Politics

6:38am

Fri April 4, 2014
National Security

Senate Committee Votes To Declassify CIA Interrogations Report

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 8:22 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The Senate intelligence committee voted yesterday in favor of declassifying a huge report that's been kept under wraps for nearly a year and a half. It's the so-called torture report on the interrogation and secret detention program carried out by the CIA following the 9/11 attacks. NPR's David Welna reports.

DAVID WELNA, BYLINE: Only a 450-page summary of the report and its 20 findings would actually be declassified. New Mexico Democratic Senator Martin Heinrich predicts a big impact.

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5:10am

Fri April 4, 2014
Business

Did A Federal Safety Agency Help General Motors Avoid A Recall?

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 8:22 am

As details emerge about GM's handling of an ignition switch recall, a question is raised again: What is the relationship between regulators and the regulated, and the revolving door between the two?

5:46pm

Thu April 3, 2014
Politics

For Political Conventions, Another Balloon Bursts

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:34 pm

President Obama stands on stage with Vice President Biden and their families after accepting the party nomination during the final day of the 2012 Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C.
Alex Wong Getty Images

There's news today about the 2016 presidential campaign that has nothing to do with the growing list of would-be candidates with White House aspirations.

It's about the big nominating conventions the Democrats and Republicans hold every four years. Legislation the president signed Thursday afternoon means those huge political extravaganzas will no longer receive millions of dollars in taxpayer support. It's not the only change that's likely for conventions.

Let's start with a little time travel:

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5:00pm

Thu April 3, 2014
It's All Politics

Who's Who In Senate-CIA Report Showdown

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 5:27 pm

Senate Intelligence Committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., speaks after a closed-door meeting Thursday on Capitol Hill. The panel voted to approve declassifying part of a report on Bush-era interrogations of terrorism suspects.
Molly Riley AP

The world could soon get its first official look at the CIA's post-Sept. 11 interrogation and detention activities now that the Senate Intelligence Committee has voted to make public a blockbuster report about the agency's secret program.

The Senate panel's move to declassify key parts of the 6,300-page document comes just weeks after a rancorous battle erupted between the committee's Democratic chairwoman, Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, and the CIA over allegations the agency spied on members through their computers.

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4:43pm

Thu April 3, 2014
Politics

Mega-Donor Opens Wallet On The Hill To Kill Online Gambling

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:34 pm

Sheldon Adelson listens as New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie speaks during the Republican Jewish Coalition meeting on March 29 in Las Vegas. Several possible GOP presidential candidates gathered in Las Vegas as Adelson, a billionaire casino magnate, looks for a new favorite to help on the 2016 race for the White House.
Julie Jacobson AP

Now that the Supreme Court has eliminated the cap on the total amount one individual can give to candidates in each election, many are wondering how the very rich will respond.

If they spread their money across a wider swath of lawmakers, would that improve their chances of passing the legislation they want?

Casino magnate Sheldon Adelson could be the first test case.

Expanding One's Reach Across Congress

Adelson is pushing a bill through Congress that would ban online gambling, and he has pledged he will spend "whatever it takes."

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4:38pm

Thu April 3, 2014
All Tech Considered

A Week Into His New Job, Controversy Forces Mozilla CEO To Resign

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 8:22 am

Mozilla co-founder Brendan Eich in 2010.
Drew McLellan Flickr

Brendan Eich, embattled co-founder of Mozilla and creator of the JavaScript programming language, has stepped down from his new role as CEO of Mozilla, the nonprofit foundation and tech company behind the Firefox browser.

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3:55pm

Thu April 3, 2014
It's All Politics

NPR Poll: GOP's Older Voter Advantage Slips From 4 Years Ago

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 5:04 pm

A strong majority of young voters support the Affordable Care Act, according to a new NPR poll. In March 2014, models handed out juice shots to encourage individuals — and especially young people — to sign up for health insurance.
Brennan Linsley AP

The new NPR poll had good news for Republicans and Democrats. As NPR correspondent Mara Liasson reported for Morning Edition, likely voters were nearly split evenly between support and opposition to the Affordable Care Act, with 51 percent against and 47 percent for.

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11:15am

Thu April 3, 2014
The Salt

'Hot' Oregon Blueberry Fight Prompts Farm Bill Changes

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 3:42 pm

It's unclear exactly how the new law will change enforcement of wage and hour laws on farms. Meanwhile, a blueberry labor dispute in Oregon grinds on in federal court.
David Wright/Flickr

American consumers are becoming increasingly concerned about the working conditions of the people who pick, pack and harvest their food. And retailers are responding. Wal-Mart is now paying Florida farm workers more for each pound of tomatoes picked. Whole Foods is using worker wages to rank the sustainability of the produce and flowers it sells.

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7:07am

Thu April 3, 2014
Politics

In Ann Arbor, Obama Gathers Support For Minimum Wage Hike

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:53 am

The Senate could vote on a minimum wage bill as soon as next week. But it is hard to imagine the Republican-controlled House will take it up.

6:17am

Thu April 3, 2014
Politics

Democrats: Benghazi Probes Are Wasteful, Politically Motivated

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:53 am

Citing millions of dollars spent already, Democrats argue politics is not a good reason to spend millions more investigating the attack on the U.S. diplomatic outpost in Libya more than a year ago.

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