Business

4:55am

Fri December 7, 2012
Around the Nation

Michigan Likely To Become A Right-To-Work State

Originally published on Fri December 7, 2012 5:42 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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4:55am

Fri December 7, 2012
Business

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Fri December 7, 2012 7:08 am

Ever wonder why you have to turn off your e-reader or tablet before a plane takes off and lands? The Hill newspaper obtained a letter written by the head of the Federal Communications Commission to the Federal Aviation Administration. Julius Genachowski has asked for the FAA to loosen the rules on those devices.

4:55am

Fri December 7, 2012
Around the Nation

Amtrak's Empire Builder Line

Originally published on Fri December 7, 2012 6:41 am

Oil development in North Dakota and Montana has caused ridership to increase dramatically on the only Amtrak line running through those states. Nationally, the railroad company costs the federal government more than $400 million every year, so rail enthusiasts thought the oil boom might turn around the losing rail proposition in certain regions. But the Empire Builder Line is still not making money.

2:54am

Fri December 7, 2012
Planet Money

Why The Falling Birthrate Is Bad News For My 2-Year-Old Son

Originally published on Fri December 7, 2012 7:26 am

Please don't make me pay for your retirement.
Alex Blumberg NPR

The U.S. birthrate just fell to its lowest point since we've been keeping track. Here's why that may be a problem for my 2-year-old son.

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2:50am

Fri December 7, 2012
The Salt

In Farmers Market, A Free Market Rises In Cuba

Originally published on Fri December 7, 2012 8:30 pm

Cuba has relaxed some business rules, allowing street vendors to sell produce and a large wholesale produce market to open at night on the edge of Havana.
Greg Kahn Getty Images

Cuba has no shortage of fertile farmland, but the country spends $1.5 billion a year importing about 70 percent of its food.

The communist government's chronic struggle to get farmers to produce more is forcing authorities to grudgingly accept a greater role for market principles and the profit motive.

Now authorities seem willing to go another step further, tolerating the rise of what might be described as Cuba's "free-est" market.

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6:40pm

Thu December 6, 2012
The Salt

U.S. Olive Oil Makers Say Imports Aren't Always So 'Extra Virgin'

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 8:40 am

Freshly picked Arbosana olives from the Texas Olive Ranch in Carrizo Springs, Texas.
Karen Lee Henry

Italians may still be light-years ahead when it comes to gelato, but when it comes to extra-virgin olive oil? Watch out: U.S. producers are on it.

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5:11pm

Thu December 6, 2012
Economy

Businesses, Not Consumers, Sour On Economy

Originally published on Thu December 6, 2012 6:40 pm

Shoppers carry bags during Black Friday sales at the South Shore Plaza in Braintree, Mass. Right now, consumers are feeling positive, but the mood among businesses is at recession levels.
Allison Joyce Getty Images

When it comes to the economy, consumers and business owners have very different takes right now. Consumers are feeling positive, but the mood among businesses is at recession levels.

In a word, business owners are bummed.

"What we've found is that a lot of that optimism is not there right now," says Dennis Jacobe, chief economist for Gallup, which polled these small-business types just after the election.

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8:52am

Thu December 6, 2012
The Two-Way

Jobless Claims Fell Last Week; But Job Growth Was Likely Weak Last Month

Originally published on Thu December 6, 2012 1:55 pm

Looking for work: There was a long line last month as job seekers waited to get into an employment fair at Kennedy-King College in Chicago.
Scott Olson Getty Images

There were 370,000 first-time claims for unemployment insurance last week, down 25,000 from the week before, the Employment and Training Administration says.

The drop is another sign that after several weeks of spikes because many people were thrown out of work due to damage related to late October's Superstorm Sandy, claims have now settled back into the range where they've been for most of the past year.

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5:22am

Thu December 6, 2012
Business

U.S. Becomes Less Dependent On Foreign Oil

The Department of Energy projects domestic oil production in the U.S. will grow faster than consumption in coming years. That means the country needs to import much less oil in the future.

5:12am

Thu December 6, 2012
Around the Nation

Post Sandy: Atlantic City Wants Its Tourists Back

Originally published on Thu December 6, 2012 4:24 pm

Atlantic City's boardwalk, with its shops, restaurants, casinos and hotels, was mostly protected during Hurricane Sandy by a dune restoration project. But TV images of one small section that was damaged gave the impression that the whole thing was destroyed.
David Schaper/NPR

A month after Hurricane Sandy pounded the New Jersey Shore, Atlantic City is back in business. Even though most of the casinos and restaurants sustained very little damage in the storm, they're now suffering from a lack of visitors. But the city has launched an effort to change that.

As three young boys roll their skateboards down the "World Famous Atlantic City Boardwalk," it's proof that it is still here, fully in tact, and that rumors of its demise were greatly exaggerated.

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