Science

7:33am

Tue March 25, 2014
The Salt

Can You Open A Bottle Of Wine With A Shoe? Yes, But It Ain't Pretty

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 5:31 pm

My attempt at opening a wine bottle with a tennis shoe.
Maggie Starbard/NPR

5:22am

Tue March 25, 2014
Asia

Can Mathematics Find Missing Malaysia Jetliner?

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 6:07 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The search for survivors on the missing Malaysian Airlines flight took a dark turn yesterday when Malaysia's prime minister said his government now believes the plane went down somewhere in the Indian Ocean and that all 239 people aboard are dead.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

They based that on a new assessment of signals sent from the aircraft to a satellite, but they can't tell exactly where the aircraft might have gone down.

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4:24pm

Mon March 24, 2014
Energy

A Dubious Birthday For The Exxon Valdez

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 2:59 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Here's a bit of what we learned when we woke up that morning, 25 years ago today.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

JEAN COCHRAN: A Coast Guard spokesman in Juneau, Alaska says an oil tanker has run aground in an ice field 20 miles off Valdez. That's the terminus of...

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4:24pm

Mon March 24, 2014
Environment

The Hearts Of Fish Still Bear Scars Of Oil Spilled Years Ago

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 6:46 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The spill in the Houston Ship Channel is another assault on one of the world's richest fishing grounds. The channel drains into the Gulf of Mexico and new research out today shows the Gulf's marine life is very vulnerable to the effects of oil. Much of what scientists have learned comes from studying the underwater leak of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig back in 2010. Here's NPR's Elizabeth Shogren.

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4:24pm

Mon March 24, 2014
News

Oil Spill Disrupts A Waterway Thick With Barges And Birds

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 6:46 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

I'm Robert Siegel.

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11:53am

Mon March 24, 2014
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

The Rotating Snakes Are All In Your Mind

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 3:03 pm

When the Rotating Snakes illusion is presented in grayscale, most people still perceive motion, but less than in the original color version.
Tania Lombrozo

Vision scientists are obsessed with illusions.

This isn't because illusions shatter the sense that we have direct access to the physical properties of the external world. And it isn't because illusions give us the feeling — itself a deception — that for one brief moment we've transcended appearance to understand things as they truly are.

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5:07am

Mon March 24, 2014
Around the Nation

25 Years After Spill, Alaska Town Struggles Back From 'Dead Zone'

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 12:25 pm

Orca Inlet, Cordova's fishing harbor, on a blustery day this month. Commercial fishing is the small Alaskan town's primary industry.
Marisa Peñaloza NPR

On March 24, 1989, the tanker Exxon Valdez struck a reef in Prince William Sound, Alaska, spilling 11 million gallons of crude oil into the pristine water. At the time, it was the single biggest spill in U.S. history. In a series of stories, NPR is examining the lasting social and economic impacts of the disaster, as well as the policy, regulation and scientific research that came out of it.

It's a blustery, snowy March day when Michelle Hahn O'Leary offers a tour of Cordova, Alaska, situated on the eastern shore of Prince William Sound.

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12:45pm

Sun March 23, 2014
Code Switch

The Most Powerful Nerd In The Universe Is A Scientific Anomaly

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 1:41 pm

Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson is remarkable, in part because he's a black astrophysicist — seemingly as elusive a phenomenon as the Higgs boson.
NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Neil deGrasse Tyson — astrophysicist, irreverent tweeter, vanquisher of Pluto, frequent Stephen Colbert foil — is America's "It" Nerd.

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7:41am

Sun March 23, 2014
Sports

New Test Improves Detection Of Performance-Enhancing Drugs

Originally published on Sun March 23, 2014 11:36 am

A group of scientists has developed a doping test 1,000 times more sensitive than those currently used. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with lead researcher Daniel Armstrong about how the test works.

2:03pm

Sat March 22, 2014
Science

Why The Exxon Valdez Spill Was A Eureka Moment For Science

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 11:36 am

An oiled murre passes the darkened shoreline near Prince William Sound, Alaska, less than a month after the March 1989 spill.
Erik Hill Anchorage Daily News/MCT/Landov

On March 24, 1989, the tanker Exxon Valdez struck a reef in Prince William Sound, Alaska, spilling 11 million gallons of crude oil into the pristine water. At the time, it was the single biggest spill in U.S. history. In a series of stories, NPR is examining the lasting social and economic impacts of the disaster, as well as the policy, regulation and scientific research that came out of it.

Twenty-five years of research following the Exxon Valdez disaster has led to some startling conclusions about the persistent effects of spilled oil.

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