Science

7:11am

Fri November 16, 2012
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

There Are No Bad, Lazy, Stupid Children

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 3:01 pm

Walk into a 3rd-grade classroom and see children negotiating an obstacle course: desks, chairs and boxes create tunnels through which the students are crawling. A whistle blows and the students freeze in place; when a bell sounds, the kids once again negotiate their makeshift maze.

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5:30pm

Thu November 15, 2012
Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond

In Sandy's Wake, A Reshaped Coastline

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 11:55 am

Sandy punched a hole in the barrier island that holds the affluent borough of Mantoloking, N.J., temporarily splitting the community in two. The storm also destroyed several multimillion-dollar homes and erased the island's protective system of dunes.
Doug Mills AP

New Jersey's most affluent community, Mantoloking, sits on a narrow barrier island 30 miles north of Long Beach. As Sandy approached, most of the residents fled inland. But Edwin C. O'Malley and his father, Edwin J. O'Malley Jr., hunkered down in their 130-year-old house.

They tied a boat to their porch and then watched the storm surge break over the dunes and flood the streets.

"Overnight that night, lying in bed, I could actually hear waves hitting the side of the house — which obviously made it more difficult to get to sleep," the younger O'Malley says.

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5:01pm

Thu November 15, 2012
Law

BP Agrees To Pay $4.5 Billion For Gulf Oil Spill

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 11:55 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

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3:31pm

Thu November 15, 2012
Environment

Loophole Lets Toxic Oil Water Flow Over Indian Land

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 11:55 am

Dirty water from the oil wells flows through oil-caked pipes into a settling pit where trucks vacuum off the oil. A net covers the pit to keep out birds and other wildlife. Streams of this wastewater flow through the reservation and join natural creeks and rivers.
Elizabeth Shogren NPR

The air reeks so strongly of rotten eggs that tribal leader Wes Martel hesitates to get out of the car at an oil field on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming. He already has a headache from the fumes he smelled at another oil field.

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1:56pm

Thu November 15, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

Mugged By Sound, Rescued By A Waitress

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 5:23 pm

Vimeo

You walk into a room. There are people there, cars outside, dogs, phones ring, the radio is on, somebody coughs; it's the pleasant blur of a busy world, until something, someone catches your attention. Then you lean in, the other sounds fade back, and you focus. That's how listening works — for most of us.

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10:43am

Thu November 15, 2012
Shots - Health News

A Peek Inside Rappers' Brains Shows Roots Of Improvisation

Some rappers have an impressive ability to make up lyrics on the fly, in a style known as freestyle rap.

These performers have a lot in common with jazz musicians, it turns out.

Scientists have found artists in both genres are using their brains in similar ways when they improvise.

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3:08pm

Wed November 14, 2012
Author Interviews

A Young Reporter Chronicles Her 'Brain On Fire'

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 5:47 pm

Susannah Cahalan is a reporter and book reviewer at the New York Post.
Julie Stapen Free Press

In 2009, Susannah Cahalan was a healthy 24-year-old reporter for the New York Post, when she began to experience numbness, paranoia, sensitivity to light and erratic behavior. Grasping for an answer, Cahalan asked herself as it was happening, "Am I just bad at my job — is that why? Is the pressure of it getting to me? Is it a new relationship?"

But Cahalan only got worse — she began to experience seizures, hallucinations, increasingly psychotic behavior and even catatonia. Her symptoms frightened family members and baffled a series of doctors.

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2:26pm

Wed November 14, 2012
Sports

Out Of Bounds: High Schools Should Ban Football

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 2:39 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

There's been plenty of discussion about head injuries in professional football, new equipment, new lawsuits and new rules as well. Inevitably, the conversation came to include high schools, most prominently when a school board member in - near Philadelphia proposed to end the football program. There's also been, sometimes, angry pushback. Last month, the discussion opened again in Dover, New Hampshire.

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12:47pm

Wed November 14, 2012
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Embracing Your Inner Robot: A Singular Vision Of The Future

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 5:13 pm

"Child-robot with Biomimetic Body" (or CB2) at Osaka University in Japan in 2009, where the android was slowly developing social skills by interacting with humans and watching their facial expressions, mimicking a mother-baby relationship.
Yoshikazu Tsuno AFP/Getty Images

10:19am

Wed November 14, 2012
The Salt

Raise A Toast To Building Better Beer Bubbles Through Chemistry

You'll be seeing more of this white foamy stuff on top of the beers of the future, thanks to a recent genetic discovery.
Enrico Boscariol iStockphoto

Scientists may have finally solved a problem that has plagued beer drinkers for ages: Insufficient foam resiliency.

As any beer drinker can tell you, a tall glass of lager without a white, foamy head on top just doesn't look right. And even if you start out with one, it can dissipate fast. And that's just sad.

Now, microbiologists have identified the specific gene in yeast responsible for a beer's head and they say this discovery can lead to stronger, longer lasting, more aesthetically pleasing foam on your favorite brews.

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