Business

5:04am

Fri November 30, 2012
Planet Money

Why Mexico Is The World's Biggest Exporter Of Flat-Screen TVs

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 11:04 am

Mark Lennihan AP

Most of the news we hear about Mexico these days is about drug-related violence. But it turns out there's another, brighter story there: The country's economy has been growing at a solid pace for the past couple years, driven in large part by solid exports.

Among other things, Mexico is the world's largest exporter of flat-screen TVs. There are a lot of factories just south of the U.S. border, filled with workers putting together televisions. The individual parts come from Asia, but the final assembly is done in Mexico.

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5:04am

Fri November 30, 2012
It's All Politics

How Much Income Taxes Could Rise: A Breakdown Of The Options

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 10:46 am

House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill Thursday after private talks with Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

"No substantive progress has been made." That's what House Speaker John Boehner had to say Thursday about efforts to avoid automatic spending cuts and tax increases at year's end.

The administration's lead negotiator, Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner, met with congressional leaders from both sides of the aisle Thursday, looking for an agreement on the hazard Congress and the White House created last year to focus their minds on deficit reduction.

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5:04am

Fri November 30, 2012
Sports

How David Beckham Changed U.S. Soccer

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 7:05 am

Five years after his much-hyped arrival in the United States, David Beckham is playing his last game for the L.A. Galaxy on Saturday. David Greene speaks with Los Angeles Times sportswriter Kevin Baxter about whether Beckham lived up to America's expectations.

5:19pm

Thu November 29, 2012
Business

A Bet Or A Prediction? Intrade's Purpose Is Debated

Originally published on Thu November 29, 2012 6:02 pm

Ireland-based Intrade lets users bet money on all manner of predictions — like if a particular film will win an Oscar. The site is ceasing operations in the U.S.
NPR/Intrade screen grab

The popular website Intrade allows its users to bet on the odds of almost anything — like whether Syrian President Bashar al-Assad will get ousted by a certain date, or whether the movie Argo will win best picture at the Oscars.

This week, Ireland-based Intrade announced that U.S. users will have to unwind their bets and shut down their accounts by the end of the year. That's after the Commodity Futures Trading Commission sued Intrade for operating an unregistered exchange.

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5:18pm

Thu November 29, 2012
It's All Politics

Would Raising Taxes On Investment Income Hurt The Economy?

Originally published on Thu November 29, 2012 9:53 pm

A screen grab from an ad by the Defend My Dividend campaign, which is funded by utilities and other companies. They don't support a proposed increase in taxes from investment income.
YouTube

5:16pm

Thu November 29, 2012
All Tech Considered

Yet Another Shift In Facebook Policies Raises Privacy Concerns

Originally published on Thu November 29, 2012 5:37 pm

Joerg Koch AP

Facebook has a long history of upsetting its users by suddenly announcing a change to its privacy settings. In 2009, as a way to quiet the critics, Facebook set up a system for its customers to vote on changes. If enough of them were unhappy, the company would back down. Now, Facebook wants to get rid of the voting.

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4:57pm

Thu November 29, 2012
Business

Lower Water Levels Dry Up Business On Great Lakes

Originally published on Thu November 29, 2012 5:37 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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3:44pm

Thu November 29, 2012
The Salt

Tastier Winter Tomatoes, Thanks to A Boom in Greenhouse Growing

Originally published on Wed December 5, 2012 8:36 am

The taste of Mock's tomatoes starts with the seed. He uses only organic varieties, including cherry and several heirloom varieties.
Allison Aubrey NPR

It may sound like an oxymoron: a delicious local, winter tomato — especially if you happen to live in a cold climate.

But increasingly, farmers from West Virginia to Maine and through the Midwest are going indoors to produce tomatoes and other veggies in demand during the winter months. "There's a huge increase in greenhouse operations," Harry Klee of the University of Florida tells us.

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12:33pm

Thu November 29, 2012
The Salt

Quinoa Craze Inspires North America To Start Growing Its Own

The seeds of this goosefoot plant are known as quinoa, a superfood now in high demand and grown almost exclusively in South America. But some growers think they have the formula to grow it up north.
Janet Matanguihan courtesy Kevin Murphy

The explosion in world popularity of quinoa in the past six years has quadrupled prices at retail outlets. But for all the demand from upscale grocery stores in America to keep their bulk bins filled with the ancient grain-like seed, almost no farmers outside of the arid mountains and coastal valleys of Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, and Chile grow it.

But plant breeders and scientists who study the biology and economics of quinoa say that is about to change.

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11:54am

Thu November 29, 2012
Politics

Will Payroll Tax Cut Survive Fiscal Talks?

The Bush-era tax cuts are taking center stage on discussions about deficit reduction. But the payroll tax holiday is also at risk, which could cost the typical family $1,000 a year. Host Michel Martin talks with The Wall Street Journal's Sudeep Reddy about the fiscal cliff and how the outcome could affect consumers.

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