Science

5:29pm

Mon October 21, 2013
Shots - Health News

Scientists Grow New Hair In A Lab, But Don't Rush To Buy A Comb

Maybe someday Jerry won't be laughing at George's follicularly challenged scalp. But despite scientific advances there's still no cure for baldness.
NBC NBC via Getty Images

With a tiny clump of cells from a man's scalp, scientists have grown new human hair in the laboratory.

But don't get too excited. A magic cure for baldness isn't around the corner. The experimental approach is quite limited and years from reaching the clinic — for many reasons.

The scientists have grown the hair only on a tiny patch of human skin grafted onto the back of a mouse. And as wispy locks go, the strands are pretty pathetic. Some hairs were white, and some didn't even make their way out of the skin.

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5:18pm

Mon October 21, 2013
The Two-Way

Government Shutdown Delays Rocket Launch

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 10:36 am

A Minotaur I at Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.
NASA

The launch of a rocket carrying a record-breaking 29 satellites — originally set for early next month — will be delayed by a few weeks after the partial government shutdown halted preparations.

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3:38pm

Mon October 21, 2013
The Salt

Kansas Farmers Commit To Taking Less Water From The Ground

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 12:38 pm

The long arms of pivot irrigation rigs deliver water from the Ogallala Aquifer to circular fields of corn in northwestern Kansas.
Dan Charles NPR

If you've flown across Nebraska, Kansas or western Texas on a clear day, you've seen them: geometrically arranged circles of green and brown on the landscape, typically half a mile in diameter. They're the result of pivot irrigation, in which long pipes-on-wheels rotate slowly around a central point, spreading water across cornfields.

Yet most of those fields are doomed. The water that nourishes them eventually will run low.

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1:57pm

Mon October 21, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Scientist = Geek Is A Dangerous Equation

iStockphoto.com

Marcelo recently invited 13.7 readers to abandon nerdy stereotypes about scientists:

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9:46am

Mon October 21, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

Americans Fall Behind In The 'Getting Older' Race

Robert Krulwich NPR

As we all know, Americans are living longer. Women especially.

But here's what you may not know: French, German, Swedish, Italian, Japanese, British, Dutch and Canadian women are living longer too, but their lives are getting longer faster than ours. Take a look at this from the National Academy of Sciences.

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5:43pm

Sun October 20, 2013
Science

To Fix Climate Change, Scientists Turn To Hacking The Earth

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 2:52 pm

In the summer of 2012, a small group of the Haida people, a native community in Canada, had a problem. The salmon they rely on were disappearing. So the Haida took matters into their own hands.

They partnered with an American businessman, drew up plans and then took a boat full of iron dust into the waters off their home island and put the dust in the ocean.

When they spread the iron dust, it created a big algae bloom. They hoped the algae would soak up carbon dioxide and bring back the fish.

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5:39pm

Sun October 20, 2013
Books

For The Ultimate Getaway, Why Not South Sudan?

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 8:02 pm

Most people associate the Nile with Egypt, but the river also flows through South Sudan, where much of it is bordered by jungle. That makes it a excellent destination for rafting and wildlife enthusiasts, says travel guide author Max Lovell-Hoare.
Courtesy of Levison Wood/Secret Compass

With cooler temperatures approaching, you might be in the market for a perfect wintertime vacation. Maybe someplace sunny and warm, unspoiled by tourists, with beautiful views and rich culture.

To find all that, you might consider South Sudan. That's the suggestion from Sophie and Max Lovell-Hoare, authors of the Bradt Travel Guide to the young country.

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5:19pm

Sun October 20, 2013
Science

Climate Watcher Says He's Done With Flying

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 8:02 pm

Meteorologist Eric Holthaus has made his career monitoring the Earth's climate, and he's alarmed at what he sees. After reading a new, bleak international report on climate change, Holthaus has decided one important way to reduce his carbon footprint is to give up airplane travel for good.

5:06pm

Sun October 20, 2013
All Tech Considered

What's Creepy, Crawly And A Champion Of Neuroscience?

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 8:02 pm

The RoboRoach device allows users to influence the movements of cockroaches with a smartphone.
Backyard Brains

Soon you'll be able to direct the path of a cockroach with a smartphone and the swipe of your finger.

Greg Gage and his colleagues at Backyard Brains have developed a device called the RoboRoach that lets you control the path of an insect.

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6:44am

Sat October 19, 2013
Politics

'It Takes A Crisis': How '73 Embargo Fueled Change In U.S.

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 7:26 pm

Drivers and a man pushing a lawnmower line up at gas station in San Jose, Calif., in March 1974.
AP

Americans started thinking differently about U.S. dependence on imported oil 40 years ago this Sunday. Decades later, the U.S. is in the midst of a homegrown energy boom.

The oil embargo began in 1973. The United States had long taken cheap and plentiful oil for granted when Saudi Arabia shocked the country by suddenly cutting off all direct oil shipments in retaliation for U.S. support of Israel. Other Arab countries followed suit.

Prices soared. Gasoline lines stretched for blocks. Richard Nixon became the first of many U.S. presidents to call for energy independence.

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