Politics

6:57am

Wed October 23, 2013
The Two-Way

Fired White House Aide Admits He Was Twitter Troll

Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images
  • From the NPR Newscast: Giles Snyder reports

A top White House national security aide who was secretly going on Twitter to insult other Obama administration officials and politicians from both major parties, and to question the policies he had been helping develop, is apologizing.

Jofi Joseph is also out of a job.

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3:12am

Wed October 23, 2013
Around the Nation

It's City Vs. Creditors In Detroit Bankruptcy Trial

Originally published on Wed October 23, 2013 12:46 pm

Detroit officially makes its case for bankruptcy before a federal judge on Wednesday. The city is currently saddled with $18 billion in long-term debt, and officials see bankruptcy as their only choice.
Paul Sancya AP

In Detroit on Wednesday, a federal trial begins that will determine whether that city is eligible for the nation's largest-ever municipal bankruptcy.

Hundreds of the city's creditors are lining up to oppose the bankruptcy, arguing that Detroit is violating Michigan's Constitution and that if officials tried harder they could find enough savings to pay the city's bills.

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7:30pm

Tue October 22, 2013
It's All Politics

For Democrats, Obamacare Web Woes Create 2014 Headache

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 8:11 pm

Glitches in the HealthCare.gov website, shown here, are making the White House and its allies very nervous.
Uncredited AP

President Obama radiated confidence when he took to the Rose Garden earlier this week to convince Americans that the flaws in the Affordable Care Act website would be fixed.

It's understandable that the president himself might be upbeat about the prospects of resolving the problems currently plaguing the technology behind the law.

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4:53pm

Tue October 22, 2013
It's All Politics

Public Support For Marijuana Legalization Hits Record High

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 8:50 pm

An ATM sits next to a rack of marijuana clone plants that are used to grow medical marijuana on Wednesday at The Joint, a medical marijuana cooperative in Seattle. Last week Washington became the second U.S. state to adopt rules for the recreational sale of marijuana.
Ted S. Warren AP

A record number of Americans are in favor of legalizing marijuana, according to a new Gallup poll released Tuesday.

The poll, which was conducted Oct. 3-6, reports that 58 percent of the public supports the legalization of marijuana, while 39 percent opposes it.

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3:49pm

Tue October 22, 2013
Economy

Job Growth Was Disappointing, But Some See Reasons For Hope

Hans Kahl (left) speaks with prospective employees at a job fair for veterans, in Miami on Tuesday. With job growth still slow, the Federal Reserve may keep trying to stimulate the economy.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

When it finally came out Tuesday, the September jobs report — delayed for 18 days by the government shutdown — showed a labor market moving forward. But the pace was slow enough to prompt many economists to view it as a letdown.

Job growth "is disappointing, given that employment is still down by about 1.8 million from its peak prior to the recession," Gus Faucher, senior economist with PNC Financial Services Group, said in his analysis.

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12:35pm

Tue October 22, 2013
Politics

Bipartisan Group Slowed Down By Shutdown?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up in this program, states and cities across the country are facing major budget problems and so some leaders there are saying it's time to slash public pensions. We'll talk about that in just a few minutes.

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9:44am

Tue October 22, 2013
Code Switch

The Racial History Of The 'Grandfather Clause'

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 4:44 pm

This editorial cartoon from a January 1879 edition of Harper's Weekly pokes fun at the use of literacy tests for blacks as voting qualifications.
Wikimedia Commons

People aren't exempted from new regulations because they're old and crotchety, even if that's what it sounds like when we say they're "grandfathered in."

The term "grandfathered" has become part of the language. It's an easy way to describe individuals or companies who get to keep operating under an existing set of expectations when new rules are put in place.

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9:03am

Tue October 22, 2013
It's All Politics

Tuesday Morning Political Mix: The GOP's Very Bad Poll Day

Good morning.

President Obama just had a very bad, no good, awful day trying to explain what went so terribly wrong with his administration's health care sign-up website, and Republicans had a field day.

Today, it's Republicans who will be having just such a day.

Three major national polls show, unequivocally, that Republicans are taking the brunt of the public's anger after this month's government shut down and default crisis.

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3:15am

Tue October 22, 2013
Law

Getting Federal Benefits To Gay Couples: It's Complicated

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 9:54 am

A gay rights activist waves a rainbow flag in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in June, a day before the ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

It has been four months since the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a law that defined marriage as between a man and a woman. The ruling paved the way for thousands of same-sex married couples to receive federal benefits, and a special group of government lawyers has been working to make that happen.

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3:14am

Tue October 22, 2013
Shots - Health News

How Politics Set The Stage For The Obamacare Website Meltdown

Originally published on Wed October 23, 2013 12:23 pm

It all seemed so easy then. Back in June, the Supreme Court declared the Affordable Care Act constitutional. Waiting for that decision may have cost the administration precious time.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Since the Affordable Care Act's health care exchanges launched to a long series of error messages Oct. 1, most of the "what went wrong" fingers have been pointing at software developers.

But some say there's more to it than that — that politics has played a role as well.

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