Business

6:55am

Wed February 20, 2013
Business

Boeing's Tech Workers Vote To Authorize Strike

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 9:41 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Boeing has won a partial victory in a contract dispute with its engineering union, and that reduces the odds of a strike, as Ashley Gross of member station KPLU in Seattle reports.

ASHLEY GROSS, BYLINE: The engineering union covers two sets of workers - salaried engineers and hourly technical workers. The engineers voted to accept Boeing's final offer. The technical workers rejected it and authorized a strike.

They'll negotiate again before a walkout, but that split vote puts union leaders like Tom McCarty in a tough position.

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6:53am

Wed February 20, 2013
Business

Business News

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 9:41 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a jumbo raise.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: A new regulatory filing by Bank of America shows its CEO received quite a raise last year. Brian Moynihan got nearly a 75 percent increase in 2012 - a pay package valued at more than $12 million. The previous year he was paid a measly $7 million.

B of A's stock has been performing well, but analysts say the bank still faces issues from the financial crisis. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

6:53am

Wed February 20, 2013
Business

Law Change Makes It Harder To Unlock Cellphones

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 9:41 am

Maybe you don't like your mobile phone carrier, but you like your phone and you want to keep it but change providers. An obscure change in federal law makes it illegal to switch without permission from your carrier.

If you have, for example, AT&T, in order to switch to T-Mobile you have to unlock the phone, and AT&T can now stop you from doing that.

The change in the copyright law has some people upset, and they're petitioning the White House for a fix.

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6:53am

Wed February 20, 2013
Health

Being Obese Can Weigh On Employees' Insurance

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 9:41 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

As Yuki just reported, employers are looking very closely at using carrots and sticks to get workers to change their unhealthy ways. Let's learn more now about that provision in the health care law which allows employers to put in place wellness programs aimed at improving health and managing health care costs. Morgan Downey is an advocate for people with obesity. He's also the editor of the Downey Obesity Report.

Thanks for joining us.

MORGAN DOWNEY: Not at all. It's my pleasure.

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6:53am

Wed February 20, 2013
Business

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 9:41 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

In its quest to stem its losses, the U.S. Postal Service is venturing into new territory. We are you know, of course, it plans to end certain Saturday mail service to trim costs. But the USPS is also looking into a new revenue stream, which is today's last word in business: fashionable delivery.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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3:08am

Wed February 20, 2013
Working Late: Older Americans On The Job

When A Bad Economy Means Working 'Forever'

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 8:34 pm

The recession put a dent in Sims-Wood's savings, and she expects she'll have to stay in the workforce "forever."
Gabriella Demczuk NPR

Increasingly, people are continuing to work past 65. Almost a third of Americans between the ages of 65 and 70 are working, and among those older than 75, about 7 percent are still on the job. In Working Late, a series for Morning Edition, NPR profiles older adults who are still in the workforce.

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3:04am

Wed February 20, 2013
All Tech Considered

In New York, Taxi Apps Raise Objections From Competitors

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 9:56 am

New York City rules will soon permit yellow cab drivers to accept rides through smartphone apps.
Richard Drew AP

Even people who've never been to New York can tell you how to hail one of the iconic yellow cabs there. You just raise an arm and flag one down.

But the city wants to change that. Following the lead of cities like San Francisco and Washington, D.C., New York wants to permit passengers to use smartphone apps to find a cab.

Since Mayor La Guardia established New York's modern taxi system in 1937, there have been two big innovations in cab hailing: the whistle and the red light bulb on top of apartment building awnings.

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5:17pm

Tue February 19, 2013
Shots - Health News

Why The Hospital Wants The Pharmacist To Be Your Coach

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 9:41 am

Walgreens is one of several pharmacies that have partnered with hospitals to help manage patients after they've returned home.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

About 1 in 5 Medicare patients who leave the hospital come back within 30 days. Those return trips cost U.S. taxpayers a lot of money — more than $17 billion a year.

In October, the federal government started cracking down on hospitals, penalizing them if too many of their patients bounce back.

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5:15pm

Tue February 19, 2013
Economy

End Of Winter Drives Nation's Gas Prices Uphill

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 6:42 pm

Reports indicate that gas pump prices are at their highest level on record for this period of the year, but consumers might see a break in the near future — if all goes well.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

If you've been behind the wheel recently, you already know gasoline prices are up.

The national average price for regular gas rose to nearly $3.75 a gallon Tuesday, according to AAA's Daily Fuel Gauge Report.

"Retail prices have gone up for each of the last 33 or so days — dating back to about Jan. 17," says Denton Cinquegrana, executive editor at the Oil Price Information Service.

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5:09pm

Tue February 19, 2013
Technology

Report: Chinese Government Hackers Behind Dozens Of Attacks On U.S. Companies

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 6:42 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The Chinese army is the source of a persistent and prolific cyber espionage unit, whose hackers have attacked dozens of U.S. corporations and government agencies. That's the conclusion of a lengthy report released today by the computer security firm Mandiant. Mandiant says the hacking campaign goes back at least to 2006 and it targeted industries strategic to China's growth, including IT, energy and aerospace.

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