Politics

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Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Political Scientists Find A Guinea Pig: Montana

Oct 28, 2014

Political scientists looking to test their hypotheses about voting behavior found a ready pool of test subjects this election: Montanans.

A hundred-thousand registered voters received a "voter guide" rating four nonpartisan state Supreme Court candidates by their liberal or conservative ideology. Voters were urged: "Take this to the polls."

Only in the fine print was this disclosure: "This guide was created as part of a joint research project at Stanford and Dartmouth."

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And now another story of big, political money coming to small-town America. In Cole County, Missouri, a circuit court judge is fighting to stay on the bench. Her challenger was underfunded until he got some outside help. NPR's Peter Overby reports.

Unofficial results Monday night showed the next mayor of Toronto would be John Tory, who topped fellow Progressive Conservative Doug Ford in a race that was upended earlier this year when Ford's scandal-ridden brother, incumbent mayor Rob Ford, left the race after being diagnosed with cancer.

After that announcement, Doug Ford stepped up to run for mayor in his brother's place, while Rob Ford ran for his brother's council seat. He kept that council seat on Monday night, winning 59 percent of the vote for the position his family has held since the ward was created in 2000.

Navajo Nation Changes Language Law

Oct 27, 2014

In the space of a few months, the quest for one candidate to become the next Navajo Nation president has become intertwined with the changing culture of Indian Country. It has turned into what could be described as a political thriller with a distinctly Navajo hue.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

At The Greater Piney Grove Baptist Church in Atlanta, about 700 congregants jam the pews every Sunday morning at 10:30. The church is near the edge of DeKalb County, and it's helping lead a "Souls to the Polls" drive.

Georgia Democrat Michelle Nunn is running an extremely tight race for Senate against Republican David Perdue, and the difference between victory and defeat could ride on the African-American vote. The push is on to get voters to turn out early — especially at black churches.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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