Science

3:20pm

Wed July 17, 2013
The Two-Way

Newly Discovered Dinosaur Sure Had One 'Supersize Schnoz'

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 7:11 pm

An artist's image of Nasutoceratops titusi.
Lukas Panzarin for the Natural History Museum of Utah

The Proceedings of the Royal Society politely refers to it as a "short-snouted horned dinosaur."

National Geographic is less reserved and gets right to the obvious point: "Paleontologists have discovered a new dinosaur, a Triceratops relative with a supersize schnoz that once roamed present-day Utah."

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3:19pm

Wed July 17, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

'Blackfish' Takes Aim At SeaWorld

In a photo released by SeaWorld San Diego, Kasatka, a killer whale who is approximately 37 years old, swims with her newborn calf in February 2013.
Mike Aguilera/SeaWorld San Diego Getty Images

Blackfish, a movie opening Friday in New York and Los Angeles, takes aim squarely at theme parks like SeaWorld where captive dolphins, including orcas or killer whales, perform in entertainment shows for the public.

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3:01am

Wed July 17, 2013
Joe's Big Idea

All Charged Up: Engineers Create A Battery Made Of Wood

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 5:08 am

Wood fibers are coated with carbon nanotubes and then packed into small disks of metal. The sodium ions moving around in the wood fibers create an electric current.
Heather Rousseau NPR

The big idea behind Joe's Big Idea is to report on interesting inventions and inventors. When I saw the headline "An Environmentally Friendly Battery Made From Wood," on a press release recently, I figured it fit the bill, so went to investigate.

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3:00am

Wed July 17, 2013
The Salt

In Oregon, The GMO Wheat Mystery Deepens

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 4:34 pm

Wheat grows in a test field at Oregon State University in Corvallis. Some scientists believe that there's a chance that genetically modified wheat found in one farmer's field in May is still in the seed supply.
Natalie Behring Bloomberg via Getty Images

The strange case of genetically engineered wheat on a farm in Oregon remains as mysterious as ever. If anything, it's grown more baffling.

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7:56pm

Tue July 16, 2013
Television

McCarthy's Vaccination Stance Complicates Job On 'The View'

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 8:59 pm

Jenny McCarthy, a regular guest host on The View, has been selected as a permanent co-host beginning in September. The appointment has sparked controversy because of McCarthy's anti-vaccination advocacy.
Donna Svennevik ABC via Getty Images

The newest co-host for Barbara Walters' chatfest The View is a vivacious and outspoken model, actor and activist for children, seemingly a perfect person to have at the table of the successful network talk show.

But Jenny McCarthy is also one of the nation's leading skeptics about the safety of vaccines. And in that role, ABC's newest star has stirred consternation.

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4:53pm

Tue July 16, 2013
Science

Eavesdropping On Nature Gives Clues To Biodiversity

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 10:00 pm

Scientists could use recordings of wildlife to monitor the movements of invasive species like the European starling.
Liz Leyden iStockphoto.com

Biology professor Mitch Aide uses his ears to learn about the frogs, birds and insects that are all around him. This scientist at the University of Puerto Rico is trying to track how animal populations are affected by a world that's under increasing pressure from human activities.

Aide says, "We would like to have five, 10, 20 years of data of how populations are changing."

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4:49pm

Tue July 16, 2013
The Salt

Can Oysters With No Sex Life Repopulate The Chesapeake Bay?

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 8:00 pm

Young oysters live on old oyster shells and slowly mature while forming a complete shell.
Astrid Riecken Washington Post/Getty Images

The Chesapeake Bay once supplied half the world's oyster market. But pollution, disease and over-harvesting have nearly wiped out the population. It's a dire situation that's united former adversaries to revive the oyster ecosystem and industry.

Scientists and watermen have joined forces to plant underwater farms in the bay with a special oyster bred in a lab. Called triploid oysters, they have been selected for attributes like disease tolerance and fast growth.

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12:18pm

Tue July 16, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Reading Science: A Story Of Consensus And Community

Located 1,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Perseus, a reflection nebula called NGC 1333 epitomizes the beautiful chaos of a dense group of stars being born. Most of the visible light from the young stars in this region is obscured by the dense, dusty cloud in which they formed.
Spitzer Space Telescope NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. A. Gutermuth

How does science make progress? How do scientists know what they claim to know? What does it mean when scientists say they have come to a consensus?

These questions are far more than academic. We live in a world where issues of science and technology dominate headlines and policy. In that way, science and its claims effect the very real world choices we all face in domains as varied as climate change, genetically modified foods and the uses of Big Data.

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3:16am

Tue July 16, 2013
Animals

Om Nom Nom: T. Rex Was, Indeed, A Voracious Hunter

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 10:44 am

Mind The Teeth: Fossils indicate that Tyrannosaurus rex was an active hunter, in addition to being a scavenger. And in Jurassic Park, it also had a sweet tooth for lawyers.
Universal Pictures Getty Images

Tyrannosaurus rex is perhaps one of the most famous animals to have ever roamed the Earth. This huge, fierce meat-eater has graced Hollywood films as the perpetual villain, and it has played a notorious role in the science community that studies it, too.

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3:48pm

Mon July 15, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Human Emotions Explained In 60 Short Interviews

iStockphoto.com

In some sense we're all experts in emotion. We experience emotion every day, all the time. We constantly observe the emotional responses of others, and we often make decisions based on anticipated emotions: we pursue something because we think it will make us happy, or avoid something because we worry it will anger someone else.

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