Science

11:34am

Fri November 15, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

How To Love A Fake

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 5:36 pm

Museum director Alex Rueger (L) and Dutch artist Jeroen Krabbe stand in front of Vincent van Gogh's long-lost Sunset at Montmajour at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. The 1888 landscape painting from the height of the Dutch master's career had been abandoned for years in a Norwegian attic on the belief that it was a forgery.
Lex van Lieshout AFP/Getty Images

Art has been in the news a lot lately.

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9:20am

Fri November 15, 2013
TED Radio Hour

How Can Deserts Turn Into Grasslands?

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 3:06 pm

James Duncan Davidson TED

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Misconceptions.

About Allan Savory's TEDTalk

About two-thirds of the world's grasslands have turned into desert. Allan Savory has devoted his life to stopping it. He now believes that a surprising factor can protect grasslands and even reclaim degraded land that was once desert.

About Allan Savory

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9:20am

Fri November 15, 2013
TED Radio Hour

Are We Happier When We Have More Options?

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 3:06 pm

Robert Leslie TED

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Misconceptions.

About Barry Schwartz's TEDTalk

Psychologist Barry Schwartz takes aim at a central tenet of western societies: freedom of choice. In Schwartz's estimation, choice has made us not freer but more paralyzed, not happier but more dissatisfied.

About Barry Schwartz

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3:04am

Fri November 15, 2013
Environment

A Rancher And A Conservationist Forge An Unlikely Alliance

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 9:08 pm

Trout fishing is big business in Montana, bringing in tens of millions of dollars annually.
Tom Murphy Getty Images/National Geographic

Trout fishing is a magnet that draws people from around the world to places like Ovando, Mont. Just ask the owner of Blackfoot Angler and Supplies, Kathy Schoendoerfer.

"Every state in the nation has been through this little shop in Ovando, Montana, population 50," says Schoendoerfer with a mix of pride and perhaps a little fatigue. "And we've also had everybody from Russia, Latvia. We get a lot of Canadians, France, Finland, Brazil, Scotland, Germany, South Africa. We get a lot of business out here. You know, fly-fishing is huge."

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5:59pm

Thu November 14, 2013
The Salt

What's The Most Important Thing Food Labels Should Tell Us?

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 7:29 pm

Illustration by Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Food labels have become battlegrounds. Just last week, voters in Washington state narrowly defeated a measure that would have required food manufacturers to reveal whether their products contain genetically modified ingredients.

Supporters of the initiative — and similar proposals in other states — say that consumers have a right to know what they're eating.

But there are lots of things we might want to know about our food. So what belongs on the label?

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4:57pm

Thu November 14, 2013
All Tech Considered

Electric Cars Drive Demand For Cheaper, More Powerful Batteries

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 7:29 pm

A prototype of a flexible battery from Imprint Energy, one of 40 companies working on battery technology in the San Francisco Bay Area.
Imprint Energy

If there's one person you'd expect to have an electric car, it's Venkat Srinivasan. He's in charge of battery research at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California.

"I'm actually in the market for a new car and would love to buy an electric car," he says. "But there are practical problems."

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3:59pm

Thu November 14, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

New Study Shows Brain Benefits Of Bilingualism

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 3:18 pm

Telugu Talli poses for the camera during a celebration in Hyderabad, home to a study that seems to show the onset of dementia is delayed for people who speak more than one language." href="/post/new-study-shows-brain-benefits-bilingualism" class="noexit lightbox">
An Indian schoolgirl dressed as Telugu Talli poses for the camera during a celebration in Hyderabad, home to a study that seems to show the onset of dementia is delayed for people who speak more than one language.
Noah Seelam AFP/Getty Images

The largest study so far to ask whether speaking two languages might delay the onset of dementia symptoms in bilingual patients as compared to monolingual patients has reported a robust result. Bilingual patients suffer dementia onset an average of 4.5 years later than those who speak only a single language.

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2:44pm

Thu November 14, 2013
Shots - Health News

Bacterial Competition In Lab Shows Evolution Never Stops

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 10:49 am

The plate on the left contains about equal numbers of colonies of two different bacteria. After the bacteria compete and evolve, the lighter ones have taken the lead in the plate on the right.
Courtesy of Michael Wiser

Evolution is relentless process that seems to keep going and going, even when creatures live in a stable, unchanging world.

That's the latest surprise from a unique experiment that's been underway for more than a quarter-century.

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2:35pm

Thu November 14, 2013
Animals

Old Dogs, New Data: Canines May Have Been Domesticated In Europe

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 8:34 pm

A dog burial in Greene County, Ill. This fossil dates back to about 8,500 years ago.
Courtesy of Del Baston, Center for American Archaeology

Scientists have used some new tricks and old dogs to show that thousands of years ago, wolves may have first become man's best friend in Europe.

Researchers extracted DNA from ancient wolf or dog fossils and compared it with DNA from modern dog breeds and wolves. Until recently, labs didn't have the kind of genetic tools they'd need to work with such old dog DNA and do this kind of detailed comparison.

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2:33pm

Thu November 14, 2013
The Two-Way

Tennessee Valley Authority To Close Several Coal-Fired Plants

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 4:47 pm

An air-monitoring station near the TVA Kingston Fossil Plant in Kingston, Tenn. Stations such as this one are used to monitor clean-air compliance of TVA coal-fired plants.
Wade Payne AP

The Tennessee Valley Authority, the nation's largest public utility, has decided to close six coal-fired power plants in Alabama and replace two others in Kentucky with a single new natural gas station.

CEO Bill Johnson made the announcement at a Thursday board meeting in Oxford, Miss., citing stricter environmental regulations and flat demand for power.

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