Science

5:23am

Wed August 22, 2012
Business

Chinese Factories Improve Conditions Where iPads Are Made

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 4:11 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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3:04am

Wed August 22, 2012
It's All Politics

Are Independents Just Partisans In Disguise?

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 7:31 am

Don Nichols iStockphoto.com

Independent voters have grown in recent years into a mega voting bloc. By some estimates they outnumber registered Republicans, and even registered Democrats.

Every election cycle, independents generate enormous amounts of interest as candidates, pollsters and the media probe their feelings. These voters are widely considered to hold the key to most elections.

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4:29pm

Tue August 21, 2012
Energy

BP Recalls Gasoline That May Cause Car Problems

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 7:36 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Time now for a story on the latest recall. It's not food or an appliance. It's gasoline. BP has recalled gasoline that was stored at a facility in northwest Indiana, near Chicago. But tens of thousands of gallons of that gas have already been sold and pumped into gas tanks.

As NPR's Jeff Brady reports, local mechanics are fielding lots of calls from concerned drivers.

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12:05pm

Tue August 21, 2012
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

The City As Engine: Energy, Entropy And The Triumph Of Disorder

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 7:36 pm

Adam Frank stands atop of the Wilder Building in Rochester, N.Y.
Carlet Cleare WXXI

Cities may be the defining element of human civilization.

The path from hunter-gatherers in the Paleolithic era 25,000 years ago to the high-tech, high-wonder jumble we inhabit today runs straight through cities. In traveling that path, our construction of cities has always been a dance with physics. In some cases, that physics was explicitly understood; in others, its manifestation was only recognized in hindsight.

As our cities have become more complex the physics embodying their behavior and organization has also become more nuanced, subtle and profound.

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4:02am

Tue August 21, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

High School Daze: The Perils Of Sacrificing Sleep For Late-Night Studying

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 9:01 am

It may not be the best strategy to stay up late and cram. A new study finds that when teens don't get the sleep they need, all kinds of things can go poorly.
iStockphoto.com

High school students with heavy academic course loads often find the demands of homework colliding with the need for adequate sleep.

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3:24am

Tue August 21, 2012
The Salt

How A Biofuel Dream Called Jatropha Came Crashing Down

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 10:37 am

A man harvests fruits of the Jatropha tree in Taabo, Ivory Coast. Jatropha, which is grown in many parts of the world, has fallen from favor as a diesel fuel substitute.
Kambou Sia AFP/Getty Images

From Congress to The Colbert Report, people are talking about the Midwestern drought and debating whether it makes sense to convert the country's shrinking corn supplies into ethanol to power our cars.

It's the latest installment of the long-running food vs. fuel battle.

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4:27pm

Mon August 20, 2012
Science

Examining The Truth About Rape And Pregnancy

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 6:02 pm

All Things Considered host Melissa Block talks with Nick Baumann of Mother Jones magazine about the belief at the core of Missouri state Rep. Todd Akin's furor-raising statement over the weekend: that "legitimate rape" rarely leads to pregnancy. The belief that hormones or adrenaline protect women from conception during rape has been perpetuated for decades in American political discourse, without scientific basis. Studies have found approximately 5 percent of rapes result in pregnancy.

4:25pm

Mon August 20, 2012
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

When We Mistake Our World

Applying Newtonian thinking is wrong when it comes to the evolution of life and culture.
Wikimedia Commons

We mistake our world.

With an arrogance born in part of science's triumphs since Newton, in part of the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, modernity, we mistake our living, human world.

More importantly, we mistake our humanity and how we might better come to live with one another as our globe, with its dozens of civilizations, rushes together.

Let's start with Newton. More than any other single mind, Newton taught us how to think. I've posted on this before, I know, but it warrants repetition. We remain Newton's children.

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4:20pm

Mon August 20, 2012
Environment

Wood Energy Not 'Green' Enough, Says Mass.

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 6:02 pm

Wind and solar get lots of attention, but another kind of renewable power actually creates more energy in our country --wood. The state of Massachusetts on Friday decided that these plants aren't green enough to get some special breaks.

8:48am

Mon August 20, 2012
The Salt

How Much Does A Hamburger Cost? That Depends

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 10:38 am

Crunching the numbers to show the environmental cost of a hamburger isn't easy, and we should know.
iStockphoto.com

A few decades ago, a hamburger was just a yummy sandwich.

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