Jazz

Jazz guitarist John Scofield has had a pretty remarkable career. Without even finishing music school, he found himself on the Carnegie Hall stage playing with jazz legends Chet Baker and Gerry Mulligan. Then it was on to Miles Davis, his own successful jazz-funk fusion groups, and even greater exposure playing with jam bands.

Art Hodes On Piano Jazz

Dec 24, 2015

Jazz pianist Art Hodes (1904–1993) was born in Ukraine and moved to the U.S. with his family as a baby. While he got his start as a musician in Chicago, his big break came when he moved to New York in 1938 and played with Joe Marsala and Mezz Mezzrow. He later returned to Chicago, where he remained active as a performer, educator and writer. On this 1984 episode of Piano Jazz, Hodes performs "St. Louis Blues" and "Someone To Watch Over Me."

Originally broadcast in the fall of 1984.

Set List

God Is In The House: Five Sacred-Jazz Recordings

Dec 23, 2015

The 2015 NPR Music Jazz Critics Poll

Dec 21, 2015

NPR Music is pleased to present the results of a poll where 147 jazz critics selected their favorite recordings of 2015.

For 10 consecutive years, this poll has been a labor of love by eminent critic Francis Davis. It's grown tremendously since he initially submitted the consensus of 30 writers to The Village Voice in 2006. Over the last month, print journalists, bloggers and broadcasters nominated more than 700 different albums. We're thrilled to host his exhaustive project on our site.

Only it wasn't a tie, exactly. I abhor ties more than nature does a vacuum. Ties are unlikely, if not impossible, in the poll's upper echelons. The rules are cleverly designed to circumvent them. See those parenthetical figures next to the point totals?

1 (tie). Rudresh Mahanthappa, Bird Calls (ACT). 350 (53)

1. (tie). Maria Schneider, The Thompson Fields (ArtistShare). 350 (49)

To ring in the holiday season, Jazz Night in America spends the hour with the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra as it performs highlights from its extensive holiday songbook.

Ruby Braff On Piano Jazz

Dec 18, 2015

Trumpeter and cornetist Ruby Braff (1927–2003) drew his style from the influences of Louis Armstrong and Bix Beiderbecke. Throughout the 1950s Braff was in demand in New York as a Dixieland and swing player, and went on to form a quartet with guitarist George Barnes and other small groups.

When Jon Anderson, the singer from British progressive rock band Yes, and electric-jazz-violin innovator Jean-Luc Ponty play together, their collaboration makes immediate sense. Anderson calls it spiritual. The Anderson Ponty Band combines music from both of them — Anderson has written words to Ponty's instrumentals — and it soars.

On this page, hear performances from an October concert, as well as a conversation with the two longtime players.

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