Science

6:01pm

Thu February 28, 2013
Business

Texas Study Points To A Longer Natural Gas Boom

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 6:59 pm

A natural gas drilling rig just east of downtown Fort Worth, Texas. A new decade-long study finds the region's Barnett Shale formation has sufficient gas reserves to last another 25 years.
David Kent MCT/Landov/Fort Worth Star Telegram

There are few things in life more joyful than discovering a giant oil or natural gas field in Texas. You're suddenly rich beyond your wildest dreams. When the scope and size of the natural gas reservoir in the Barnett Shale in North Texas first became apparent, there were predictions that the find would last 100 years.

Well, that was over the top. But University of Texas geology professor Scott Tinker, who designed and authored a new study of the Barnett Shale, says there's still a lot of gas down there, even after a decade of drilling.

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4:32pm

Thu February 28, 2013
Energy

Outgoing Energy Secretary Could Be Remembered For More Than Solyndra

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 6:30 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The outgoing energy secretary, Steven Chu, got a rousing ovation this week when he spoke at a summit on energy innovation. But his tenure has been clouded by the department's investment in alternative energy companies that later failed, most notably Solyndra. As Chu leaves office, his real legacy may be the government's ongoing search for energy breakthroughs. NPR's Scott Horsley tells us more.

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11:53am

Thu February 28, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

MIT Invents A Machine That Can Look At Batman's Face And See His Heart Beating

The New York Times YouTube

My pal Erik Olsen at The New York Times has just described an extraordinary new way to look at people. You point a camera at someone, record the image and then, using an "amplifier," you can discover things you've never seen before.

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11:52am

Thu February 28, 2013
NPR Story

String Theory: Fascinating, Not Science Fiction

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 12:11 pm

Tell Me More has been honoring Black History Month by speaking with African-Americans who've excelled in STEM fields — science, technology, engineering and math. Sylvester James Gates Jr. spent his career researching string theory. He explains to host Michel Martin that, while it seems like science fiction, it's really anything but.

10:43am

Thu February 28, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

Go Away! I Want You As Far Away From Me As Possible (How Big Is The Universe?)

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 2:13 pm

Minute Physics YouTube

If you were the Lord High Poo-bah of the Planet Xantar, and you wanted to banish someone to the farthest edge of the universe, here's a handy dandy instruction manual that ...

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9:38am

Thu February 28, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

The Napoleon Chagnon Wars Flare Up Again In Anthropology

A member of the Ya̧nomamö people at Irotatheri community in Venezuela's Amazonas state, near the Brazilian border, in September 2012.
Leo Ramirez AFP/Getty Images

The Fierce People. That's what anthropologist Napoleon Chagnon called the indigenous Ya̧nomamö Indians of Venezuela in his 1968 book Ya̧nomamö: The Fierce People. It's one of the best-selling anthropology texts of all time and is still in wide use.

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6:16pm

Wed February 27, 2013
Space

First Space Tourist Sets Sights On A Mars Mission

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 6:23 pm

Space tourist Dennis Tito celebrates after his landing near the Kazakh town of Arkalyk on May 6, 2001.
Alexander Nemenov AFP/Getty Images

The world's first space tourist is financing a project that aims to launch an American man and woman on a mission to fly by Mars in 2018.

Back in 2001, businessman Dennis Tito shelled out about $20 million to ride a Russian spaceship up to the International Space Station. Now he's unveiled a new nonprofit group called the Inspiration Mars Foundation.

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2:23pm

Wed February 27, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

The End Of The Universe, The Higgs And All The 'Ifs'

Don't panic! The end of the Universe (as we know it) isn't likely to hit us for billions of years, if it comes at all. Pictured: the Milky Way rises above the ESO's ALMA facility in Chile.
José Francisco Salgado ESO

As if calling the Higgs particle "the God particle" didn't cause enough confusion and misinformation, here we go again, with the Higgs hitting the spotlight once more, but now as prophet of doom.

Yes, dear readers, it seems that the destiny of the Universe is in the hands of this particle or, more precisely, of the value of its mass.

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12:14pm

Wed February 27, 2013
The Two-Way

Highest Bidder Will Get DNA Pioneer's Nobel Medal

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 6:43 pm

Francis Crick in 2003, the year before his death, at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in San Diego.
Denis Poroy AP

This is no ordinary family heirloom.

The granddaughter of English scientist Francis Crick, the co-discoverer of the structure of DNA who passed away in 2004, is putting his Nobel Prize medal up on the auction block.

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11:02am

Wed February 27, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Dispatch From CERN: Which Higgs?

A visualization of proton-proton collision events recorded by the Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN).
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

This week I'm at CERN (with co-blogger Stuart Kauffman), the high-energy physics laboratory where, last July, the Higgs particle was found. Yesterday, we heard from Sergio Bertolucci, CERN's director of research and scientific computing.

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