Science

11:46am

Thu October 3, 2013
The Two-Way

Tropical Storm Karen Heading For U.S. Gulf Coast

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 2:07 pm

The storm track forecast for Karen.
National Hurricane Center, Miami

Newly formed Tropical Storm Karen, which could reach hurricane strength by Friday, is expected to make landfall on the U.S. Gulf Coast sometime over the weekend.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami says the late-season storm formed Thursday morning about 485 miles south of the Mississippi Delta, with maximum sustained winds of 65 mph. It was moving north-northwest at 12 mph, but was expected to speed up.

Forecasters say it will make landfall in the U.S. either Saturday or Sunday.

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3:03am

Thu October 3, 2013
Shots - Health News

Studying The Science Behind Child Prodigies

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 12:53 pm

Cellist Matt Haimovitz made it big in the classical music scene as a little kid.
Stephanie Mackinnon

Matt Haimovitz is 42 and a world-renowned cellist. He rushed into the classical music scene at age 10 after Itzhak Perlman, the famed violinist, heard him play.

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6:05pm

Wed October 2, 2013
Shots - Health News

A DEET-Like Mosquito Spray That Smells Like Jasmine Or Grapes?

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 9:56 am

Scientists have discovered four new DEET-like mosquito repellents. Three of them are safe to eat.
Courtesy of Pinky Kai/University of California, Riverside

California scientists are reporting a pair of victories in the epic struggle between man and mosquito.

A team at the University of California, Riverside, appears to have finally figured out how bugs detect the insect repellent known as DEET. And the team used its discovery to identify several chemical compounds that promise to be safer and cheaper than DEET, according to the report in the journal Nature.

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4:45pm

Wed October 2, 2013
The Salt

Fish Guidelines For Pregnant Women May Be Too Strict, Study Suggests

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 5:22 pm

In a study of 4,000 pregnant women, fish accounted for only 7 percent of blood mercury levels.
JackF iStockphoto.com

The health benefits of eating fish are pretty well-known. A lean source of protein, fish can be a rich source of healthful omega-3 fatty acids and has been shown to benefit heart, eye and brain health.

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4:40pm

Wed October 2, 2013
Space

The Government Shutdown's Final Frontier: How NASA Is Dealing

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 10:39 am

While almost all of NASA's employees have been furloughed because of the government shutdown, ground control activities for the International Space Station are still operational. Above, astronaut Chris Cassidy on a spacewalk aboard the ISS on May 11.
AP

If ET wants to phone home, this is not the week to do it. NASA's phone lines are down, as are its website and many Twitter feeds. All have been silenced by the government shutdown, whose far-reaching consequences are now stretching into space.

The shutdown began on Tuesday, after Republicans and Democrats in the House of Representatives failed to come to an agreement over the federal budget. Most of the government's nonessential services have ground to a halt, and among the hardest hit agencies is NASA.

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4:33pm

Wed October 2, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Science: For Good Or Evil?

A warning to us all
Universal The Kobal Collection

In 1818, the 21-year-old Mary Shelley published the great (perhaps greatest) classic of gothic literature, Frankenstein, Or the Modern Prometheus. As we all know, it's the story of a brilliant and anguished doctor who wants to use the cutting-edge science of his time — the relationship between electricity and muscular motion — to bring the dead back to life. Two decades before Shelley's novel, the Italian Luigi Galvani had shown that electric pulses could make dead muscles twitch.

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2:07pm

Wed October 2, 2013
Shots - Health News

Why Eye Contact Can Fail To Win People Over

Eye contact may prove persuasive only if a person's already on your side, a study finds.
iStockphoto.com

Pop psychology holds that to connect with someone, you should look deep into their eyes. The more you look, the more persuasive you'll be. But that may work only when your audience already agrees with you.

Researchers in Germany tested the power of the eye lock by polling university students about their opinions on controversial issues like assisted suicide, nuclear energy and affirmative action in the workplace.

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3:23am

Wed October 2, 2013
The Salt

Can Millet Take On Quinoa? First, It'll Need A Makeover

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 11:37 am

This millet field outside Nunn, Colo., is nearing harvest time, when the grain turns from green to a golden color.
Luke Runyon Harvest Public Media

Walk through a health food store and you'll find amaranth, sorghum, quinoa — heritage grains that have been staples around the world for generations. Americans are just discovering them.

There's another age-old grain that grows right here on the Great Plains: millet.

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6:41pm

Tue October 1, 2013
The Two-Way

The Shutdown's Squeeze On Science And Health

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 6:52 pm

This image was posted by NASA to the agency's official Instagram account.
NASA Getty Images

In addition to shutdowns of national parks (including Alcatraz Island and Yosemite) and the supplemental nutrition program for women, infants and children, the mandatory furloughs are affecting a wide range of government science and health agencies. Here's a snapshot:

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4:26pm

Tue October 1, 2013
Youth Radio

Puberty Is Coming Earlier, But That Doesn't Mean Sex Ed Is

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 5:54 pm

A growing number of children are entering puberty at younger ages — sometimes as young as 6 or 7. But in many schools, sex education classes don't begin before the fifth grade.
Cuneyt Hizal iStockphoto.com

For kids growing up in the San Francisco Bay Area, there's a standard introduction to puberty at many schools: an educational play called Nightmare on Puberty Street.

It's a fictional play, and in it, character Natalie raps about how quickly her body is growing — and how her classmates call her names.

"I didn't pick how my body would grow, and I don't feel normal, 'cause I'm not in control."

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