Science

4:41pm

Mon October 8, 2012
Science

Cloning and Stem Cell Discoveries Earn Nobel in Medicine

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 5:38 pm

The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was announced Monday in Sweden to two scientists: John Gurdon of England and Shinya Yamanaka of Japan. The two will share the prize for their landmark work on stem cells. These cells hold great promise for treating human disease but they are also a source of controversy.

9:12am

Mon October 8, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Nobel Winners Unlocked Cells' Unlimited Potential

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 3:28 pm

Shinya Yamanaka from Kyoto University was named the winner of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for discovering how mature, adult cells can be reprogrammed into immature stem cells.
Shizuo Kambayashi Associated Press

The two scientists who won this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine discovered that cells in our body have the remarkable ability to reinvent themselves. They found that every cell in the human body, from our skin and bones to our heart and brain, can be coaxed into forming any other cell.

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8:38am

Mon October 8, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

Eat Your Heart Out, Columbus: A Sailing Ship That Travels On Sunshine

Originally published on Wed October 10, 2012 11:29 am

Emmanuel Leutze Wikimedia Commons

4:25am

Mon October 8, 2012
Environment

Scientists Watch Antarctica, Arctic Sea-Ice Levels

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 4:35 am

The ice covering the Arctic Ocean was at a record low, in keeping with a sharp warming trend in the far north. At the same time, the amount of the ocean around Antarctica covered by sea ice hit a record high. It's winter in Antarctica when it's summer in the Arctic. But why in a warming world is wintertime ice growing?

4:23am

Mon October 8, 2012
Science

Nobel Prize Season Kicks Off Monday

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 6:50 am

British researcher John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka of Japan have won this year's Nobel Prize in medicine or physiology. They won "for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent."

6:26pm

Sun October 7, 2012
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

An October Anniversary For Our Universe- And A 9000-Year-Old Earth

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 8:50 am

A big anniversary is coming in a little over two weeks, marking the creation of the world — at least as according to James Ussher.

Ussher, a 17th-century Irish bishop and scholar, used the Bible to pinpoint the first day of the world's creation as October 23, 4004 BC. His method is explained here.

If Ussher were alive today, then, he'd be readying to celebrate the world's 6016th birthday.

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4:42pm

Sun October 7, 2012
Science

New Dinosaur Was A Small, Fanged Vegetarian

Originally published on Sun October 7, 2012 11:10 pm

Pegomastax africanus stood less than two feet tall and sported sharp fangs and a beak.
Todd Marshall

A small, fanged dinosaur called Pegomastax africanus was identified this week, more than half a century after its skeleton was dug up in South Africa. The dinosaur looked like a fierce cross between a chicken and a porcupine, and had long fangs which it used to eat plants and compete for mates. Pegomastax was a diminutive beast, standing less than two feet tall and weighing no more than a small house cat.

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6:10am

Sun October 7, 2012
Environment

Restore California Delta! To What, Exactly?

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 1:24 pm

Wetlands are returning naturally at Liberty Island in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in California. The state plans to restore more than 100,000 acres of habitat in the area.
Lauren Sommer for NPR

In California, state officials are planning a multibillion-dollar environmental restoration of the inland delta near San Francisco Bay. There's only one problem: No one knows what the landscape used to look like. Ninety-seven percent of the original wetlands are gone, so the state is turning to historians for help.

This detective story begins on a sunny day in a dry field of corn, about an hour east of San Francisco.

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3:02pm

Fri October 5, 2012
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

A Curious Question Of Vanity, Urgency, Pleasure And Anxiety

Sean Gallup Getty Images

Here's a question, dear reader. I'd like to know what you think.

Should kids have cell phones? Just to be exact, should sixth-graders have cell phones?

Let me see if I can formulate the issue a bit better:

Should I get my son a cell phone?

He's modest in his demands. He says he'll settle for an iPhone 4. It's not like he wants the latest model.

I am serious. What should I do?

I didn't need one when I was his age. They didn't exist then.

Has the world reorganized itself so that a kid his age really does need a phone?

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2:16pm

Fri October 5, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

In-Depth Genome Analysis Moves Toward The Hospital Bed

Originally published on Fri October 5, 2012 5:47 pm

Rapid whole genome sequencing could provide timely treatment options for infants in intensive care.
iStockphoto

Whole genome sequencing has become an essential tool for researchers. But slow speeds and high costs have helped keep the technology from becoming a routine diagnostic test for doctors.

But that's starting to change. And results from two studies published this week suggest that in-depth personalized genome sequencing could be inching closer to clinical reality.

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