Science

2:25pm

Mon December 2, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

The Truth About The Left Brain / Right Brain Relationship

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 3:38 pm

It's time to rethink whatever you thought you knew about how the right and left hemispheres of the brain work together.
iStockphoto

Sometimes ideas that originate in science seep out into the broader culture and take on a life of their own. It's still common to hear people referred to as "anal," a Freudian idea that no longer has much currency in contemporary psychology. Ideas like black holes and quantum leaps play a metaphorical role that's only loosely tethered to their original scientific meanings.

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1:14pm

Mon December 2, 2013
The Two-Way

Comet ISON Is No More, NASA Says

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 6:02 pm

NASA took a series of images to create this "timelapse" view of comet ISON's trip around the sun.
NASA

Comet ISON, a "shining green candle in the solar wind," is no longer with us, NASA declared Monday morning in a tribute to what many hoped would be the "comet of the century."

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1:04pm

Mon December 2, 2013
The Salt

I'm Not Just Gaming, Ma! I'm Helping The World's Farmers

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 3:05 pm

Cropland Capture's developers hope players will find where crops are grown amid Earth's natural vegetation in satellite images to shine a light on where humanity grows its food.
Courtesy of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

There's no easy way to track all of the world's crops. What's missing, among other things, is an accurate map showing where they are.

But the people behind Geo-Wiki are hoping to fix that, with a game called Cropland Capture. They're turning people like you and me into data gatherers, or citizen scientists, to help identify cropland.

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8:24am

Sun December 1, 2013
Humans

Why You Can't Tickle Yourself

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 2:25 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, let's talk about something deeply philosophical - tickling. More specifically, why you can tickle someone else but you can't tickle yourself.

JAKOB HOHWY: It's a very basic kind of phenomenon that every child knows.

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5:21am

Sun December 1, 2013
Animals

Saving The Native Prairie — One Black-Footed Ferret At A Time

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 2:25 pm

Biologist Travis Livieri checks a briefly sedated ferret's health status inside an improvised trailer clinic.
Elizabeth Shogren NPR

American pioneers saw the endless stretches of grassland of the Great Plains as a place to produce grain and beef for a growing country. But one casualty was the native prairie ecosystem and animals that thrived only there.

Some biologists are trying to save the prairies and they've picked a hero to help them: the black-footed ferret. In trying to save this long skinny predator with a raccoon-like mask, the biologists believe they have a chance to right a wrong that nearly wiped a species off the planet.

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5:08pm

Sat November 30, 2013
Science

Putting A Price On 'Dueling Dinosaur' Fossils

What would you pay for a fossil of two complete dinosaurs locked in what seems to be a fight to the death? An auction house put that question to the test with the dinosaurs, discovered in 2006 in the Hell Creek formation of Montana. It got an unexpected answer.

7:33am

Sat November 30, 2013

5:40am

Sat November 30, 2013
The Salt

These Cookbook Photos Redefine What Fresh Seafood Looks Like

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 11:05 am

How to make dead fish look attractive? That's the challenge New York-based duo Shimon and Tammar Rothstein faced when they were hired to do the photography for famed French chef Eric Ripert's book On the Line.
Photos by Shimon and Tammar, Courtesy of Shimon and Tammar

How to make dead fish look attractive? That's the challenge New York-based duo Shimon and Tammar Rothstein faced when they were hired to do the photography for famed French chef Eric Ripert's book On the Line.

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5:39am

Sat November 30, 2013
Around the Nation

From Lab To Lectern, Scientists Learn To Turn On the Charm

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 6:15 pm

About 20 scientists are clustered in a cramped conference room in San Diego, one of the country's science hubs, but they aren't there to pore over their latest research. Instead, this is a meeting of BioToasters — a chapter of the public speaking organization Toastmasters, geared specifically toward scientists.

"For a typical scientist, they will spend a lot of time at the bench, so they're doing a lot of maybe calculations or lab work where they're not interacting directly from person to person," says BioToasters President Zackary Prag, a lab equipment sales rep.

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5:37am

Sat November 30, 2013
Environment

Tech Leaders, Economists Split Over Clean Energy's Prospects

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 1:17 pm

Andres Quiroz, an installer for Stellar Solar, carries a solar panel during installation at a home in Encinitas, Calif.
Sam Hodgson Bloomberg via Getty Images

There is a broad scientific consensus that to keep global warming in check, we need to phase out 80 percent of all oil, coal and natural gas by midcentury. President Obama has set a nonbinding target to do precisely that.

There are technologists who say this national goal is well within reach, but there are also economists who are quite pessimistic about those prospects. And you can find this range of opinion on the University of California, Berkeley campus.

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