figure out how the brain deals with foreign accents, hearing loss and other speed bumps on the road to understanding.

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8:07am

Mon May 18, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Storing Information In Other People's Heads

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 5:18 pm

To function effectively in the world, you need to acquire a whole lot of information. You need to know exactly which medicine is appropriate for each ailment. You need to know how to fix your car and your router and your irrigation system. You need to know the date of every major holiday and how it is observed.

Right? Of course not. That would be crazy.

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4:58am

Mon May 18, 2015
Research News

How TV Show Finales Affect The Stock Market

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 9:00 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

So what happens now now that "Mad Men" is over? This is a real question that researchers have studied, and NPR's social science correspondent Shankar Vedantam is here to tell us about it. Hi, Shankar.

SHANKAR VEDANTAM, BYLINE: Hi, Steve.

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8:19am

Sun May 17, 2015
Humans

Learning To Live With A Void In Her Brain In 'Head Case'

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 10:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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6:06am

Sun May 17, 2015
Goats and Soda

Who Did This To Peru's Jungle?

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 3:52 pm

This aerial view shows the effects of gold mining on Peru's rain forest.
Courtesy of Gregory Asner, Carnegie Institution for Science

Gold has been a blessing and a curse for Peru for centuries. In the 16th century, one of the first Spanish explorers to arrive, Francisco Pizarro, was so enthralled by the mineral riches that he took the Inca king hostage.

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12:54pm

Sat May 16, 2015
The Two-Way

Unmanned Russian Rocket Burns Up Carrying Mexican Satellite

Originally published on Sat May 16, 2015 1:56 pm

A Proton-M rocket shown in 2013. The same type of rocket malfunctioned in mid-flight on Saturday and crashed over Siberia carrying a Mexican communications satellite.
PHOTO ITAR-TASS ITAR-TASS/Landov

A Russian Proton-M rocket carrying a Mexican telecommunications satellite experienced a malfunction minutes after liftoff from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan and subsequently burned up over eastern Siberia, the Russian space agency says.

According to Russian news agencies, the rocket crashed about eight minutes after launch in the sparsely populated Chita region of Siberia.

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