Business

12:36pm

Tue November 13, 2012
Your Money

How The Alternative Minimum Tax Could Slam You

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 1:29 pm

Customers line up at an H&R Block office in Nashville, Tenn., on April 17, the deadline for filing 2011 federal income taxes.
Mark Humphrey AP

Seriously, again?

Anyone who follows the adventures of the alternative minimum tax has to be getting sick of the many sequels. Again and again, this unpopular income tax threatens to hit middle-class families with large and unexpected tax increases.

And each time the threat reappears, Congress applies a "patch" to fix the problem temporarily. That makes the threat an annual event — along with the associated congressional hand-wringing and taxpayer confusion.

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12:11pm

Tue November 13, 2012
The Two-Way

Motor Trend Names Tesla S Car Of The Year, First Electric Car To Receive Honor

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 12:40 pm

Model S Alpha, in black, and the Telsa Roadster behind it.
James Lipman Telsa

Motor Trend named Tesla's Model S as its Car of the Year. It is the first time in the award's 64-year history the honor goes to a car without an internal combustion engine.

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11:06am

Tue November 13, 2012
Your Money

Alternative Minimum Tax And Your Bottom Line

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 1:31 pm

If the government goes over the "fiscal cliff," millions of households could see tax increases because of an obscure part of the tax code, known as the alternative minimum tax. Host Michel Martin talks with NPR Business Editor Marilyn Geewax about exactly what could happen and who would be affected.

5:08am

Tue November 13, 2012
Business

New York's Art District Devastated By Sandy

There are nearly 400 art galleries in New York's Chelsea neighborhood. Many of these galleries were flooded by the storm surge that accompanied Hurricane Sandy. One insurance company estimates it has $40 million in claims.

5:02am

Tue November 13, 2012
Business

Business News

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 6:30 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a small reprieve for Greece.

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5:02am

Tue November 13, 2012
Business

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 6:48 am

Men have always outnumbered women on America's roads, but that's no longer the case. According to the University of Michigan's Transportation Research Institute, the switchover happened in 2010.

3:46am

Tue November 13, 2012
The Salt

Danes May Bring Back Butter As Government Rolls Back Fat Tax

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 3:34 pm

Toothbutter, illustrated.
Sidsel Overgaard NPR

Toothbutter: noun. Butter spread so thickly as to reveal teeth marks upon biting.

The fact that this word exists in the Danish language should help to explain what politicians were up against when they introduced the "fat tax" just over a year ago. This is a country that loves it some butter (and meat, and all things dreadful to the arteries).

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3:33am

Tue November 13, 2012
Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond

Beach Towns Mourn Sandy-Ravaged Boardwalks

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 1:15 pm

Waves break Oct. 31 in front of a destroyed amusement park wrecked by Hurricane Sandy in Seaside Heights, N.J.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Hurricane Sandy left a long trail of destruction across the New Jersey shoreline. And it did a lot more than just flood houses.

In towns like Seaside Heights and Belmar, Sandy wiped out the boardwalks that line the beach. In places like these, boardwalks served as the commercial center knitting the towns together, and residents are wondering where to go from here.

Until two weeks ago, the boardwalk was the place to hang out in Belmar, N.J. Ann Summer was walking along the water with her husband this weekend.

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4:36pm

Mon November 12, 2012
Technology

Supercomputers Act Like Talent Magnets

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 5:47 pm

Titan, the new supercomputer at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, has been crowned the fastest in the world. It can clock 17.59 petaflops (quadrillions of calculations per second). Audie Cornish talks to Steve Henn for more.

4:28pm

Mon November 12, 2012
The Salt

Kind of Like 'eFarmony': Matching Farmers With Urban Landowners For Fun And Profit

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 6:15 pm

Chris Costa and one of her chickens on her farm in Downingtown, Pa. Costa and her partner, T.J., found the land for this farm through a sustainable agriculture program.
Emma Lee WHYY

Many farmers want their farms to be located close to a city - especially organic farmers who'd like to sell their produce at big urban farmers markets. But the price of land within range of a big city is sky high and only getting higher.

Most small farmers buy their land, but some are now looking to lease in suburban or exurban areas. And to do that, they're using something straight out of Fiddler On The Roof: A matchmaker.

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