Business

5:38pm

Fri August 9, 2013
The Salt

Did Tyson Ban Doping Cows With Zilmax To Boost Foreign Sales?

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 6:36 pm

A pen at a feedlot in central Kansas that houses 30,000 cattle. Feedlots are where cattle are "finished" before slaughter, often with the use of growth-promoting drugs like zilpaterol.
Peggy Lowe Harvest Public Media

Tyson Foods Inc. announced this week that it would soon suspend purchases of cattle that had been treated with a controversial drug, citing animal welfare concerns.

But many in the industry wonder if the real reason is the battle for sales in other countries, where certain drugs that make livestock grow faster are banned.

"I really do think this is more of a marketing ploy from Tyson to raise some awareness so they can garner some export business from our overseas export partners," says Dan Norcini, an independent commodities broker.

Read more

3:31pm

Fri August 9, 2013
Planet Money

The Raisin Outlaw Of Kerman, Calif.

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 9:39 pm

Raisin farmer Marvin Horne stands in a field of grapevines planted next to his home.
Gary Kazanjian AP

Meet Marvin Horne, raisin farmer. Horne has been farming raisins on a vineyard in Kerman, Calif., for decades. But a couple of years ago, he did something that made a lot of the other raisin farmers out here in California really angry. So angry that they hired a private investigator to spy on Horne and his wife, Laura. Agents from a detective agency spent hours sitting outside the Hornes' farm recording video of trucks entering and leaving the property.

Read more

12:40pm

Fri August 9, 2013
The Salt

Wine Waste Finds Sweet Afterlife In Baked Goods

Originally published on Sat August 10, 2013 11:26 am

At her bakery in Costa Mesa, Calif., Rachel Klemek sells cabernet brownies made with a flour substitute derived from grape pomace, a byproduct of winemaking packed with nutrients known as polyphenols.
Mariana Dale NPR

When winemakers crush the juice from grapes, what's left is a goopy pile of seeds, stems and skins called pomace. Until several years ago, these remains were more than likely destined for the dump.

"The pomace pile was one of the largest problems that the wine industry had with sustainability," says Paul Novak, general manager for WholeVine Products, a sister company to winemaker Kendall-Jackson in Northern California.

Read more

11:55am

Fri August 9, 2013
The Two-Way

Texans Call For Boycott Of Retailers That Fought Wage Bill

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 1:56 pm

In Texas, back-to-school shoppers are being urged to boycott Macy's and Kroger stores for their efforts to quash a wage fairness bill. In this file photo, a man shops at a Sears store in Fort Worth.
Tom Pennington Getty Images

A group is calling on back-to-school shoppers to boycott Macy's and Kroger stores in Texas this weekend, in retaliation for the national retailers' efforts to quash a bill that would have strengthened the state's wage discrimination law.

Read more

11:46am

Fri August 9, 2013
Around the Nation

Uncomfortable In America, Young Immigrant Says Goodbye

Tiffanie Drayton's mother moved her family to the U-S for a better life. But it wasn't all it was cracked up to be. Now back in her native Trinidad, Drayton tells host Michel Martin what inspired her to share her story in the Salon piece 'Goodbye to my American Dream.' Byline: Michel Martin

11:31am

Fri August 9, 2013
The Salt

Why Picking Your Berries For $8,000 A Year Hurts A Lot

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 10:55 am

A Triqui Mexican picks strawberries at a farm in Washington state.
Courtesy of Seth Holmes

As the supply chain that delivers our food to us gets longer and more complicated, many consumers want to understand — and control — where their food comes from.

Read more

10:28am

Fri August 9, 2013
Business

UBS To Pay $120 Million In Lehman Brothers Dispute

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:06 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with more fallout from the financial crisis.

Swiss banking giant UBS has agreed to pay $120 million to settle a lawsuit by investors. The case goes back to 2007. Investors say they were misled about the health of the financial firm Lehmann Brothers when UBS was selling them investments linked to Lehmann's debt. Lehmann collapsed into bankruptcy in September 2008. The settlement resolves claims of about $1 billion. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

10:19am

Fri August 9, 2013
Shots - Health News

'Aetna, I'm Glad I Met Ya!' — On Twitter

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:12 pm

Evidently, an old insurer can learn new tricks.
Bob Child AP

A few weeks back, Sharon Roberts, who had been diagnosed with endometrial cancer last year, tweeted:

@teachdance11: the BRCA gene test is 2 parts. Aetna paid $300 part. Not the $7000 part. Gotta be rich to be in the know

The 55-year-old teacher in Houston was surprised when @aetnahelp, a Twitter account created for customer assistance by the insurance company Aetna, quickly responded.

Read more

8:52am

Fri August 9, 2013
All Tech Considered

The Sheryl Sandberg Effect: Rise Of Female COOs

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 1:34 pm

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, in 2008.
Dan Farber via Flickr

As part of our reboot of All Tech Considered, we've been inviting contributors to blog about big-picture questions facing tech and society. One theme we're exploring is the lack of women and people of color in tech — a gap so glaring that ridiculously long lines at tech conferences have inspired photo essays and Twitter feeds.

Read more

6:25am

Fri August 9, 2013
Business

Powerball Winners Are Beginning To Come Forward

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:06 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is jackpot.

Wednesday's $448 million Powerball drawing had three winning tickets. One is held by a project engineer in Minnesota. And this morning we're hearing some county garage workers in New Jersey have a lot to celebrate.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Read more

Pages