Business

6:08am

Tue April 1, 2014
Business

It's Illegal But People Get Fired For Talking About Their Pay

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 8:23 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

The U.S. Senate today will debate why women still earn roughly 80 cents to a man's dollar. Equal pay is a goal of the Paycheck Fairness Act. As NPR's Jennifer Ludden reports, one part of the bill would ban workplace policies that keep everyone's pay secret.

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5:58am

Tue April 1, 2014
Business

Why Burning Wood To Stay Warm Is Back In Vogue

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 8:23 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

People in the nation's capital looked up on Sunday to see horizontal snow on the 30th of March. Weekend snow also turned up in Connecticut, Maine and Pennsylvania, and some other places. It was one more reminder of a brutal and long winter, which for some, was also a painfully expensive winter to heat their homes. Record numbers of people have turned to an old-style and cheaper alternative: Wood.

Here's Rhode Island Public Radio's Kristin Gourlay.

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3:19am

Tue April 1, 2014
All Tech Considered

This Tax Season, Fraudsters May Target Your Refund

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 9:47 am

Fraudsters can get a lot of data by hacking payroll systems.
iStockphoto

You've already heard about thieves stealing credit card numbers, with the Target stores theft dominating the news headlines. But imagine what a thief could do with your company's payroll records. Those contain valuable information such as your Social Security number, date of birth, your address and how much you earn.

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3:08am

Tue April 1, 2014
Business

An Intern At 40-Something, And 'Paid In Hugs'

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 11:43 am

Danielle Probst, 50, works part-time in food service at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C. Previously, she worked in film and marketing and also had an internship at a social media marketing company.
Jim Tuttle NPR

As the job market improves and people are trying to get back to work, more older workers in their 40s and 50s are signing on for internships. It could pay off, but it can come with some difficult trade-offs.

For Renee Killian, 47, it has meant working an unpaid stint alongside fellow interns who are less than half her age. Killian's dayside duties at the Red Cross in Washington, D.C., often involve making sure the response trucks are properly stocked with blankets, water bottles and cleaning kits. At night, she is a volunteer on call. And she's not earning a dime.

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3:05am

Tue April 1, 2014
Code Switch

Lending Circles Help Latinas Pay Bills And Invest

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 8:50 am

Alicia Villanueva gives change to a customer at Off the Grid, a weekly street-food market in San Francisco.
Sarah Peet Sarah Peet Photography

As part of its Changing Lives of Women series, Morning Edition is exploring women and their relationship with money: saving, purchasing and investing for themselves and their families.

Cuban-American Barb Mayo describes a tanda like this: "It's like a no-interest loan with your friends." Mayo had never heard of tandas growing up, and it wasn't until she started working in sales for a cable company in Southern California that she was introduced to the concept.

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6:57pm

Mon March 31, 2014
All Tech Considered

The New Mozilla CEO's Political Past Is Imperiling His Present

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 10:25 am

Mozilla's new CEO, Brendan Eich, pictured in 2009.
Casey Dunn Flickr

For the Internet community, the principles of free speech and equal rights are foundational. But in recent days, those issues are clashing at Mozilla, the nonprofit foundation and tech company behind the Firefox browser.

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5:46pm

Mon March 31, 2014
Business

The Long Road To GM's Ignition Switch Recall

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 12:08 pm

Chevy Cobalts on the assembly line in Ohio in 2008. Documents show General Motors was aware of problems with the car's ignition switch years before, but failed to act.
Ron Schwane AP

The new head of General Motors, Mary Barra, goes to Capitol Hill Tuesday to begin two days of testimony.

It's the first time she'll be questioned about a safety defect that's been linked to at least 13 deaths and has sparked a 2.6 million-vehicle recall.

At issue for the Detroit CEO is a classic question: What did GM know about the problems with ignition switch problems in its cars, and when did the company know it?

And just as important for GM and government regulators is the follow-up question: Why did no one act sooner?

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5:36pm

Mon March 31, 2014
Shots - Health News

British Drugmaker Funds Research On Chronic Disease In Africa

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 3:31 pm

Andrew Witty, CEO of GlaxoSmithKline, says that better control of infectious diseases in Africa is allowing chronic diseases to come to the surface.
Mark Lennihan AP

One of the world's largest drugmakers says it will invest more than $200 million in Africa over the next five years in a push for better treatment of noncommunicable diseases there.

GlaxoSmithKline said the funding would be focused on sub-Saharan Africa, where the company already employs about 1,500 people and operates three factories. The money would go toward building five more factories and funding of research and development focused on the region.

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4:33pm

Mon March 31, 2014
Business

Timeline: A History Of GM's Ignition Switch Defect

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 9:31 am

Consulting materials engineer Mark Hood shows the ignition assembly that has a faulty ignition switch (black piece at left), in the mechanical testing laboratory at McSwain Engineering Inc. in Pensacola, Fla. The firm helped to conduct the engineering investigations and failure analysis that resulted in the GM recall.
Michael Spooneybarger Reuters/Landov

In February, General Motors issued sweeping recalls for several models suspected of having a faulty switch that automatically turns the car's engine off and prevents air bags from deploying — while the car is in motion. More than 2.6 million cars have been recalled so far.

At the core of the problem is a part in the vehicle's ignition switch that is 1.6 millimeters less "springy" than it should be. Because this part produces weaker tension, ignition keys in the cars may turn off the engine if shaken just the right way.

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2:37pm

Mon March 31, 2014
The Two-Way

Feds Will Require Rearview Cameras On Vehicles In 2018

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 3:39 pm

The 2009 Ford Flex vehicle showing the rear-camera view.
Andy Cross Denver Post via Getty Images

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration will require all new vehicles — from small subcompacts to commercial vans — to have "rear visibility technology" beginning in May 2018.

The new rule essentially mandates that all vehicles be equipped with a rearview camera.

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