Politics

2:55pm

Fri January 18, 2013
It's All Politics

Speechwriters: After Bland First Inaugural, Obama Faces Tougher Second

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 5:09 pm

President Obama gives his first inaugural address on Jan. 20, 2009.
Ron Edmonds AP

A presidential inauguration is an event defined by huge, sweeping optics: the National Mall full of cheering Americans; a grandiose platform in front of the Capitol building; the parade down Pennsylvania Avenue. And the centerpiece: a speech.

On Monday, President Obama will give his second inaugural address — and he faces a challenge in crafting a speech for this moment.

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2:22pm

Fri January 18, 2013
The Two-Way

Republicans Offer Three-Month Increase In Debt Ceiling

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 3:34 pm

As workers prepare the Capitol for Monday's inaugural ceremony, there's word that Congress might not get into another battle over the debt ceiling.
Kevin Dietsch UPI /Landov

In a move that could head off another bruising battle over increasing the nation's debt ceiling, GOP leaders in the House plan to approve a three-month increase in the nation's borrowing authority next week, NPR's S.V. Date reports.

But, he tells our Newscast Desk, Republicans want to tie a longer-term increase to the passage of a budget that cuts spending.

His report continues:

"The plan comes from Majority Leader Eric Cantor as House Republicans wrap up a retreat in Southern Virginia.

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12:59pm

Fri January 18, 2013
It's All Politics

Inauguration Mashup: The Speech In 11 Easy Steps

Originally published on Sat January 19, 2013 6:29 am

An 11-step guide to the perfect inauguration speech
NPR

May the eagles of democracy soar above the covenant that binds our great nation in an era of new beginning ... or something.

Have you ever watched an inaugural address and wondered: How DO those guys (because they're always guys) do it? Well, we've prepared this handy guide so you, too, can give a speech like the chief executive.

Our instructions are based on a century of recorded footage. William McKinley's address was the first to be recorded by a "motion picture camera" (in 1897). Calvin Coolidge was the first to be broadcast over the radio (in 1925).

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10:25am

Fri January 18, 2013
It's All Politics

Key Player In '94 Assault Weapons Ban: 'It's Going To Be Much More Difficult' Now

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 8:36 am

President Clinton speaks to a member of the House on Aug. 11, 1994, lobbying for votes for the crime bill.
Marcy Nighswander AP

President Obama's proposed renewal of a ban on assault-style weapons is expected to be based on the legislation approved by Congress in 1994 that expired 10 years later.

But when the first assault weapons ban was approved — outlawing 19 specific weapons — it was a very different time, and Congress was a very different place.

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9:00am

Fri January 18, 2013
'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup

It's All Politics, Jan. 17, 2013

Zhang Jun Xinhua /Landov
  • Listen to the Roundup

President Obama lays down his marker on guns and exhorts Congress to act. But the House has no intention of voting to ban assault weapons, and rural Democrats in the Senate remain skittish. Meanwhile, Chuck Hagel gets some important backers in his bid to join the cabinet, and Mark Sanford hopes all is forgiven as he tries to return to Congress. But if he deserves a second chance, then so do NPR's Ken Rudin and Ron Elving.

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6:55am

Fri January 18, 2013
Politics

Does Obama's Second-Term Agenda Need Beefing Up?

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. President Obama is set to take the oath of office for a second time. He has promised an ambitious agenda for the next four years. NPR's Mara Liasson tackles the question of whether it's ambitious enough.

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3:32am

Fri January 18, 2013
It's All Politics

Latino Voters Urge Obama To Keep Immigration Promise

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 9:35 am

Latino voters were a key to President Obama's victory in November, turning out in big numbers and supporting Obama by more than 2 to 1 over Republican Mitt Romney.

Now, many of those voters say it's time for Obama to do something he did not do in his first term: push hard for and sign a comprehensive immigration overhaul.

Let's start with a group of Latinos — young and old, some U.S. citizens, some not — heading from Florida to Washington, D.C., for Obama's inauguration and for meetings with members of Congress. As caravans go, it's a small one: 13 people in two vans.

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5:56pm

Thu January 17, 2013
It's All Politics

Some House Republicans Deny Risk Of Default In Debt Ceiling Debate

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 6:10 pm

Republican Rep. Tim Huelskamp, shown in June 2012, says the U.S. won't default unless the president chooses to let it happen.
John Hanna AP

The federal government hit its debt limit at the end of last year. Since then, the Treasury Department has been taking what it calls "extraordinary measures" to keep the government funded and avoid defaulting on U.S. obligations.

But those measures will run out sometime between the middle of February and early March. Then it's up to Congress to raise the debt limit.

House Republicans are wrestling with the best strategy at a retreat Thursday and Friday in Virginia. And some have been denying that there is a risk of default if the debt ceiling isn't raised.

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4:57pm

Thu January 17, 2013
Politics

Conflict Still Plagues Washington On Obama's Second Inauguration

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 6:10 pm

President Obama begins his second term much the way he ended his first — locked in a fiscal fight with congressional Republicans. But the president's argument that the November election would break the logjam hasn't panned out just yet.

4:57pm

Thu January 17, 2013
Politics

House Republican Retreat Focuses On Strategies For Rebuilding

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 6:10 pm

House Republicans have left Washington, D.C., and reconvened three hours south, just outside Williamsburg, Va., for a closed-door retreat. They've heard from pollsters about why the public doesn't like them. Now they'll hear from consultants about how to woo women and minorities. David Welna talks to Audie Cornish.

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