Business

5:43am

Thu November 8, 2012
Business

Business News

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 9:00 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a whole bunch of insurance plans.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: Maybe also some auto industry stimulus here. As many as a quarter million cars and trucks damaged when Sandy stormed up the East Coast will have to be scrapped. That's according to the National Automobile Dealers Association. The estimate is less than the 325,000 cars ruined by Hurricane Katrina, but it's still an awful lot of cars.

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5:43am

Thu November 8, 2012
Europe

Greeks In Store For More Austerity Cuts

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 5:31 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And during the presidential campaign, Greece and its crushing debt often came up as a cautionary tale, as in don't let America become another Greece.

That country has now approved yet another round of deep budget cuts to avoid bankruptcy, which in turn prompted another round of protests, as Joanna Kakissis reports.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

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3:30am

Thu November 8, 2012
Shots - Health News

Hospitals Gamble On Urgent Care Clinics To Keep Patients Healthy

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 4:51 pm

Dr. Wanda Simmons-Clemmons examines Dawn Antonelli at the PromptCare urgent care clinic.
Jenny Gold for NPR

When Stephen Wheeler realized he had an aching, swollen finger, he called his primary care doctor, who works for MedStar Health. The doctor referred him to PromptCare, an urgent care clinic in a strip mall in the Baltimore suburbs.

Wheeler says he probably would have ended up waiting a long time if he'd gone to the doctor. And even longer at the emergency room.

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3:29am

Thu November 8, 2012
The Salt

Americans Rediscover The Kick Of Hard Cider

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 4:52 pm

A growing number of U.S. consumers are finding much to enjoy in this fruity alcoholic beverage, driving an increase in cider sales. The Vermont Hard Cider Company now produces 70,000 cases of Woodchuck Hard Cider each week.
Ben Sarle Vermont Hard Cider Company

A couple hundred years ago. hard apple cider used to be the drink of choice for thirsty Americans. It was easy to make and easy to find. But as people moved into cities, and beer became more popular, cider fell out of fashion.

Now it's come roaring back. U.S. hard cider sales are up 65 percent over last year, and just about all the big beer companies sell it, as well as many artisan brewers. Finding cider at your local bar is often no longer a problem.

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3:26am

Thu November 8, 2012
U.S.

Opening Lines Set For A Deal To Avoid Fiscal Cliff

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 4:50 pm

Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, said Wednesday that House Republicans are willing to accept new revenues "under the right conditions."
J. Scott Applewhite AP

With the election over, attention in Washington has turned to the nation's debt and deficit challenges — most immediately the looming fiscal cliff. That's the $600 billion worth of expiring tax breaks and automatic spending cuts set to start taking effect Jan. 1.

The president and Congress agreed to those automatic measures to force themselves to find a more palatable compromise to rein in deficits. On Wednesday, there was an attempt to jump-start that process.

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3:25am

Thu November 8, 2012
Shots - Health News

Obamacare Is Here To Stay, But In What Form?

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 10:46 am

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper signs a bill in June 2011 to pave the way for a health insurance exchange in the state.
Ed Andrieski AP

President Obama's re-election and the retention of a Democratic majority in the Senate means the likelihood of a repeal of the Affordable Care Act has receded.

So what now?

"The law is here and we should at this point expect it to still be here Jan. 1, 2014," says Alan Weil, executive director of the nonpartisan National Academy for State Health Policy.

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5:50pm

Wed November 7, 2012
U.S.

Frustrated Long Island Braces For New Power Outages

Originally published on Wed November 7, 2012 8:49 pm

Patty Manfredonia, president of a volunteer ambulance company in Sayville, N.Y., has been collecting blankets for Long Island residents without power. A new storm Wednesday is already causing new outages.
Steve Henn NPR

Normally, the nor'easter bearing down on the Northeast on Wednesday wouldn't be a tremendous cause for concern. But the storm, delivering snow, sleet and wind gusts of up to 60 miles per hour, is expected to hit parts of Long Island and New Jersey still reeling from Hurricane Sandy.

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5:02pm

Wed November 7, 2012
Shots - Health News

New Pill For Rheumatoid Arthritis Gets FDA Nod

A bottle like this one containing Xeljanz, a new arthritis drug from Pfizer, would cost more than $2,000 wholesale.
Pfizer

In the Election Day scramble you might have missed that Pfizer got a new drug approved for rheumatoid arthritis.

Pfizer expects the twice-a-day pill called Xeljanz will be available in pharmacies later this month.

The drug won't come cheap. The wholesale price will run about $2,000 for a month's supply, the company says.

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2:15pm

Wed November 7, 2012
Planet Money

Ask A Banker: High Frequency Trading

Originally published on Sun November 11, 2012 1:58 pm

Not just an empty suit.
Paul Goyette Flickr

Hi! I'm back. I was once a banker and now I write for Dealbreaker and answer your questions about the financial world here. You can send questions to planetmoney@npr.org with "ask a banker" in the subject line, or ask on Twitter (@planetmoney).

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1:37pm

Wed November 7, 2012
The Salt

Meet 4 African Women Who Are Changing The Face Of Coffee

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 3:39 pm

Fatima Aziz Faraji is one of four women who is at the forefront of empowering women in the coffee sector.
Karen Castillo Farfán NPR

If you're a coffee drinker, chances are the cup of java you drank this morning was made from beans that were produced or harvested by women. Women's handprints can be found at every point in coffee production.

In fact, on family-owned coffee farms in Africa, about 70 percent of maintenance and harvesting work is done by women, according to an analysis by the International Trade Centre, but only rarely do women own the land or have financial control.

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