Science

1:40pm

Thu July 2, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Great White Sharks And The Thrill Of Unseen Nature

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 3:45 pm

Marc Henauer iStockimages

Last Thursday, boat captain Giancarlo Thomae — flying in a helicopter over the Aptos, Calif., coastline — spotted and photographed what he called a "once in a lifetime event." There were 15 great white sharks swimming within a quarter-mile radius of the grounded SS Palo Alto ("the cement ship") just offshore.

"In my 20-plus years at sea, I have never seen anything like this," Thomae noted to media.

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1:37pm

Thu July 2, 2015
The Two-Way

Russian Rocket Poised For Crucial Supply Run To Space Station

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 6:45 pm

On Friday, a Russian Soyuz rocket will send an unmanned cargo ship with more than 3 tons of food, water and fuel for astronauts aboard the International Space Station.
Russian Federal Space Agency

The stakes are high for a routine cargo mission to the International Space Station, after a string of failures has left the orbiting outpost running somewhat low on supplies.

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5:08am

Thu July 2, 2015
Research News

Not All Online Restaurant Reviews Are Created Equal

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 7:32 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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4:39pm

Wed July 1, 2015
Shots - Health News

How Your Brain Remembers Where You Parked The Car

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 2:48 pm

The experiment used a fake photo of actor Clint Eastwood and Pisa's leaning tower to test how the brain links person and place.
Courtesy of Matias Ison/Neuron

If you run into an old friend at the train station, your brain will probably form a memory of the experience. And that memory will forever link the person you saw with the place where you saw him.

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1:56pm

Wed July 1, 2015
The Salt

The Scallop Scoop: Survey Forecasts A Banner Year In Atlantic

Originally published on Wed July 1, 2015 7:08 pm

NOAA scientists estimate they saw about 10 billion sea scallops off Delaware and southern New Jersey this spring as part of an annual survey.
Andrew Martinez Science Source

Scallop fishermen off the East Coast could soon see one of their biggest bumper crops ever. A federal survey in waters off Delaware is predicting a boom in the next couple of years for the nation's most valuable fishery.

Every year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration looks for young sea scallops on the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. This year, when they stuck their camera in the water, they got a huge shock, says Dvora Hart, a research analyst with NOAA's Fisheries Service.

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9:32am

Wed July 1, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Designing Superhumans

iStockphoto

The age of genetic design is here.

It is now possible to edit genes of diverse organisms — almost like we edit a string of text — by cutting and pasting (splicing) genes at desired locations. A recent technology known as CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) allows for the targeted control over cellular organization, regulation and behavior. CRISPR has its origins in the immune systems of bacteria, using short RNA sequences to disrupt the genetic structure of foreign attackers.

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4:40am

Wed July 1, 2015
Shots - Health News

Benefits Of Sports To A Child's Mind And Heart All Part Of The Game

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 5:24 pm

Ten-year-old Jake Herrera and his Los Angeles team run around the diamond as a warmup for baseball practice.
Benjamin B. Morris for NPR

Amy Roegler and her husband, Octavio Herrera, live with their young kids, Jake and Alyssa, in Los Angeles. When it comes to pro baseball, they're all Dodgers fans. And Jake loved balls even as a baby, Octavio says.

"We have a picture of him as a 3-month-old with a little Dodger jersey and a glove," Octavio says. "So he was definitely going to be introduced to sports early, and he took to it right away." Today 10-year-old Jake is on his baseball league's All-Star team.

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4:20pm

Tue June 30, 2015
All Tech Considered

Flood Maps Can Get Much Sharper With A Little Supercomputing Oomph

Originally published on Wed July 1, 2015 12:42 am

This is a calculated flood map for the city of St. Louis. Water depth goes from deep (dark blue) to shallow (white, light blue). Floodwater can come from the Illinois, Upper Mississippi and Missouri rivers, as well as from heavy local precipitation.
Courtesy of Dag Lohmann/Katrisk

A small company in California is hoping to make a big splash by providing detailed flood maps to homeowners and insurance companies. And to do that, the company is using one of the fastest supercomputers in the world.

The company is called Katrisk, based in Berkeley, Calif. Hydrologist and computer modeler Dag Lohmann is one of the company's founders. He says the flood maps the Federal Emergency Management Agency already produces will tell you how prone a particular area is to flooding.

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4:15pm

Tue June 30, 2015
Science

To Keep Up With Earth's Rotation, Clocks Will Tick An Extra Second Tonight

Originally published on Wed July 1, 2015 3:40 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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3:16pm

Tue June 30, 2015
The Two-Way

Venus And Jupiter Set For A Close Encounter Tuesday Night

Originally published on Tue June 30, 2015 4:31 pm

A NASA projection shows the path of Venus and Jupiter; the two planets will converge in the Earth's sky Tuesday night.
YouTube

It's not as if two worlds will collide tonight — Venus and Jupiter are only converging into a small area of the Earth's sky. NASA says the two bright planets will be "a jaw-dropping one-third of a degree apart."

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