Politics

Political news

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Two hundred six thousand Virginians will newly have the right to vote this year. That's according to the office of Virginia Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe, who signed a bill on Friday that would allow felons who had completed their sentences to vote.

President Obama, in London to meet with the British prime minister, joked that he "warmed up" for those meetings this morning playing Prince's "Purple Rain" and "Delirious."

Obama has long been a fan of the musician, who died yesterday at the age of 57.

The president said he is staying at the U.S. ambassador's residence and "it so happens our ambassador has a turntable, and so this morning we played 'Purple Rain' and 'Delirious' just to get warmed up before we left the house for important bilateral meetings like this."

This week, the NPR Politics team discusses Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton's big wins in the New York primary and looks ahead to next Tuesday, when five states hold primaries and more than 500 delegates are at stake.

Also on the podcast, a rant from Elizabeth Warren about Ted Cruz and whether or not 1,237 really is the magic number for winning the Republican nomination.

On the podcast:

  • White House Correspondent Tamara Keith
  • Campaign Reporter Sam Sanders

The Republican National Committee delegates and the three presidential campaigns jockeying for their votes huddled here in Hollywood, Fla., for its last formal party meeting ahead of the July convention in Cleveland.

While Donald Trump's convincing New York primary win boosts his chances at winning the nomination outright, the potential for an open, contested convention lingers.

Donald Trump's enduring appeal in the Republican presidential contest has the GOP in a quandary, as it's forced to contend with voters fed up with party politics.

Some 50 years ago, another vociferous candidate put the scare in traditional power brokers. George Wallace fired up crowds with a similar anti-establishment message, and drew protests as passionate as are being seen at Trump's rallies today. Wallace also became a face of racial tension in America as the leading symbol for segregation in the 1960s.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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