Science

11:22am

Fri May 10, 2013
NPR Story

Exploring An Ever-Expanding Universe

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 1:23 pm

Saul Perlmutter shared the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics for his discovery that the universe was expanding at an accelerating rate. Perlmutter explains how supernovae and other astronomical artifacts are used to measure the expansion rate, and explains what physicists are learning about "dark energy" — the mysterious entity thought to be driving the acceleration.

8:03am

Fri May 10, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

Music, Inside Out

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 11:40 am

Daniel Sierra Oscillate/Vimeo

What would it be like to be a string that made music? Not anything simple, like a guitar string or a cello string, but a magical string, a sine curve that's taut then loose, that doubles then doubles again, that sheds then dissolves into showers of notes — a flaming, sighing, looping, dissolving string. Curious?

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5:04am

Fri May 10, 2013
Research News

What Does 'Sexual Coercion' Say About A Society?

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 11:46 am

One contemporary analysis links the increase in gender equality in a society with increased sexual empowerment of women and less sexual coercion. But there's more to it than that.
iStockphoto.com

Anthropologists, sociologists and biologists have explored over several decades many factors that shape the likelihood of sexual coercion of women by men.

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5:11pm

Thu May 9, 2013
The Salt

Big Ag Agrees to Conserve Cropland, But At What Cost?

Peanut plants grow on a Halifax, N.C., farm that received federal subsidies in 2011.
Robert Willett MCT /Landov

Taxpayers help subsidize crop insurance premiums for farmers to the tune of about $9 billion dollars, a figure that's growing each year. These policies protect farmers from major losses, and help support their income even if there's no loss of crops.

And in return? Well, environmentalists argue that farmers who receive this financial support should be required to be good stewards of the land.

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4:34pm

Thu May 9, 2013
Science

Could You Talk To A Caveman? Scientists Say It's Possible

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 5:41 pm

Would Mel Brooks' famous 2,000-Year-Old Man have understood modern language? Researchers say there's a possibility.
ABC/Photofest

In 1961, Mel Brooks and Carl Reiner came up with some basic theories of caveman linguistics in their 2,000-Year-Old Man skit. Most of them had to do with rocks, as in, "What are you doing with that rock there?"

Now, a professor in England has questioned the validity of the famous caveman's rock-centric theories. And Mark Pagel of the University of Reading is reaching even further back, to the time of the 15,000-year-old man.

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4:34pm

Thu May 9, 2013
Shots - Health News

How Can Identical Twins Turn Out So Different?

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 5:41 pm

But what about their personalities?
iStockphoto.com

A study of genetically identical mice is providing some hints about humans. How can one identical twin be a wallflower while the other is the life of the party?

The study of 40 young mice found that their behavior grew increasingly different over three months, even though the mice shared the same genes and lived in the same five-level cage, researchers report Thursday in the journal Science.

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2:14pm

Thu May 9, 2013
Shots - Health News

Using Bacteria To Swat Malaria Inside Mosquitoes

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 11:10 am

More than a hundred different species of Anopheles mosquitoes can transmit malaria to people.
Adam Cole NPR

It's a bit like probiotics for mosquitoes.

When scientists infect mosquitoes with a specific bacterium, the insects become resistant to the malaria parasite.

Sounds like an easy way to stamp out malaria, right? Just introduce the infected mosquitoes into an area and let the bugs take over the natural population.

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2:00pm

Thu May 9, 2013
Health

No Longer Experimental, Egg Freezing May Appeal To More Women

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 2:44 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Between the ages of 36 and 38, Sarah Elizabeth Richards spent $50,000 to have her eggs frozen. That wiped out her savings and the money her parents had set aside for a wedding, and she writes, it was the best investment I ever made. Improved technology gives women the choice to freeze their eggs when they're younger and schedule motherhood when they're ready. The experimental status of this procedure was lifted last year.

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1:49pm

Thu May 9, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Cultural Sexism: What If Amanda Knox Had Been Andrew Knox?

Amanda Knox listens to questions during her trial in Perugia, Italy, on June 12, 2009.
Tiziana Fabi AFP/Getty Images

Sexual thrill-seeker. Sex-mad flatmate.

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9:42am

Thu May 9, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

Moths That Drive Cars (Really)

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 10:07 am

YouTube

What you are about to see — and I'm not making this up — is a moth driving a car.

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