Science

12:13pm

Wed May 15, 2013
Shots - Health News

Scientists Clone Human Embryos To Make Stem Cells

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 11:57 am

A scientist removes the nucleus from a human egg using a pipette. This is the first step to making personalized embryonic stem cells.
Courtesy of OHSU Photos

Scientists say they have, for the first time, cloned human embryos capable of producing embryonic stem cells.

The accomplishment is a long-sought step toward harnessing the potential power of embryonic stem cells to treat many human diseases. But the work also raises a host of ethical concerns.

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12:11pm

Wed May 15, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

For The Love Of Science: A Call To Action

Originally published on Wed May 15, 2013 1:06 pm

Mountains in the area where Marcelo first explored the wonders of the natural world.
Leonardo Pallotta Flickr

People often ask me how I got interested in science. I wish I could answer that I had a mentor when I was a child, that a biologist or a physicist visited my school when I was in third grade and transformed my life. But that's not what happened to me and, sadly, not what happens to the vast majority of children.

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6:17pm

Tue May 14, 2013
The Two-Way

Road Crew In Belize Destroys Ancient Pyramid

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 6:53 pm

What's left of the Nohmul pyramid after a construction crew virtually destroyed the 2,300-year-old Mayan structure.
Jaime Awe Associated Press

A construction crew in search of gravel to use as road filler used its backhoes to level one of Belize's largest Mayan pyramids.

"It's a feeling of incredible disbelief because of the ignorance and the insensitivity ... they were using this for road fill," Jaime Awe, the head of the Belize Institute of Archaeology, said of the destruction at the 2,300-year-old Nohmul pyramid, located in the Orange Walk/Corozal area.

"It's like being punched in the stomach. It's just so horrendous," Awe said Monday of the destruction thought to have occurred last week.

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4:56pm

Tue May 14, 2013
Environment

'Ice Shove' Damages Some Manitoba Homes Beyond Repair

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 7:15 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

In northern lakefront vacation spots such as Ochre Beach, Manitoba and Lake Mille Lacs, Minnesota, ice happens even in May. But what happened this past weekend was like something out of a science fiction movie.

(SOUNDBITE OF WIND)

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is the sound from a video recorded as constant strong winds pushed huge sheets of ice off a lake and onto the shore. Fingers of ice creeped farther inland and farther. It's as if the ice is alive.

(SOUNDBITE OF ICE SHOVE)

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4:56pm

Tue May 14, 2013
Energy

India, China Could Soon Demand More Oil Than U.S. And Europe

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 7:15 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

For years, we've understood the global oil landscape in fairly simple terms: Saudi Arabia and other Middle Eastern countries were the big producers of oil, the United States and its allies were the big oil buyers. But a report today from the International Energy Agency shows a different picture. Turns out the U.S. has become a star oil producer, as NPR's Tom Gjelten reports.

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4:47pm

Tue May 14, 2013
The Two-Way

Huge Boost In U.S. Oil Output Set To Transform Global Market

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 5:48 pm

IEA chief Maria van der Hoeven, seen in a 2011 photo, said that North American production has set off a "supply shock that is sending ripples throughout the world."
AFP AFP/Getty Images

U.S. oil production is rising sharply and increased output from shale will be a "game changer" in global energy markets in the coming years, according to a new report out Tuesday by the International Energy Agency.

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3:17pm

Tue May 14, 2013
Environment

With Rising Seas, America's Birthplace Could Disappear

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 7:15 pm

Colonists built the original glass-blowing kiln in Jamestown, Va., at this beach for easy access to the sand. Now the site is just inches above the water level.
John W. Poole NPR

By the end of the century, the birthplace of America may be underwater.

The first successful English colony in America was at Jamestown, Va., a swampy island in the Chesapeake Bay. The colony endured for almost a century, and remnants of the place still exist. You can go there and see the ruins. You can walk where Capt. John Smith and Pocahontas walked. But Jamestown is now threatened by rising sea levels that scientists say could submerge the island by century's end.

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2:14pm

Tue May 14, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Noir Through Space And Time

There's always a girl and there's always a gun: the Hero-Blaster used by Harrison Ford's character in the movie Blade Runner. The gun was up for auction in 2009.
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

Spade's arms went around her, holding her to him, muscles bulging through his blue sleeves.

That line comes from The Maltese Falcon and the guy with the blue sleeves is none other than Sam Spade. I read those words in a worn paperback copy my dad loaned me when I was 18 and I was quickly hooked. I'd fallen in love with the dark world of the noir detective. But who hasn't?

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2:12pm

Tue May 14, 2013
The Salt

Chris Hadfield: Space Chef In Chief

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 5:49 pm

Cmdr. Chris Hadfield demonstrates how to make a sandwich, space station-style.
Screenshot from YouTube

2:07pm

Tue May 14, 2013
Health

The Promise And Limitations Of Telemedicine

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. The doctor will see you now, words we've all heard many times, but more and more now doctors see their patients over a video link. For years, telemedicine has allowed doctors to treat patients anywhere, but as technology improves, new applications arise.

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