Science

1:41pm

Fri January 11, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

David Bowie, Cheesecake, Sex And The Meaning Of Music

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 4:19 pm

Cheesecake: just a well-optimized fat and sugar delivery system?
iStockphoto.com

David Bowie released a new single this week. The song may be new, but it sounds old. It sounds familiar. Like a David Bowie song. It sounds new and familiar at the same time. This is what makes it so good, I think. (It also has the wonderful lyric: "The moment we know we know we know.")

This got me thinking about the fact that music has a history. This is puzzling. Why should music have a history?

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1:03pm

Fri January 11, 2013
Medical Treatments

Using Genetics to Target Cancer's Achilles' Heel

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 11:25 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Next up, yet another way that genetics is giving rise to new ways to treat cancer. A few months ago I was at a conference focusing on individualized medicine; that's treating people individually, using medicines that were designed for each person's genetic makeup. It's a new frontier that we'll be talking about more.

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1:03pm

Fri January 11, 2013
Fitness & Nutrition

The Fallacies Of Fat

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 10:29 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. This isn't going to take you by surprise, but America is fat. One in three adults is obese. For kids, it's one in six. But don't forget the infants. Doctors say there's now an obesity epidemic among six-month-old babies. And if you think you're safe because you're thin, consider that up to 40 percent of thin people have metabolic syndrome, in other words, on the road to type 2 diabetes, even if they can't tell by looking in the mirror.

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1:03pm

Fri January 11, 2013
Health

Pap Test May Detect More Than Just Cervical Cancer

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY, I'm Ira Flatow. Pap tests are routinely used to screen women for signs of cervical cancer, but now researchers from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore say the tests might be able to detect ovarian and uterine cancers as well.

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1:03pm

Fri January 11, 2013
Brain Candy

Getting A Handle On Why Fingers Wrinkle

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Up next, Flora Lichtman is here with our Video Pick of the Week. Hi, Flora.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Ira.

FLATOW: Now, we've got some digital research on this one. The other - the classic definition of digits, which...

LICHTMAN: The analog digital, your fingers.

FLATOW: Your fingers. That's what it means in Latin or something, right?

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1:03pm

Fri January 11, 2013
Environment

How E-Waste Is Becoming a Big, Global Problem

According to the EPA, more than 2.5 million tons of electronic waste, or e-waste, is produced each year in the U.S. Derek Markham, a contributing writer for Treehugger.com, discusses the global impacts, and why you should think twice before discarding your old cell phone.

1:03pm

Fri January 11, 2013
Space

Simulating The Red Planet, On The Pale Blue Dot

What's it like to live--and cook--on Mars? To find out, researchers are simulating Mars missions in Russia, and on the slopes of a Hawaiian volcano. Kim Binsted talks about her study to whip up tastier space food. Porcini mushroom risotto, anyone? And sleep expert Charles Czeisler talks about how humans adapt to the 24.65-hour Martian day.

10:05am

Fri January 11, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

The Oldest Rock In The World Tells Us A Story

Originally published on Fri January 11, 2013 1:51 pm

Steve Munsinger Photo Researchers Inc.

It's hard to imagine how this teeny little rock — it's not even a whole rock, it's just a grain, a miniscule droplet of mineral barely the thickness of a human hair — could rewrite the history of our planet. But that's what seems to be happening.

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3:55am

Fri January 11, 2013
Opinion

The True Weight Of Water

Originally published on Fri January 11, 2013 8:35 am

Craig Childs walks in the desert surrounding the Colorado River delta.
Courtesy of Craig Childs

Part of the nation's physical landscape is changing. Nature writer and commentator Craig Childs has been watching the dramatic transformation of a mighty river that is running dry.

Small porpoises once swam in the brackish estuaries of the Colorado River delta. Jaguars stalked the river channels and marshes. It's not like that any more, though. The Colorado River no longer reaches the sea in Northern Mexico. It hasn't since 1983.

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3:34am

Fri January 11, 2013
The Salt

This Butter Sculpture Could Power A Farm For 3 Days

Originally published on Fri January 11, 2013 9:49 pm

A 1,000-pound butter sculpture is unveiled at the 97th Pennsylvania Farm Show in Harrisburg last week.
Bradley C. Bower AP

For more than a week, it was the belle of the ball, the butter with no better: a giant 1,000-pound dairy sculpture that occupied the place of honor at the annual Farm Show in Harrisburg, Pa.

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