Science

8:54am

Tue July 14, 2015
The Two-Way

NASA Zooms In On Pluto, For Closest Views Yet

Originally published on Tue July 14, 2015 9:50 pm

An image of Pluto that was taken by New Horizons shortly before its flyby Tuesday shows a heart-shaped pattern on the planet's surface. NASA says Pluto "sent a love note back to Earth."
NASA/Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

New images of Pluto have arrived from a NASA space probe, and they're already allowing scientists to update what we know about the dwarf planet — such as its size. NASA's New Horizons probe has traveled more than 3 billion miles to send photos and data about Pluto back to Earth.

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5:01am

Tue July 14, 2015
Space

Earth Gets A Close-Up View Of Its Most Distant Neighbors

Originally published on Tue July 14, 2015 11:25 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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5:01am

Tue July 14, 2015
Michel Martin, Going There

From Fishing With Mom To Becoming A Top Fisheries Official

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 9:47 am

Mamie Parker, a fish and wildlife biologist with a doctorate in ecology, remembers a janitor at work once telling her: "No African-American woman has been in here except to clean this office."
Emily Bogle NPR

Mamie Parker, a former assistant director of fisheries and habitat conservation at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, was the first African-American to head a regional office for that agency. But when she started out in the field, she says, she "did not see anyone that looked like me doing this type of work."

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3:49pm

Mon July 13, 2015
All Tech Considered

#RaceOnTech: How An Early Love Of Math Led Her To The Role Of CEO

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 10:03 am

Dr. Lisa Dyson is the CEO of Kiverdi, a next-generation sustainable oil company that converts CO2 and waste carbon gases into oils using biotechnology.
Maurice Dean Courtesy of Lisa Dyson

2:48pm

Mon July 13, 2015
The Two-Way

Planet Or Not, Icy Pluto To Finally Get Its Day In The Sun

Originally published on Mon July 13, 2015 8:30 pm

Technicians prepped the New Horizons spacecraft on Nov. 4, 2005, at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Fired into space in 2006, the probe is scheduled to finally get close to Pluto on Tuesday.
John Raoux AP

Alice Bowman oversees daily operations for NASA's mission to Pluto. Her language is peppered with technical terms — like "astronomical units" and "aim points."

But there's one piece of scientific nomenclature you won't hear coming from Bowman's lips: dwarf planet.

"Pluto is a planet," she says. "And that's the way I will always think of it."

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5:24am

Mon July 13, 2015
Research News

Now You See It, Some Day You Won't: Scientists Get Closer To Invisibility

Originally published on Wed July 15, 2015 11:21 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

I'm Renee Montagne and - David - David, are you there?

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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5:24am

Mon July 13, 2015
Shots - Health News

Should More Women Give Birth Outside The Hospital?

Originally published on Mon July 13, 2015 12:48 pm

Katherine Streeter for NPR

A recent recommendation from doctors in the United Kingdom raised eyebrows in the United States: The British National Health Service says healthy women with straightforward pregnancies are better off staying out of the hospital to deliver their babies.

That's heresy, obstetrician Dr. Neel Shah first thought. In the United States, 99 percent of babies are born in hospitals.

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8:11am

Sat July 11, 2015
Shots - Health News

Trying To Remember Multiple Things May Be The Best Way To Forget Them

Originally published on Mon July 13, 2015 2:35 pm

Leigh Wells Ikon Images/Getty Images

Our days are full of things to remember, and they don't always arrive in an orderly fashion. Perhaps you begin your commute home and remember that you need to pick up milk. But then immediately, another to-do springs to mind: You never called back your friend last week. You may try to hold both in your head, but in the end the milk, the phone call or both still sometimes fall away, forgotten.

A new scientific model of forgetting is taking shape, which suggests keeping multiple memories or tasks in mind simultaneously can actually erode them.

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7:45am

Sat July 11, 2015
Animals

For This Tarantula-Killing Wasp, Dinner's A Meal Best Served Living

Originally published on Sat July 11, 2015 10:38 am

Meal time for one species probably means sleepless nights for others.
Debbie Hall Flickr

It's been wet in Texas this year — exceptionally wet, as a matter of fact. With record amounts of rain, Texas is more than a little hot, green and rife with happy insects.

Take the tarantula hawk, for example. In case you've never heard of it, it's a wasp that's so big, and so nasty, that it attacks tarantulas — who happen to be quite big and nasty themselves.

So, what does a happy tarantula hawk look like? Ben Hutchins, an invertebrate biologist with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, takes NPR's Wade Goodwyn through all the gruesome wasp-on-tarantula details.

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7:45am

Sat July 11, 2015
Music

Classical Composers' Feathered Influences

Originally published on Sat July 11, 2015 10:38 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

Time now for some "Talkin' Birds."

(SOUNDBITE OF RADIO SHOW, "TALKIN' BIRDS")

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: It's a bird show. I like that. I love birds.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Ray Brown's Talkin' Birds.

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