Science

5:06pm

Thu February 7, 2013
Science

Blocking Iran With A Global Game Of Nuclear 'Keep Away'

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 7:27 pm

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (center) visits a uranium enrichment facility in Natanz, Iran, in 2008. Enriching uranium requires many fast-spinning centrifuges, arranged in what's called a cascade.
Iranian President's Office AP

Iran's government on Thursday made clear it has no interest in direct talks until the U.S. eases sanctions that have been squeezing Iran's economy. But the Obama administration isn't budging and says the ball is in the Iranians' court.

The suspicion that Iran wants to make a nuclear weapon is the rationale for the sanctions as well as for veiled threats of U.S. or Israeli military action if those sanctions fail.

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5:01pm

Thu February 7, 2013
The Salt

Animal Magnetism: How Salmon Find Their Way Back Home

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 2:50 pm

Bright red sockeye salmon swim up the Fraser River to the stream where they were hatched.
Current Biology, Putman et al.

Before they end up filleted and sautéed on your dinner plate, salmon lead some pretty extraordinary, globe-trotting lives.

After hatching in a freshwater stream, young salmon make a break for the ocean, where they hang out for years, covering thousands of miles before deciding its time to settle down and lay eggs in their natal stream.

So how do these fish find their way back to their home river?

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4:19pm

Thu February 7, 2013
Science

Fresh Clues In Dinosaur Whodunit Point To Asteroid

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 7:53 pm

Scientists have confirmed that the impact of a giant asteroid and the mass extinction of the dinosaurs happened at the same time.
Courtesy of Don Dixon/cosmographica.com

Some 66 million years ago, about 75 percent of species on Earth disappeared. It wasn't just dinosaurs but most large mammals, fish, birds and plankton. Scientists have known this for a long time just from looking at the fossil record. If you dig deep enough, you find lots of dinosaur bones. And then a few layers up, they're gone.

But scientists couldn't figure out exactly what had caused this phenomenon. Of course, there were lots of theories.

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12:25pm

Thu February 7, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

Next Time Your Mom Says Don't Go Out in The Rain, Spray Yourself With This

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 12:38 pm

YouTube

12:14pm

Thu February 7, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

When We Hunt, Do We Murder?

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 3:24 pm

iStockphoto.com

When people hunt and kill animals for sport, are they committing murder?

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3:31am

Thu February 7, 2013
Shots - Health News

Silica Rule Changes Delayed While Workers Face Health Risks

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 3:07 pm

A worker makes a cut in the side of a sandstone block at the Cleveland Quarries facility in Vermilion, Ohio, earlier this month. The legal limit on the amount of silica that workers can inhale was set decades ago.
Ty Wright Bloomberg via Getty Images

One of the oldest known workplace dangers is breathing in tiny bits of silica, which is basically sand. Even the ancient Greeks knew that stone cutters got sick from breathing in dust. And today, nearly 2 million American workers are exposed to silica dust in jobs ranging from construction to manufacturing.

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4:36pm

Wed February 6, 2013
Shots - Health News

Debate Rages On Even As Research Ban On Gun Violence Ends

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 6:12 pm

More than 400 guns, including these three, were turned in during a Dallas gun buyback program in January. But determining the effectiveness of such programs is difficult due to limits on gun-related research.
Tom Pennington Getty Images

The characteristics of gun violence in the U.S. are largely unknown because key federal health agencies have been banned from conducting such research since the mid-1990s.

President Obama, however, wants to change that.

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1:06pm

Wed February 6, 2013
The Salt

Stone Age Stew? Soup Making May Be Older Than We'd Thought

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 4:36 pm

The tradition of making soup is probably at least 25,000 years old, says one archaeologist.
iStockphoto.com

Soup comes in many variations — chicken noodle, creamy tomato, potato and leek, to name a few. But through much of human history, soup was much simpler, requiring nothing more than boiling a haunch of meat or other chunk of food in water to create a warm, nourishing broth.

So who concocted that first bowl of soup?

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2:55am

Wed February 6, 2013
Research News

Why You Love That Ikea Table, Even If It's Crooked

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 10:51 am

Building your own stuff boosts your feelings of pride and competence, and also signals to others that you are competent.
iStockphoto.com

Have you ever spent a couple of hours working on a craft project — or a presentation for work — and then fallen in love with what you've accomplished? Do the colors you've picked for your PowerPoint background pop so beautifully that you just have to sit back and admire your own genius?

If so, get in line: You're the latest person to fall victim to the Ikea Effect.

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4:19pm

Tue February 5, 2013
Shots - Health News

Exercise Can Be Good For The Heart, And Maybe For Sperm, Too

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 10:39 am

Human sperm race to fertilize an egg.
David M. Phillips Science Source

Guys, it may be time to get off the couch and hit the treadmill — especially if you want to have kids.

Okay, we all know that exercise is good for us. It can reduce the risk of obesity, diabetes and heart disease, to name a few benefits. Now researchers say physical activity may also help keep sperm healthy and happy.

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