Science

9:51am

Fri July 12, 2013
TED Radio Hour

Why Does Wikipedia Work?

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 9:47 am

Jimmy Wales, the founder of Wikipedia, speaking at TED.
Robert Leslie TED

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Why We Collaborate.

About Jimmy Wales' TEDTalk

Founder of Wikipedia Jimmy Wales recalls how he assembled "a ragtag band of volunteers," gave them tools for collaborating to create a self-organizing, self-correcting, never-finished online encyclopedia.

About Jimmy Wales

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2:46am

Fri July 12, 2013
Environment

Sweeping Parts Of Southern Seas Could Become A Nature Preserve

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 8:37 pm

The "Giant Tabular Iceberg" floats in Antarctica's Ross Sea in December 2011. Under a proposed new international agreement, large sections of the oceans around Antarctica would become protected as a marine preserve.
Camille Seaman Barcroft Media/Landov

The area of ocean set aside as a nature preserve could double or triple in the coming days, depending on the outcome of a meeting in Germany. Representatives from 24 countries and the European Union are considering setting aside large portions of ocean around Antarctica as a protected area. And the deal may hinge on preserving some fishing rights.

There are two proposals on the table: One would set aside huge parts of the Southern Ocean around East Antarctica; the other would focus on the Ross Sea, south of New Zealand.

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6:13pm

Thu July 11, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

To The '13.7' Community: I Love You, Man!

iStockphoto.com

Two hundred and eleven comments and counting — about poetry! We here at 13.7 have come to understand what the hot-button issues are for most people. The strongest responses happen in reaction to posts about religion and science, animal welfare, diet and children's issues.

Then — unexpectedly — my post on the relationship between science and poetry launched a vibrant and compelling discussion about the nature and importance of poetry.

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6:01pm

Thu July 11, 2013
The Salt

Are Antibiotics On The Farm Risky Business?

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 5:25 pm

These pigs, newly weaned from their mothers, are at their most vulnerable stage of life. They're getting antibiotics in their water to ward off bacterial infection.
Dan Charles NPR

You've probably seen the labels on meat in the store: "Raised without antibiotics." They're a selling point for people who don't like how many drugs are used on chickens, turkey, hogs and beef cattle.

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5:26pm

Thu July 11, 2013
Shots - Health News

Failure To Communicate Between Doctors And Men About PSA Test

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 9:11 am

At least they're talking.
iStockphoto.com

The PSA test has been dissed a lot lately. The nation's preventive medicine task force, for one, says the test is so unreliable in figuring out who's at risk for deadly prostate cancer that most men shouldn't bother getting one.

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4:53pm

Thu July 11, 2013
Environment

Wastewater Wells, Geothermal Power Triggering Earthquakes

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 5:55 pm

A geothermal energy plant near the Salton Sea in California taps deep underground heat from the southern San Andreas Fault rift zone. A new study ties the amount of water pulled from the ground by the geothermal plant here to the frequency of earthquakes.
David McNew Getty Images

The continental U.S. experiences small earthquakes every day. But over the past few years, their numbers have been increasing. Geoscientists say the new epidemic of quakes is related to industrial wastewater being pumped into underground storage wells.

Now there's new research that reveals two trigger mechanisms that may be setting off these wastewater quakes — other, larger earthquakes (some as far away as Indonesia), and the activity at geothermal power plants.

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4:07pm

Thu July 11, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Running The Paleo-Race, Celebrating Meat

Predator or prey? You'll have to choose sides when you take part in a Track Meat event.
Courtesy of Track Meat

Looking for an unusual 5K obstacle race this summer? Feeling a need to reconnect with a 40,000-year-ago paleo lifestyle? Craving some meat?

For anyone who can get to Lake Odessa, Michigan, on August 10, Track Meat may be the event for you.

At Track Meat, competitors will sign up to run as prey or predator. Dressing as "cavemen or cavewomen" is optional.

The organizers' philosophy is pithy enough:

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2:32pm

Thu July 11, 2013
The Two-Way

True, Blue Planet Found Orbiting Nearby Star

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 2:37 pm

Move over, Earth. There's another blue planet in town — or at least in our corner of the Milky Way.

Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope deduced for the first time the atmospheric hue of a planet outside our own solar system — and it turns out to be a "deep cobalt blue."

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12:24pm

Thu July 11, 2013
All Tech Considered

The Man Who Predicted Google Glass Forecasts The Near Future

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 12:44 pm

Physicist and writer David Brin, in Xian, China.
Courtesy of David Brin

Google Glass isn't even available to the public yet. But the wearable technology that packs a tiny computer into a lightweight frame has already faced mockery, condemnation, fear and threats of regulation. As NPR's Steve Henn reported in May:

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12:04pm

Thu July 11, 2013
Race

Study: Whites Think Black People Feel Less Pain

Racial disparities exist, but what causes them can be complicated. Harvard anthropology student Jason Silverstein says it has to do with a lack of empathy. Host Michel Michel Martin talks with Silverstein about a Slate article he wrote titled, 'I Don't Feel Your Pain.'

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