Science

12:47pm

Fri October 25, 2013
Environment

Climate Change Aids Toxic Slime's Advance

Sewage and fertilizer runoff into China's Lake Taihu have fed a nasty bloom: an annual explosion of frothy cyanobacteria, which release neurotoxins into the lake. Hans Paerl, a marine and environmental scientist who studies Lake Taihu, says the warmer temperatures brought by climate change only contribute to the slime's advance.

12:46pm

Fri October 25, 2013
Mental Health

Uncovering the Brain of a Psychopath

What makes someone a psychopath? Can these traits be passed through family lines? Neuroscientist James Fallon, and author of The Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist's Personal Journey Into the Dark Side of the Brain, discusses his scientific and personal exploration into the antisocial mind.

12:46pm

Fri October 25, 2013
Science

The Real-Life Walking Dead

Cotard's syndrome, also known as Walking Corpse Syndrome, is a rare disorder that causes sufferers to believe they are dead. The exact cause is unknown. Doctors Thomas Linden and Andres Hellden describe effects of the syndrome that they observed in patients who took a common antiviral medication.

11:03am

Fri October 25, 2013
The Salt

Does Bacon Really Make Everything Better? Here's The Math

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 2:53 pm

According to big data, this bacon and avocado sandwich should be a party for your tastebuds.
iStockphoto

You'd have to be living under a rock to miss the signs of our cultural obsession with bacon.

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4:23pm

Thu October 24, 2013
Your Health

Want To Cut Calories? Try Snacking On Calorie-Dense Almonds

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 5:57 pm

A new study has found that people who snack on almonds really do eat less throughout the day. It's the combination of fiber, protein and the fact that we don't absorb all the calories we eat since we don't chew them very well. Another reason? They don't have carbs, which stimulate our appetites.

3:33pm

Thu October 24, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

A Life In Science: From Housewife To Amazon Trailblazer

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 3:44 pm

Aotus lemurinus, a type of owl monkey also referred to as the gray-bellied night monkey, seen here at the Santa Fe Zoo, in Medellin, Colombia.
Raul Arboleda AFP/Getty Images

It all started in 1968 at a pet shop called Fish 'N' Cheeps in New York's Greenwich Village. On the way to a Jimi Hendrix concert, Patricia Wright and her husband dashed into the shop to escape heavy rain. There, a two-pound ball of fur from the Amazon captured their attention. A few weeks and $40 later, this owl monkey became their pet; later on they acquired a female as well.

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10:00am

Thu October 24, 2013
The Salt

Report: Meat Producers Ignore Pleas For Health, Environmental Reform

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 10:41 am

Chickens in a mechanized hatchery in Monroe County, Ala.
Buyenlarge/Getty Images

Five years ago, a landmark report excoriated the animal agriculture industry's practices and laid out a road map for how it could do better. But in the years since, the problems are just as bad — and maybe even worse.

That's the conclusion of the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future. This week, the center scolded the industry again with a review of how it has fared in the years since the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production released its original report.

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6:01pm

Wed October 23, 2013
Environment

Delegates To Debate Watered-Down Plan For Antarctic Marine Preserve

Originally published on Wed October 23, 2013 7:57 pm

A lone emperor penguin makes his rounds, at the edge of an iceberg drift in the Antarctic's Ross Sea in 2006.
John Weller AP

Less than 1 percent of the world's oceans are set aside as protected areas, but diplomats meeting now in Australia could substantially increase that figure.

Delegates from 24 nations and the European Union have convened to consider proposals to create vast new marine protected areas around Antarctica.

This same group met over the summer and didn't reach consensus, so it's now considering a scaled-back proposal.

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6:01pm

Wed October 23, 2013
The Two-Way

Netflix On The Moon? Broadband Makes It To Deep Space

Originally published on Wed October 23, 2013 8:20 pm

NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer probe, seen in this artist's rendering, is orbiting the moon to gather detailed information about the lunar surface.
Dana Berry NASA

Here's a funny quirk of the modern age: It takes just seconds to pull up a bad sci-fi movie about invaders from the moon and watch it in HD. But actual communications between the Earth and moon are just as static-filled as they were back in the 1960s.

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3:20pm

Wed October 23, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Space Is Not Our Friend

Originally published on Wed October 23, 2013 4:22 pm

If Gravity carries a clear message, it is that the universe is hostile to life.
Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

This weekend I finally caught up with the rest of America's moviegoers and went to see Gravity, the blockbuster directed by Mexico's Alfonso Cuarón, of Harry Potter and Y Tu Mamá También fame. The movie stars Sandra Bullock as a Ph.D. medical engineer on her first space mission and George Clooney as an unflappable veteran astronaut. Somehow, Bullock, the medical engineer, is sent on a mission to fix the Hubble Space Telescope. (Huh?)

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