Business

5:38pm

Fri April 10, 2015
Business

General Electric To Sell Majority Of Finance Arm, Real Estate Holdings

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 7:30 pm

The sprawling conglomerate General Electric is radically paring down its business, ditching most finance and real estate operations. GE was badly burned by the financial crisis, and the plan announced Friday would protect it from the risks associated with banking.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

5:31am

Fri April 10, 2015
Latin America

Airbnb Finds Interest In Cuba But Hurdles Must Be Overcome First

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 7:56 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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5:07am

Fri April 10, 2015
Planet Money

How Solar Power Has Gotten So Cheap, So Fast

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 7:56 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's talk now about a different kind of technology - solar power. Solar is a clean source of energy long considered too expensive, but now that's changing. Jacob Goldstein of NPR's Planet Money team has been asking why solar power has grown so cheap so fast.

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5:58pm

Thu April 9, 2015
Business

Brands Target Tween Girls In Bid To Keep Them As Longtime Customers

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 9:06 am

In a video posted to YouTube last year by the women's health company HelloFlo, a preteen girl fakes her period and faces unexpected, and embarrassing, repercussions from her mother.
YouTube

Quick — name one awkward thing you could talk about with a 12-year-old girl. How about menstruation?

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3:56pm

Thu April 9, 2015
Shots - Health News

Medical Schools Reboot For 21st Century

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 8:27 pm

Dr. Raj Mangrulkar and medical student Jesse Burk-Rafel at the University of Michigan Medical School. Good communication skills, teamwork and adaptability will help doctors thrive through swift changes in medical science, Mangrulkar says.
Leisa Thompson Courtesy of University of Michigan Medical School

Medicine has changed a lot in the past 100 years. But medical training hasn't — until now. Spurred by the need to train a different type of doctor, some top medical schools around the U.S. are tearing up the textbooks and starting from scratch.

Most medical schools still operate under a model pioneered in the early 1900s by an educator named Abraham Flexner.

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3:42pm

Thu April 9, 2015
The Two-Way

PG&E Hit With $1.6 Billion Penalty For 2010 Calif. Pipeline Explosion

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 9:36 am

A Sept. 10, 2010 photo showing firefighters and rescue crews working amid damage caused by the pipeline explosion in San Bruno, Calif.
Jeff Chiu AP

Pacific Gas & Electric Co.has been ordered to pay a $1.6 billion penalty — the largest ever levied against a public utility — for a 2010 explosion in a gas pipeline it operated that killed eight people and destroyed dozens of homes in a San Francisco suburb.

The five-member California Public Utilities Commission voted 4-0 Thursday to impose the penalty. President Michael Picker called for a larger review of problems at PG&E, a move that The Associated Press says "suggests the energy behemoth could be broken up."

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2:42pm

Thu April 9, 2015
The Two-Way

Uber Launches Cash-Only Rickshaw Service In Indian Capital

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 4:19 pm

An auto-rickshaw in New Delhi. You can use an Uber app in the Indian capital to hail the three-wheeled vehicles.
Manish Swarup AP

Ride-hailing service Uber has launched a new service in the Indian capital of New Delhi — for auto rickshaws, the popular three-wheeled vehicles.

The big difference between UberAuto and the ride-hailing service's other offerings worldwide: You pay the autos, as the vehicles are known in India, only in cash. Fares are set by the state.

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9:15am

Thu April 9, 2015
The Two-Way

Founder Of Indian IT Giant Satyam Gets 7 Years For Fraud

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 12:33 pm

Ramalinga Raju, founder and former chairman of fraud-hit Satyam Computer Services, is escorted from a court in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad in April 2009. Raju and nine other defendants have been convicted of fraud and conspiracy.
Krishnendu Halder Reuters/Landov

In one of India's largest-ever cases of corporate fraud, the founder and chairman of failed outsourcing giant Satyam Computer Services and nine other defendants have been sentenced to seven years in prison on charges of stealing millions from shareholders.

An Indian court in the country's tech hub, Hyderabad, ruled Thursday that B. Ramalinga Raju, his two brothers and seven other officials of Satyam — which collapsed in 2009 — used forged documents and fake bank accounts in a scheme that cost the company's shareholders $2.28 billion.

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7:08am

Thu April 9, 2015
All Tech Considered

Weighing Privacy Vs. Rewards Of Letting Insurers Track Your Fitness

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 7:11 pm

Patient Gary Wilhelm looks at his medical data on a smartphone that is synchronized to a new Fitbit Surge on his wrist.
Mel Evans AP

Would you be willing to hand over your health information to a life insurance company, in exchange for financial rewards?

Activity trackers have become increasingly popular over the past few years, tracking everything from how many steps you walk to your location throughout the day.

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5:52am

Thu April 9, 2015
Around the Nation

Calif. Farmers Face Harsh Realities In Drought-Stricken Central Valley

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 7:34 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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