Science

5:24am

Sun August 17, 2014
Science

The Machine That Tried To Scan The Brain — In 1882

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 12:13 pm

Angelo Mosso's "human circulation balance" machine worked like a seesaw to measure blood flow changes to the brain.
Sandrone et al., 2014, Brain

Everyone points to the Wright Brothers as the inventors of human flight. But centuries earlier, it was Leonardo da Vinci who imagined human flight, recognizing how birds used concepts like lift and wing shape to glide high above us.

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5:49pm

Sat August 16, 2014
Space

For City Dwellers, Stargazing Can Make For A Stellar Vacation

Dan Duriscoe works at a special computer-controlled camera used to photograph the night sky at Dantes View in Death Valley National Park in California.
John Locher AP

When was the last time you looked at the Milky Way? Or saw the shape of Cassiopeia? If you live in a city, you might not even remember. In the world's most populated areas, air and light pollution obscure the sight of thousands of stars once visible to the naked eye.

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8:05am

Sat August 16, 2014
Science

Making Scripts And Science Match

Originally published on Sat August 16, 2014 1:55 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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8:05am

Sat August 16, 2014
Science

Scientists Test The World's Seas On Ocean Sampling Day

Originally published on Sat August 16, 2014 1:55 pm

Copyright 2014 Georgia Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit http://www.gpb.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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3:37pm

Fri August 15, 2014
The Salt

Startups Pitch Cricket Flour As The Best Protein You Could Eat

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 12:56 pm

Exo's peanut butter-and-jelly bar contains about 40 ground-up crickets and has a familiar nutty, sweet flavor.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

If you heard crickets chirping in your backyard, would it occur to you to grind them into a powder to mix into a protein shake?

That could become the next foraging trend if several edible insect companies can convince consumers that pulverized crickets are the next "it" protein.

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1:55pm

Fri August 15, 2014
Shots - Health News

Has Health Law Helped Young People Get Mental Health Treatment? Maybe

Originally published on Fri August 15, 2014 3:22 pm

Ceneri/iStockphoto

Mental health issues like depression, anxiety and substance abuse often start in adolescence, then peak in young adulthood. But for young people who don't have steady jobs or stable paychecks, getting help can be tough.

A popular provision of the Affordable Care Act that took effect in 2010 aimed to make it easier for young adults to get access to health care, by allowing them to stay on their parents' insurance until they turn 26.

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7:03am

Fri August 15, 2014
Krulwich Wonders...

When Snails Lose Their Way

Originally published on Fri August 15, 2014 1:25 pm

Vi Hart YouTube

5:58pm

Thu August 14, 2014
Shots - Health News

A Virtual Outbreak Offers Hints Of Ebola's Future

Originally published on Thu August 14, 2014 8:07 pm

Kenyan health officials take the temperatures of passengers arriving at the Nairobi airport on Thursday. Kenya has no reported cases of Ebola, but it's a transportation hub and so is on alert.
Simon Maina AFP/Getty Images

While the Ebola outbreak continues to rage in West Africa, it is also unfolding — in a virtual sense — inside the computers of researchers who study the dynamics of epidemics.

Policymakers look to these simulations to get a sense of how the outbreak might spread. They also can use them to run experiments to see which public health measures should take priority.

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5:46pm

Thu August 14, 2014
Goats and Soda

How A Dissolvable 'Tampon' Could One Day Help Women Stop HIV

Originally published on Thu August 14, 2014 6:33 pm

Better than Egyptian cotton: This electrically spun fabric contains anti-HIV drugs and dissolves rapidly when it gets wet.
Courtesy of University of Washington

When it comes to protecting themselves from HIV, women need more options.

About 84 percent of all women diagnosed with HIV contract the virus through heterosexual sex. And right now, the female condom is the only contraception available that stops HIV — and is controlled by the woman. These devices can be hard to find and tough to use.

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2:49pm

Thu August 14, 2014
Science

A Scientist's Mission To Break The Itch-Scratch Cycle

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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