Politics

10:02am

Fri September 7, 2012
'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup

It's All Politics, Sept. 6, 2012

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 10:42 am

Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images
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The Republicans and the Democrats have had their say. The bad news: NPR's Ron Elving and Ken Rudin now have to have their say. This week's episode of the "It's All Politics" podcast reviews both conventions, the highs and the lows, and what if anything it all means for November.

Join Rudin and Elving for the latest political news in this week's roundup.

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8:20am

Fri September 7, 2012
It's All Politics

Republicans Or Democrats: The Choice Comes Down To Competing Myths

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 9:15 am

What does your vision of America look like?
Loud Red Creative iStockphoto.com

Early in his acceptance speech last night, President Obama laid out the voters' task in these words:

"On every issue, the choice you face won't be just between two candidates or two parties. It will be a choice ... between two fundamentally different visions for the future."

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7:24am

Fri September 7, 2012
It's All Politics

Fact Checkers Ding Obama And Biden For Some Spinning

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 9:52 am

Vice President Biden and President Obama wave to the delegates Thursday night at the conclusion of the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

"We heard some facts being spun" Thursday night when President Obama and Vice President Biden gave their acceptance speeches at the Democratic National Convention, report the watchdogs at FactCheck.org.

They and other independent fact checkers have compiled, just as they did at last week's Republican National Convention, a list of those things said by the two parties' standard bearers that don't quite add up or may give misleading impressions.

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7:03am

Fri September 7, 2012
It's All Politics

With Big Parties Over, It's Back To Small-Population Swing States

President Obama's campaign bus is parked in Missouri Valley, Iowa, on Aug. 13. On Friday, Obama was scheduled to return to the swing state for more campaigning.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

On the heels of the quadrennial political extravaganzas, it's back to the day-to-day work of winning the election. On Friday, that means the focus returns to a pair of small-population states with relatively few electoral votes.

The day after he formally accepted his party's nomination, President Obama and an entourage including first lady Michelle Obama and Vice President Biden were scheduled to campaign in Portsmouth, N.H., and at the University of Iowa in Iowa City.

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6:48am

Fri September 7, 2012
It's All Politics

Retell Politics: Story About Obama's Mother Gets Another Look

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 7:50 am

Were last night's convention references to Barack Obama's mother and her struggles with an insurance company before her death a powerful argument for health care reform? Or were they a well-worn misrepresentation of history?

The answer appears to be in the wording.

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4:46am

Fri September 7, 2012
Election 2012

Obama Wants 4 More Years To Fix Nation's Problems

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 10:15 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

As he accepted his party's nomination for a second term last night, President Obama said that building a better future will take him more time.

MONTAGNE: The president told his supporters at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte that the progress he'd made so far would be reversed if Mitt Romney won the White House.

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4:39am

Fri September 7, 2012
Politics

Next President Will Still Have To Work With Congress

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 10:15 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Throughout this program we've been hearing parts of President Obama's speech. The people watching that speech in Charlotte last night included Ramesh Ponnuru. He writes for National Review and for Bloomberg. And in a column this week he predicted that if President Obama should win reelection the next four years will look a lot like the past two.

Welcome back to the program, Mr. Ponnuru.

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4:39am

Fri September 7, 2012
Election 2012

Thousands Of Shut-Outs Watch Obama Speech On TV

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 10:15 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Speaking to the Democratic Convention last night, President Obama spoke a line that played off a famous speech by John F. Kennedy. Kennedy said people should ask what they can do for their country.

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4:39am

Fri September 7, 2012
Politics

Close Read: Examining Obama's Acceptance Speech

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 10:15 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP. HOST: And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Let's take a close read now of some of the lines from President Obama's convention speech last night.

MONTAGNE: We're checking meanings behind some of those phrases, as we did with Mitt Romney's speech one week ago. Three NPR correspondents will help us out.

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12:44am

Fri September 7, 2012
It's All Politics

Obama: 'Times Have Changed ... So Have I'

President Obama speaks Thursday at the Democratic National Convention.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Framing the coming election as a choice between fundamentally different visions, President Obama offered himself to the country Thursday as a fire-tested leader ready to finish the job he started.

"Our problems can be solved," Obama said. "Our challenges can be met."

It was an older, battle-scarred nominee who faced his party in Charlotte, N.C. This message of hope was tempered and longer-view — a good distance if not a full turn from the vision he offered four years ago when he accepted the nomination in a thundering Denver stadium.

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