Business

5:24pm

Wed September 18, 2013
Business

The Man Who Made Toyota A Modern Success Dies At 100

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:01 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

A giant of the auto business died yesterday, a few days after he turned 100. Eiji Toyoda was president and later chairman of Toyota. The family name is T-O-Y-O-D-A. Toyoda played a key role in the company going worldwide, especially Toyota's move into the U.S. market. Micheline Maynard covers the automotive industry. She's a contributing editor for Forbes these days. Welcome to the program.

MICHELINE MAYNARD: Thanks for having me, Robert.

Read more

5:24pm

Wed September 18, 2013
Economy

Fed Decides Not To Taper Bond Buying Yet, Surprises Analysts

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:01 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The stock market hit new highs today after the Federal Reserve made a surprise announcement. Investors and economists had expected the Fed to start winding down it's $85 billion a month stimulus program at its policymaking meeting today, but it didn't. As NPR's John Ydstie reports, the Fed said it wanted to make sure a recent improvement in the economy and labor market continued before pulling back its stimulus.

Read more

2:16pm

Wed September 18, 2013
The Two-Way

Fed Says It Will Continue Stimulus; Markets Reach New Highs

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 6:28 pm

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke speaks during a news conference at the Federal Reserve in Washington, D.C.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

The Federal Reserve said today that it is not slowing down its monthly purchase of $85 billion in bonds.

The program is intended to stimulate a sluggish economy and the Fed was widely expected to announce that in light of a recovering economy, it was tapering the bond-buying program. Instead, it delivered a surprise that caused the markets to jump, as the Dow and the S&P closed at record highs.

Read more

12:37pm

Wed September 18, 2013
The Two-Way

Beanie Babies Creator To Pay $53 Million For Tax Evasion

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 3:31 pm

Ty Warner, creator of Beanie Babies toys, attends the 2003 American International Toy Fair in a rare appearance to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Beanie Babies toy line.
Chris Hondros Getty Images

The man behind Beanie Babies, the toy animals that saw their heyday in the mid-1990s, has agreed to plead guilty to tax evasion for failing to report income held in Swiss bank accounts.

H. Ty Warner, 69, has been charged in U.S. District Court with felony tax evasion. The indictment alleges that in 1996, Warner traveled to Zurich to open an account with Union Bank of Switzerland with the intent to "evade and defeat" taxes on $3.1 million in foreign income.

Read more

12:15pm

Wed September 18, 2013
Economy

Minority-Owned Banks Play A Real Role In Recovery?

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 5:51 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more

12:13pm

Wed September 18, 2013
All Tech Considered

This Board Game Aims To Teach Preschoolers How To Code

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 1:01 pm

Robot Turtles is for future programmers ages 3 to 8.
Courtesy of Robot Turtles

In our "Weekly Innovation" blog series, we explore an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Do you have an innovation to share? Use this quick form.

Read more

11:39am

Wed September 18, 2013
The Two-Way

Proposed Rule Would Make Companies Disclose CEO-To-Worker Pay Ratio

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 3:58 pm

Warren Buffett, chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, bucks the trend on executive pay, with a salary only 11 times what the company's average worker makes.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Update At 12:30 p.m. ET. SEC Approves Rule:

The Securities and Exchange Commission has voted 3-2 to move the proposed rule ahead, with the two Republican commissioners opposing the measure.

The rule now goes for a 60-day public comment period, after which it could be formally adopted.

SEC commissioners also voted unanimously to require municipal advisers to register with the agency.

Here's our original post:

Read more

10:09am

Wed September 18, 2013
Parallels

More Old People, Fewer Workers: Nations Look To Immigration

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 5:43 pm

A man relaxes at a downtown park in Seoul. The pronounced demographic shift triggered by a plummeting birth rate and soaring life expectancy is seen as one of the greatest challenges facing Asia's fourth-largest economy.
Kim Jae-Hwan AFP/Getty Images

A story in the Financial Times caught our eye this week. It was on foreign workers in South Korea.

The story looked at the town of Ansan, where about 7.6 percent of the population is foreign. They come from other Asian countries, as well as from Russia. Here's one of the reasons for the change in South Korea, a highly homogeneous society:

Read more

6:57am

Wed September 18, 2013
The Two-Way

No Guns Please, Starbucks Tells Customers

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 10:42 am

A Starbucks customer — gun on his hip and drink in his hand — watches a rally by gun control advocates, in Seattle in 2010.
Elaine Thompson AP

With the coffee giant caught in the middle of what he says is an "increasingly uncivil and, in some cases, even threatening" debate, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz has posted a letter to "fellow Americans" asking that they not bring guns into Starbucks' shops.

Schultz writes that:

Read more

4:49am

Wed September 18, 2013
Education

Should It Take 2 Or 3 Years To Earn A Law Degree?

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Law students are looking for some changes to their education. The American Bar Association plans to issue a report in the next few weeks, recommending a major overhaul of how law schools operate. And students are hoping that a recent comment from President Obama, will boost one reform in particular: cutting law schools down to two years, from three.

NPR's Tovia Smith reports.

Read more

Pages