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Cars In America: Is The Love Story Over?

Aug 18, 2013

Almost as soon as they started rolling off the assembly lines, automobiles became synonymous with freedom. And in the post-World War II boom our relationship with cars intensified.

It was about horsepower, status, being American, and for young people: rebellion. For generations cars inspired countless songs, books and movies. But now there are signs that our car culture is losing some of its shine.

The Securities and Exchange Commission has launched an investigation of JPMorgan Chase's operations in China, reportedly looking into whether the investment bank hired the children of high-ranking Chinese government officials in an effort to secure business.

The Wall Street Journal quotes from an SEC filing that says U.S. regulators are investigating "business relationships with certain clients."

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Last week, the Justice Department put the breaks on a deal that could create the world's largest airline. The government has blocked a proposed merger between American Airlines and US Airways with a lawsuit. The action elicited some surprise because the airline industry has had a major run of mergers in recent years.

In the digital world, almost everything you do to communicate leaves a trace. Often, emails are stored on servers even after they're deleted. Phone calls create logs detailing which numbers connected, when and for how long. Your mobile phone can create a record of where you are.

If you're a journalist trying to protect a confidential source, this is a very difficult world to work in.

The race to create a viable Internet-based TV service is on, and the contestants include the biggest names in computer technology: Apple, Microsoft, Intel and Google. Sony has apparently reached a deal — as preliminary — with Viacom to carry the company's cable channels on its planned web TV service.

Audie Cornish talks with Alan Levin, a Bloomberg News reporter covering aviation safety and the Federal Aviation Administration, about cargo plane safety and why cargo plane accidents appear to be increasing worldwide

Congress has gone home for its annual August recess, so Tell Me More takes a look at headlines in places across the country. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with Mike Leary from the San Antonio Express-News and Dana Coffield of The Denver Post.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with an EPA crackdown.

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GREENE: Ford Motor Company will reduce the fuel economy sticker on its new C-Max hybrid to 43 miles per gallon, down from its earlier estimate of 47.

As Michigan Radio's Tracy Samilton reports, the change has generated a new review of fuel economy testing standards.

'Headless' Headline Writer Gets The Ax

Aug 16, 2013

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's go to our last word in business now, which is: Headless Headline Writer Gets The Ax.

The stock market has lost about 3.5 percent of its value since the beginning of the month. For insight into why the decline, David Greene talks to David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal.

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