Business

7:56am

Sat August 10, 2013
Economy

Housing Market Shows More Signs Of Life

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 7:43 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This week, the U.S. housing market showed a few more signs of life. New reports show home sales and prices rising. And those gains have been coming despite the recent rise in interest rates. Meanwhile, President Obama spoke out about changes he'd like to see in the mortgage market. We're joined now by NPR correspondent Chris Arnold who's been keeping an eye on all of this. Hi, Chris.

CHRIS ARNOLD, BYLINE: Hey, Celeste.

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5:41am

Sat August 10, 2013
Parallels

Russian Vodka (Made In Latvia) And Other 'National' Products

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 4:01 pm

If you look carefully, you'll see that the labels on bottles of Stolichnaya vodka sold outside Russia (like these in New York City) read "Premium Vodka," not "Russian Vodka."
Craig Barritt Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival

Activists around the world are trumpeting a call to "Dump Russian Vodka" — Stolichnaya, in particular — a protest against the implementation of several anti-gay laws in Russia, the latest in a marked surge in anti-gay sentiment and violence in the country.

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4:37am

Sat August 10, 2013
Sports

Bocce Ball: From Old-World Sport To New-School Phenomenon

Talbot Martin plays bocce ball at the Washington bar and restaurant Vendetta.
Hayley Bartels NPR

On the corner of H and 12 streets, across from the auto parts store sits a decently sized Italian restaurant and bar called Vendetta. Inside, there's a wooden bar and brick walls salvaged from churches in upstate New York and Maryland, and authentic Italian advertisements line the walls. Upstairs, old restored Italian Vespas hang from the ceiling.

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6:38pm

Fri August 9, 2013
The Two-Way

ITC Says Samsung Infringed On Apple Patents

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 7:18 pm

A woman talks on an iPhone as she walks past construction of a new Apple store in Berlin in April.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

U.S. trade officials have ruled that South Korea's Samsung infringed on patents owned by Apple for specific smartphone features, ratcheting up a tit-for-tat legal battle between the two electronics giants that is matched only by the ferocity of their marketplace competition.

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5:38pm

Fri August 9, 2013
The Salt

Did Tyson Ban Doping Cows With Zilmax To Boost Foreign Sales?

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 6:36 pm

A pen at a feedlot in central Kansas that houses 30,000 cattle. Feedlots are where cattle are "finished" before slaughter, often with the use of growth-promoting drugs like zilpaterol.
Peggy Lowe Harvest Public Media

Tyson Foods Inc. announced this week that it would soon suspend purchases of cattle that had been treated with a controversial drug, citing animal welfare concerns.

But many in the industry wonder if the real reason is the battle for sales in other countries, where certain drugs that make livestock grow faster are banned.

"I really do think this is more of a marketing ploy from Tyson to raise some awareness so they can garner some export business from our overseas export partners," says Dan Norcini, an independent commodities broker.

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3:31pm

Fri August 9, 2013
Planet Money

The Raisin Outlaw Of Kerman, Calif.

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 9:39 pm

Raisin farmer Marvin Horne stands in a field of grapevines planted next to his home.
Gary Kazanjian AP

Meet Marvin Horne, raisin farmer. Horne has been farming raisins on a vineyard in Kerman, Calif., for decades. But a couple of years ago, he did something that made a lot of the other raisin farmers out here in California really angry. So angry that they hired a private investigator to spy on Horne and his wife, Laura. Agents from a detective agency spent hours sitting outside the Hornes' farm recording video of trucks entering and leaving the property.

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12:40pm

Fri August 9, 2013
The Salt

Wine Waste Finds Sweet Afterlife In Baked Goods

Originally published on Sat August 10, 2013 11:26 am

At her bakery in Costa Mesa, Calif., Rachel Klemek sells cabernet brownies made with a flour substitute derived from grape pomace, a byproduct of winemaking packed with nutrients known as polyphenols.
Mariana Dale NPR

When winemakers crush the juice from grapes, what's left is a goopy pile of seeds, stems and skins called pomace. Until several years ago, these remains were more than likely destined for the dump.

"The pomace pile was one of the largest problems that the wine industry had with sustainability," says Paul Novak, general manager for WholeVine Products, a sister company to winemaker Kendall-Jackson in Northern California.

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11:55am

Fri August 9, 2013
The Two-Way

Texans Call For Boycott Of Retailers That Fought Wage Bill

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 1:56 pm

In Texas, back-to-school shoppers are being urged to boycott Macy's and Kroger stores for their efforts to quash a wage fairness bill. In this file photo, a man shops at a Sears store in Fort Worth.
Tom Pennington Getty Images

A group is calling on back-to-school shoppers to boycott Macy's and Kroger stores in Texas this weekend, in retaliation for the national retailers' efforts to quash a bill that would have strengthened the state's wage discrimination law.

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11:46am

Fri August 9, 2013
Around the Nation

Uncomfortable In America, Young Immigrant Says Goodbye

Tiffanie Drayton's mother moved her family to the U-S for a better life. But it wasn't all it was cracked up to be. Now back in her native Trinidad, Drayton tells host Michel Martin what inspired her to share her story in the Salon piece 'Goodbye to my American Dream.' Byline: Michel Martin

11:31am

Fri August 9, 2013
The Salt

Why Picking Your Berries For $8,000 A Year Hurts A Lot

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 10:55 am

A Triqui Mexican picks strawberries at a farm in Washington state.
Courtesy of Seth Holmes

As the supply chain that delivers our food to us gets longer and more complicated, many consumers want to understand — and control — where their food comes from.

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