Science

7:42am

Sat December 29, 2012
Shots - Health News

As Biodiversity Declines, Tropical Diseases Thrive

Originally published on Mon December 31, 2012 9:24 am

Mosquitoes like this one can carry the virus that causes dengue fever, which may become a bigger problem in some regions as biodiversity is lost.
James Gathany CDC Public Health Image Library

Global health advocates often argue that the tropical diseases that plague many countries, such as malaria and dengue, can be conquered simply with more money for health care – namely medicines and vaccines.

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3:32pm

Fri December 28, 2012
The Picture Show

This Milk Production Was Brought To You By A Robot

Photographer Freya Najade journeys into the weird sci-fi world of Europe's agricultural production. In one cow-milking facility she visited, "two people are needed to milk twice a day 300 cows," she writes.
Freya Najade

We all have an inkling of how our food is grown these days, but increasingly we don't really know what it looks like. You'd probably recognize a tomato plant or a cornfield — but these photos offer a perspective that a lot of us haven't seen.

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12:00pm

Fri December 28, 2012
NPR Story

Making Resolutions That Stick

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 1:03 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

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12:00pm

Fri December 28, 2012
NPR Story

Get The Most Bang From Your Bubbly

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 1:03 pm

In time for New Year's Eve, Science Friday examines the chemical reactions that transpire in fluted glassware. Ira Flatow and Richard Zare, a chemist at Stanford University, pore over the science of bubbles — from how to keep that open champagne fizzy (forget the cork) to why beer tastes better from a glass rather than a bottle.

12:00pm

Fri December 28, 2012
NPR Story

Book Challenges Kids With Science-Based Mysteries

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 1:03 pm

Move over, CSI and NCIS, there's a new game in town. Authors Eric and Natalie Yoder share some of their 'One Minute Mysteries' that can be solved with logic and knowledge of science — and without the aid of a magically fast DNA lab or improbable photo enhancement software.

12:00pm

Fri December 28, 2012
NPR Story

Chef Jack Bishop on 'The Science of Good Cooking'

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 1:03 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY; I'm Ira Flatow. Chefs are like, a little bit like golfers: They're always looking for tips to improve their game. So as you prepare for the last big party of 2012 or the first one of 2013, we have some gastronomical tips to improve your cooking and baking skills and the reasons behind why they actually work.

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12:00pm

Fri December 28, 2012
NPR Story

The Renaissance Man Who Got It All Wrong

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 1:03 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY; I'm Ira Flatow. You've heard of Leonardo, Michelangelo, Galileo, Newton, maybe even Pascal and Hooke, all Renaissance men who, between them, innovated in painting, sculpture, physics, math, chemistry, astronomy, architecture, philosophy, the list goes on. But how about Athanasius Kircher? Yeah, have you heard of him? Not ringing - no bells are ringing?

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12:00pm

Fri December 28, 2012
NPR Story

'Consider the Fork' Chronicles Evolution of Eating

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 1:03 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

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9:56am

Fri December 28, 2012
The Salt

An Evolutionary Whodunit: How Did Humans Develop Lactose Tolerance?

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 12:41 pm

Thousands of years ago, a mutation in the human genome allowed many adults to digest lactose and drink milk.
iStockphoto.com

Got milk? Ancient European farmers who made cheese thousands of years ago certainly had it. But at that time, they lacked a genetic mutation that would have allowed them to digest raw milk's dominant sugar, lactose, after childhood.

Today, however, 35 percent of the global population — mostly people with European ancestry — can digest lactose in adulthood without a hitch.

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4:20pm

Thu December 27, 2012
Research News

Birds Hang Around Mistletoe For More Than A Kiss

Originally published on Thu December 27, 2012 9:40 pm

Researchers in Australia found that when they removed mistletoe from large sections of forests, vast numbers of birds left.
BSIP UIG via Getty Images

For the Druids, mistletoe was sacred. For us, it's a cute ornament and maybe an excuse to steal a kiss. And of course it's a Christmas tradition.

But for a forest, mistletoe might be much more important. It's a parasite, shows up on tree branches and looks like an out-of-place evergreen bush hanging in the air.

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