Science

12:26pm

Fri November 1, 2013
Environment

Hurricane Sandy Recovery, One Year Later

A year after Hurricane Sandy, recovery efforts are still ongoing, and questions remain about how to rebuild and prepare the coastlines for the next storm. A group of experts discusses rebuilding and protective options — from sea walls to "oyster-tecture" — and considers calls for a "managed retreat" from the shore.

9:34am

Fri November 1, 2013
TED Radio Hour

Success

Is success objective or subjective?
George Doyle thinkstock.com

"There is real danger of a disconnect between what's on your business card and who you are deep inside, and it's not a disconnect that the world is ready to be patient with." — Alain de Botton

Success has become synonymous with financial wealth, influence and status. But can we define success in another way — one that welcomes a broader range of accomplishment? It may not be as obvious as you think. In this hour, TED speakers share ideas for what makes us successful.

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9:34am

Fri November 1, 2013
TED Radio Hour

Can You Smile Your Way To Success?

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 9:15 am

James Duncan Davidson TED

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Success.

About Ron Gutman's TEDTalk

Smile! It just might make you a success. Ron Gutman says your smile can be a predictor of how long you'll live — and that a simple smile has a measurable effect on your overall well-being.

About Ron Gutman

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9:34am

Fri November 1, 2013
TED Radio Hour

Is Having Grit The Key To Success?

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 2:43 pm

Ryan Lash TED

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Success.

About Angela Duckworth's TEDTalk

Leaving a high-flying job in consulting, Angela Duckworth took a job teaching math to seventh-graders in a New York public school. She quickly realized that IQ wasn't the only thing separating the successful students from those who struggled. Here, she explains her theory of "grit" as a predictor of success.

About Angela Duckworth

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8:44am

Fri November 1, 2013
Shots - Health News

Seeing In The Pitch-Dark Is All In Your Head

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 10:13 am

I think I can see something.
iStockphoto.com

A few years ago, cognitive scientist Duje Tadin and his colleague Randolph Blake decided to test blindfolds for an experiment they were cooking up.

They wanted an industrial-strength blindfold to make sure volunteers for their work wouldn't be able to see a thing. "We basically got the best blindfold you can get." Tadin tells Shots. "It's made of black plastic, and it should block all light."

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8:01am

Fri November 1, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

Falling Into The Sky And Other Tales Of Gravity

Robert Krulwich NPR

For most of us, gravity is the tug that pulls us home.

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3:19am

Fri November 1, 2013
Animals

The Tail's The Tell: Dog Wags Can Mean Friend Or Foe

Originally published on Fri November 1, 2013 11:41 am

Friend Or Foe? Scientists say dogs react differently to the direction of another dog's tail wag.
Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Dogs can pick up emotional cues from another dog by watching the direction of its wagging tail, a new study suggests.

In a series of lab experiments, dogs got anxious when they saw an image of a dog wagging its tail to its left side. But when they saw a dog wagging its tail to its right side, they stayed relaxed.

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3:18am

Fri November 1, 2013
The Salt

Are Farm Veterinarians Pushing Too Many Antibiotics?

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 5:27 pm

Cattle crowd inside a feedlot operated by JBS Five Rivers Colorado Beef in Wiley, Colo.
John Moore Getty Images

In a barn outside Manhattan, Kan., researchers from Kansas State University are trying to solve the riddle of bovine respiratory disease. They're sticking plastic rods down the noses of 6-month old calves, collecting samples of bacteria.

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5:08pm

Thu October 31, 2013
The Salt

Heat, Drought Draw Farmers Back To Sorghum, The 'Camel Of Crops'

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 9:07 pm

A test field of sorghum outside Manhattan, Kan., planted by Kansas State University.
Dan Charles NPR

Much of the world is turning hotter and dryer these days, and it's opening new doors for a water-saving cereal that's been called "the camel of crops": sorghum. In an odd twist, this old-fashioned crop even seems to be catching on among consumers who are looking for "ancient grains" that have been relatively untouched by modern agriculture.

Sorghum isn't nearly as famous as the big three of global agriculture: corn, rice and wheat. But maybe it should be. It's a plant for tough times, and tough places.

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11:47am

Thu October 31, 2013
Shots - Health News

AIDS Scientists Encouraged By Antibodies That Hit Monkey Virus

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 3:15 pm

These HIV viruses even look a little like bull's-eyes.
A. Harrison and P. Feorino CDC

Scientists have a new idea for beating HIV: Target the virus with guided missiles called monoclonal antibodies.

At least in monkeys infected with an experimental virus similar to the human AIDS virus, the approach produced what researchers call "profound therapeutic efficacy."

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