Politics

6:25pm

Mon August 26, 2013
It's All Politics

For Obama, Outrage Over Syria Is The Easy Part

A young girl receives treatment at a makeshift hospital in Damascus, Syria, after a suspected chemical weapons attack by the military.
AP

The present Syrian crisis ranks among the most vexing moments of President Obama's presidency.

The recent heart-rending images of Syrian civilians, many of them young children apparently killed by chemical weapons used by the government of Bashar Assad, have raised the volume on calls for the president to act.

But while there's a clarity to the outrage itself, for Obama things quickly get murky.

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5:48pm

Mon August 26, 2013
The March On Washington At 50

Sleepy, Southern And Segregated: What D.C. Was Like In '63

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 5:30 pm

Charter bus passengers look for their transportation home after the March on Washington of Aug. 28, 1963.
AP

Fifty years ago this week, when hundreds of thousands of demonstrators came from across the country to take part in the 1963 March on Washington, the city was not yet the cosmopolitan capital that it arguably is today.

But it was a mecca for African-Americans, says historian Marya McQuirter.

"Washington was definitely a different city 50 years ago," she says, "for a number of reasons. By 1957, it had become the largest majority black city in the country."

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12:23pm

Mon August 26, 2013
The Two-Way

Rodeo Clown 'Would Be Honored' To Shake Obama's Hand

Rodeo clown Tuffy Gessling in his first on-camera interview about the "Obama mask" incident, with Kansas City's KCTV.
KCTV

"I didn't do this to do any hating on anyone. I did this to be funny. I did it to be a joke," says Tuffy Gessling, the rodeo clown behind a skit at the Missouri State Fair earlier this month that sparked outrage when a masked "President Obama" was chased by a bull that Gessling said was "gonna getcha, getcha, getcha, getcha!"

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11:54am

Mon August 26, 2013
Politics

Brazile & Steele: Keeping The Dream Alive

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 1:54 pm

Crowds make their way toward the Lincoln Memorial.
Amy Ta NPR

The nation is marking the 50th anniversary of the historic March on Washington this week. Tens of thousands traced the path of civil rights leaders and foot soldiers in the nation's capital this weekend. On Wednesday, President Obama will speak from the Lincoln Memorial, just as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and other speakers did back in 1963. Tell Me More reflects on the role political activism played and is continuing to play in the civil rights movement.

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3:43am

Mon August 26, 2013
It's All Politics

In Arkansas, The Senate Battle Is Already Brutal

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 5:03 am

Sen. Mark Pryor, D-Ark., speaks at the Rice Expo in Stuttgart, Ark., on Aug. 2.
Danny Johnston AP

5:16am

Sun August 25, 2013
It's All Politics

A Guide To The Nation's Most Vulnerable Governors

Gov. Tom Corbett addresses a joint session of the Pennsylvania House and Senate on Feb. 5 in Harrisburg.
Matt Rourke AP

If you're looking for the most interesting gubernatorial races to watch in the coming year, the nation's biggest states are a good place to start.

Democrats Jerry Brown and Andrew Cuomo look like safe bets for re-election in California and New York, respectively. And, despite the pending retirement of Rick Perry, Republicans are confident of maintaining their hold on the governor's mansion in Texas.

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5:07pm

Sat August 24, 2013
Race

50 Years Later, A March On Washington Among Generations

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 3:55 pm

Demonstrators on Saturday in Washington, D.C., commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.
Kevin Lamarque Reuters/Landov

They came by the beat of drums: grandparents with their grandchildren, community organizers and activists, church members and college students.

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9:18am

Sat August 24, 2013
The Two-Way

Thousands Gather In D.C. To Mark 1963 Civil Rights March

Originally published on Sat August 24, 2013 3:13 pm

People hold signs as they gather to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

(This post last updated at 2:20 p.m. ET)

Tens of thousands of people assembled on the National Mall to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s 1963 March on Washington, best known as the venue for the iconic "I Have a Dream" speech that helped galvanize the civil rights movement.

Organizers, including the Rev. Al Sharpton and King's son, Martin Luther King III, had hoped to attract 100,000 people to attend Saturday's events leading up the official Aug. 28 anniversary.

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7:35am

Sat August 24, 2013
Digital Life

Trading Domain Names For A Day With The Candidates

Originally published on Sat August 24, 2013 11:39 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Last month, Kentucky Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes declared she'll run against minority leader, Mitch McConnell for the U.S. Senate.

ALISON LUNDERGAN GRIMES: ...Kentucky by running for the U.S. Senate.

(APPLAUSE)

SIMON: Her candidacy had been rumored for months. The obvious Web domain name, Grimesforsenate.com, had already been purchased. But not by the Grimes' campaign. By a man who's a kind of political hobbyist.

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5:31am

Sat August 24, 2013
Law

Cutting Public Defenders Can Cost Federal Government More

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 1:32 pm

Courts in Tucson, Ariz., are turning to private lawyers to represent clients who would have had public defenders.
Chris Morrison AP

These days, the Federal Public Defender's Office in Tucson, Ariz., has lots of space. Since the federal budget cuts known as sequestration began, the office has lost a quarter of its staff to layoffs or furloughs.

Under the Constitution, clients still need legal representation, so judges have to appoint private attorneys to replace the public defenders.

The sequester was supposed to save money. But in this case, the sequester is costing federal dollars.

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