Science

9:38am

Wed April 29, 2015
Shots - Health News

Why The Urologist Is Usually A Man, But Maybe Not For Long

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 11:48 am

If you need to see a urologist, the odds are very good that your doctor will be a man. Only about 8 percent of the practicing urologists are female, according to a poll from WebMD that includes gender distribution among medical specialties.

The fact that there are few female urologists might not seem shocking – urologists spend a lot of time looking at penises. But they also treat a wide variety of urinary tract and kidney health problems in both men and women.

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3:55am

Wed April 29, 2015
Shots - Health News

Florida's House Quits Early, At Impasse Over Medicaid Expansion

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 2:22 pm

Florida state Senate president Andy Gardiner, R-Orlando, was applauded by his fellow senators Tuesday, after expressing his disappointment with the Florida House for ending its session three days early, instead of working through the budget clash.
Steve Cannon AP

The Republican-controlled Florida legislature — at odds over the question of whether to expand Medicaid — abruptly ended its session three days early on Tuesday, leaving hundreds of bills that are unrelated to health care unfinished.

Andy Gardiner, president of Florida's state Senate, says he's disappointed with the House's decision to stop negotiating and leave town.

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11:56am

Tue April 28, 2015
The Salt

How Newbie Gardeners Can Safely Grow Food On Urban Land

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 12:09 pm

Graze the Roof is a community-produced garden that grows vegetables on the rooftop of a church in San Francisco.
Sergio Ruiz/Flickr

A version of this story was first published on April 5, 2014. It has been updated.

The majority of Americans now live in cities and have very little to do with the production of their food.

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11:03am

Tue April 28, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Why Video Games Matter

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 11:21 am

The Last of Us is a video game that breaks the traditional narrative form of storytelling in games.
Naughty Dog

Human beings are storytellers. This basic, constant instinct is evident throughout history — from creation narratives told around the night's fire to Greek playwrights to the first novels to the flickering images of early motion pictures.

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5:41am

Tue April 28, 2015
Science

Geologists Warned That Huge Quake Could Strike The Himalayas

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 8:09 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

5:35pm

Mon April 27, 2015
The Two-Way

Big Aftershocks In Nepal Could Persist For Years

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 6:20 pm

A man stands near collapsed houses in Bhaktapur, on the outskirts of Kathmandu, on April 27, two days after a magnitude-7.8 earthquake hit Nepal. Aftershocks tend to get less frequent with time, scientists say, but not necessarily gentler.
Prakash Mathema AFP/Getty Images

Aftershocks following Saturday's magnitude-7.8 quake in Nepal are jangling nerves and complicating rescue operations. So far, there have been more than a dozen quakes of magnitude 5 or higher, and another two dozen between magnitude 4.5 and 5.

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5:23am

Mon April 27, 2015
Shots - Health News

Maybe You Should Rethink That Daily Aspirin

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 1:48 pm

For all the good aspirin can do in preventing second heart attacks and strokes, taking it daily can boost some risks, too — of ulcers, for example, and of bleeding in the brain or gut.
iStockphoto

We've all heard that an aspirin a day can keep heart disease at bay. But lots of Americans seem to be taking it as a preventive measure, when many probably shouldn't.

In a recent national survey, more than half the adults who were middle age or older reported taking an aspirin regularly to prevent a heart attack or stroke. The Food and Drug Administration only recommends the drug for people wh have already experienced such an event or are at extremely high risk.

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3:36am

Mon April 27, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

The Danger Of GMOs: Is It All In Your Mind?

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 6:28 am

iStockphoto

Why do so many people oppose genetically modified organisms, or GMOs?

According to a new paper forthcoming in the journal Trends in Plant Science, it's because opposition to GMOs taps into deep cognitive biases. These biases conspire to make arguments against GMOs intuitive and compelling, whether or not they're backed by strong evidence.

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5:27pm

Sat April 25, 2015
World

Solving Crimes With Pollen, One Grain Of Evidence At A Time

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 6:23 pm

Dallas Mildenhall, New Zealand's forensic pollen expert, peers at samples through a microscope.
Courtesy of David Wolman

Some murder cases are harder to solve than others. The investigation into the killing of Mellory Manning — a 27-year-old woman who was assaulted and murdered in 2008 while working as a prostitute in Christchurch, New Zealand — confounded police.

They conducted an investigation and interviewed hundreds of people, but months later, they still had no solid leads.

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7:59am

Sat April 25, 2015
Joe's Big Idea

Hubble's Other Telescope And The Day It Rocked Our World

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 12:36 pm

The Hooker 100-inch reflecting telescope at the Mount Wilson Observatory, just outside Los Angeles. Edwin Hubble's chair, on an elevating platform, is visible at left. A view from this scope first told Hubble our galaxy isn't the only one.
Courtesy of The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science Collection at the Huntington Library, San Marino, Calif.

The Hubble Space Telescope this week celebrates 25 years in Earth's orbit. In that time the telescope has studied distant galaxies, star nurseries, planets in our solar system and planets orbiting other stars.

But, even with all that, you could argue that the astronomer for whom the telescope is named made even more important discoveries — with far less sophisticated equipment.

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