Science

9:23am

Fri April 12, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

For The Love Of The Game: Play Ball!

The Mets' Lucas Duda celebrates a homerun against the Phillies with Kirk Nieuwenhuis on Wednesday. Despite the shot, the Phillies won 7-3.
Drew Hallowell Getty Images

For some not inconsiderable portion of the population, life reorganizes itself each spring with the start of the baseball season. Until now, my role in the baseball eco-system has been clear. I am a fan. I watch baseball, and I think about it. A lot. My ex-wife once referred to herself in my presence as a baseball widow. I don't really think that was fair. But it is true I don't miss a game the Mets play, time zones be damned. And it is true that love has a lot to do with it. Love of the game, yes. But really: love of my team.

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3:29am

Fri April 12, 2013
Space

In NASA's Budget: Plans To 'Shrink-Wrap' An Asteroid

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 10:55 am

A NASA mission proposed in President Obama's budget would involve capturing an asteroid and pulling it into Earth's orbit for observation.
NASA/Advanced Concepts Laboratory

When President Obama released his 2014 budget for the federal government on Wednesday, much of it was spreadsheets and tables. But one corner of NASA's budget looked like something out of a movie script.

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5:01pm

Thu April 11, 2013
Environment

Climate Change Could Bump Up Instances Of Turbulence

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 5:49 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Bring on the air sickness bags and light up the fasten seatbelt sign. A new study finds that flights are going to become more turbulent due to climate change. Paul Williams led the study. It's been published in the journal Nature Climate Change and he joins me now from Vienna. Welcome to the program.

PAUL WILLIAMS: Hi, Melissa, it's a pleasure to be here.

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4:21pm

Thu April 11, 2013
Space

Origin Of 'Mercury' Meteorite Still Puzzles Scientists

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 8:18 am

Several fragments of this unusual rock were discovered last year in Morocco. It's been hailed as the first meteorite from the planet Mercury, but where it came from in the solar system isn't certain.
Stefan Ralew

A strange green rock discovered in Morocco last year was hailed by the press as the first meteorite from Mercury. But scientists who've been puzzling over the stone ever since say the accumulating evidence may point in a different direction. Maybe, just maybe, they say, the 4.56-billion-year-old rock fell to Earth from the asteroid belt located between Mars and Jupiter.

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4:17pm

Thu April 11, 2013
The Salt

A Legal Twist In The Effort To Ban Cameras From Livestock Plants

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 4:38 pm

Cows wait to be milked at a California dairy farm.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

For years, undercover videos documenting animal cruelty at farms and slaughterhouses have cast the nation's meat and dairy farmers in a grim light.

In response, the livestock industry supported legislative efforts in multiple states designed to keep cameras from recording without permission in livestock plants. The Salt reported on these efforts, which activists call "ag gag" bills, last year.

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2:37pm

Thu April 11, 2013
Shots - Health News

On Call In The Wild: Animals Play Doctor, Too

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 9:01 am

Is there a doctor in the house? Chimpanzees eat certain plants to rid themselves of parasites.
iStockphoto.com

What do animals do when they get sick? They can't go to the doctor's office. They can't go to the pharmacy. Heck, they can't even go online.

Nevertheless, a surprising number of wild creatures have figured out ways to use herbs, resins, and even alcohol and nicotine for health's sake.

Scientists review the ranks of animal pharmacists in the latest issue of Science.

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1:38pm

Thu April 11, 2013
Shots - Health News

Leading Man's Chin: Universally Hot Or Not?

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 9:02 am

Two prominent chins meet: Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman kiss in the 1946 thriller Notorious.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Cary Grant's chin may appeal to you and Ingrid Bergman. But that might not be the case among the indigenous people of Australia.

And the idea that a guy's jutting jawline might not cause women the world over to swoon calls into question the notion that some characteristics are pretty much automatic signals of desirability for prospective mates, researchers say.

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12:25pm

Thu April 11, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

Is This Science Journalism? Nah. Then What Is It?

Rethink Canada

Journalism may not be the right word for this. It's a kind of reporting. What you see here is true, and carefully edited.

It's not art, though the images are sharp and concentrated.

It's more than advertising, (though that's its purpose) because it is telling you something abstract and true about the world, like a lesson.

It's not education. It's too sassy, too clever. Too beautiful.

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9:18am

Thu April 11, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

When Animals Mourn: Seeing That Grief Is Not Uniquely Human

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 9:56 am

An elephant at the Emmen, Netherlands, zoo stands at the edge of a ditch in 2009, a day after another elephant fell into the ditch and died.
Olaf Kraak AFP/Getty Images

Eleanor was the matriarch of an elephant family called the First Ladies. One day, elephant researchers in Kenya's Samburu National Reserve saw that Eleanor was bruised and dragging her trunk on the ground. Soon, she collapsed.

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7:17pm

Wed April 10, 2013
Shots - Health News

How Much Does It Hurt? Let's Scan Your Brain

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 3:16 pm

A technique for imaging the brain allowed researchers to distinguish between physical and emotional pain.
Courtesy of Tom Wager

Scientists reported Wednesday that they had developed a way to measure how much pain people are experiencing by scanning their brains.

The researchers hope the technique will help doctors treat pain better, but the work is also raising concerns about whether the technique might interfere with doctors simply listening to their patients.

Now, when someone is in pain, a doctor has no way to judge its severity except to ask questions, a method that often is inadequate.

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